University of Washington School of Public Health

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Events scheduled for the Next 90 Days
Mar
3
3:30pm-4:50pm
Health Sciences K-069
more info...

Janessa Graves, PhD, MPH
Assistant Professor
Washington State University, College of Nursing

Abstract
Public bicycle share programs (PBSPs) are growing in popularity in around the world. We evaluated the effect of North American PBSPs, which typically do not offer helmets with rentals, on the occurrence of bicycle-related head injuries. An ecological study design was employed, comparing trauma center admissions for bicycle-related injuries from 5 cities with PBSPs and 5 comparison cities over time. Results showed that in PBSP cities, the proportion of head injuries among bicycle-related admissions significantly increased, whereas the proportion in comparison cities remained similar did not. Odds ratios for bicycle-related head injury were 1.30 (95% CI = 1.13, 1.67) in PBSP cities and 0.94 (95% CI = 0.79, 1.11) in control cities (adjusted for age and city) when we compared the period after implementation to the period before. Implementation of a PBSP was associated with significantly greater risk of head injury among bicycle-related trauma center admissions.

About the Speaker
Janessa M. Graves is an Assistant Professor at the Washington State University College of Nursing in Spokane. She is a health services researcher with expertise in occupational and pediatric injuries. She has a Master of Public Health degree in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and a PhD in Health Services Research from the University Of Washington School Of Public Health. Her postdoctoral work in pediatric injury research was completed at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center (HIPRC). Janessa’s research is a combination of both pediatric and occupational injury research, which includes studies on sports-related head injuries.

 


Event Sponsor: Epi Seminar Series, Department of Epidemiology

Mar
4
3:00pm-4:30pm
Health Sciences Building, H371
more info...

Donald Hedeker
University of Chicago

Methods Topic: Intensive Longitudinal Data


Event Sponsor: PHEnOM Seminar Series, Program in Health Economics and Outcomes Methodology, Department of Health Services, UW School of Public Health

Mar
5
12:30pm-1:20pm
Magnuson Health Sciences Building, Room D-209
more info...

Peter Rabinowitz, MD, MPH

Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
University of Washington


Event Sponsor: Center for One Health Research

Mar
5
12:30pm-1:20pm
Alder Commons, Auditorium/104
more info...

3/5 Speaker: Grace John-Stewart, MD, MPH, PhD; Director, UW Global WACh (Global Institute for Integrated Health of Women, Adolescents and Children); Professor of Allergy and Infectious Disease, Epidemiology, Global Health, Pediatrics, UW; Director, CFAR (Center for AIDS Research) International Core; Member, Kenya Research Program


Event Sponsor: Nutritional Sciences

Mar
10
7:00pm
Hogness Auditorium at the Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Center
more info...

Drs. Peter Rabinowitz, Greg Davis, and Lisa Jones-Engel
will present on One Health and the fascinating commonalities that can
lead to breakthroughs for animals, humans and the environment. The
presentation is free.


Event Sponsor: UW Medicine

Mar
11
3:00pm-4:30pm
Health Sciences Building, H371
more info...

Anirban Basu
University of Washington

Methods Topic: Instrumental Variables and Heterogeneity


Event Sponsor: PHEnOM Seminar Series, Program in Health Economics and Outcomes Methodology, Department of Health Services, UW School of Public Health

Mar
12
10:00am-10:50am
1107 NE 45th Street, Suite 200
more info...

Sarah Fishleder

 

We appreciate RSVPs from guests so we can be sure to have enough chairs and handouts. Please RSVP to Yael Yanich at 206-543-2891 or hprc@uw.edu


Event Sponsor: Health Promotion Research Center

Mar
12
12:30pm-1:20pm
Alder Commons, Auditorium/104
more info...

3/12 Speaker: Jason Mendoza, MD, MPH; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Adjunct Associate Professor of Health Services, UW; Core Faculty for UW Nutritional Sciences Program; Founding Co-Chair, UW Global WACh (Global Institute for Integrated Health of Women, Adolescents and Children) Nutrition Think Tank


Event Sponsor: Nutritional Sciences

Mar
12
12:30pm-1:20pm
Magnuson Health Sciences Building, Room D-209
more info...

Brenda Eskenazi, PhD

Professor, School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology
University of California Berkeley



Mar
17
12:00pm-1:00pm
Webinar
more info...

Hot Topics in Practice is a monthly webinar forum to discuss the issues currently affecting public health practice.


Event Sponsor: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice

Mar
26
March 26-March 28
Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston, Mass.
more info...

Theme of this year's conference is Mobilizing Reseearch for Global Health. Special topics include the technology revolution in genetics, transforming the OneHealth agenda, non-communicable diseases, improvement science.

Click here to register.



Apr
3
5:00pm-6:30pm
Hogness Auditorium, Magnuson Health Sciences Building, UW campus
more info...

Dr. Mary Travis Bassett is the 2015 Gloyd lecturer and the School of Public health Distinguished Alumna of 2015. The Stephen Stewart Gloyd Endowed Lecture was established in 1982 to recognize Dr. Park Willis Gloyd. The lectureship was renamed by the family to recognize Park’s son, Stephen Gloyd, who is the Associate Chair for Education and Curriculum for the UW Department of Global Health, and a professor in Health Services at the School of Public Health.

The School of Public Health Distinguished Alumni Award recognizes an alumnus or alumna with a demonstrated record of distinguished service and achievement in any public health discipline or setting. These alumni have made humanitarian contributions and had significant impact, advancing the field through research or practice. They have also demonstrated exceptional resourcefulness, innovation, and/or creativity.

Dr. Bassett was appointed commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in January 2014. With more than 30 years of experience in public health, She has dedicated her career to advancing health equity.

After Dr. Bassett completed her medical training, she moved to Harare, Zimbabwe, where she served on the medical faculty at the University of Zimbabwe for 17 years. In that role, she developed a range of AIDS prevention interventions to address one of the world’s worst AIDS epidemics. She later served as the associate director of Health Equity at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Southern Africa Office, overseeing its Africa AIDS portfolio.

Dr. Bassett grew up in New York City, received her BA in History and Science from Harvard University and her MD from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. She earned her  MPH from the UW School of Public Health. She served for many years as an associate editor of the American Journal of Public Health.

 A reception in the Health Sciences lobby will follow the lecture.



Apr
8
6:30pm-8:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 130, UW Campus
more info...

For the past 25 years, Michael Pollan has been writing books and articles about the places where nature and culture intersect: on our plates, in our farms and gardens, and in the built environment. He is the author of Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation (2013) and of four New York Times bestsellers: Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual (2010); In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto (2008); The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (2006) and The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World (2001).

This lecture kicks off the Weight and Wellness series, taking place in the spring. All lectures are free and open to the public. Once registration for each event is available to the public, we will post a link to register online.  To ensure a seat, please register in advance. Standby seating will be offered, but a seat cannot be guaranteed without a reservation.

 


Event Sponsor: UW Graduate School in partnership with the UW Alumni Association

Apr
9
10:00am-10:50am
1107 NE 45th Street, Suite 200
more info...

Debby Passey

 

We appreciate RSVPs from guests so we can be sure to have enough chairs and handouts. Please RSVP to Yael Yanich at 206-543-2891 or hprc@uw.edu


Event Sponsor: Health Promotion Research Center

Apr
11
April 11
Details TK
more info...

Details TK



Apr
14
6:30pm-8:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 130, UW Campus
more info...

Is obesity coming to a neighborhood near you? That depends on where you live. Health disparities are driven by unequal socioeconomic status (SES). Obesity rates within King County show six fold variations (from 5 to 30%), depending on address and residential property values. While higher obesity rates were observed along the I-5 corridor, waterfront properties appeared to be immune to the obesity epidemic. Shopping at high end supermarkets was also associated with lower obesity rates. Whole Foods shoppers were overwhelmingly lean; Safeway shoppers were more likely to be obese, adjusting for SES. Yet both supermarket chains offer a variety of healthy foods, vegetables and fruit whole grains, lean meats, and low fat dairy. However, their customers do not have equal resources or purchasing power.

Adam Drewnowski, PhD, is a world-renowned leader in the prevention and treatment of obesity. He is Professor of Epidemiology and the Director of the Center for Public Health Nutrition at the UW School of Public Health. He is also the Director of the University of Washington Center for Obesity Research, which addresses the environmental, social and economic aspects of the obesity epidemic. Dr. Drewnowski is Adjunct Professor of Medicine and is a Joint Member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

This lecture is part of the Weight and Wellness series, taking place in April and May. All lectures are free and open to the public. Once registration for each event is available to the public, we will post a link to register online. To ensure a seat, please register in advance.   Standby seating will be offered but a seat cannot be guaranteed without a reservation.



Apr
21
6:30pm-8:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 130, UW Campus
more info...

Increases in the numbers of children and adults with weight levels in the overweight or obese range have been observed all over the globe and are linked to global increases in rates of non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.   Efforts to combat epidemic obesity are taking place at local, regional, and national levels.  Solutions require big system changes affecting whole societies.  Dr. Shiriki Kumanyika, PhD, MPH, will reflect on what we have learned so far here at home and abroad, how to tackle societal problems with a high level of complexity, what new lessons we are learning, what lessons we might have learned before that may be returning to haunt us, and what future implications of these lessons might be.

Dr. Kumanyika is Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology  and in the Nutrition Section of the Department of Pediatrics, and Associate Dean for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

Dr. Kumanyika has a unique interdisciplinary background that integrates epidemiology and public health nutrition to focus on the primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases, with a particular emphasis on obesity prevention.  She also has a particular interest in addressing the disproportionately high risk of diet-related chronic diseases in African Americans. In 2002 she founded the African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network (AACORN) to improve the quality, quantity, and effective translation of research on weight issues in African American communities.

This lecture is part of the Weight and Wellness series, taking place in April and May. All lectures are free and open to the public. Once registration for each event is available to the public, we will post a link to register online. To ensure a seat, please register in advance.  Standby seating will be offered, but a seat cannot be guaranteed without a reservation.


Event Sponsor: UW Graduate School in partnership with the UW Alumni Association

Apr
30
6:30pm-8:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 130, UW Campus
more info...

From 2009-2013, Regina Benjamin, MD, MBA, served as Surgeon General of the U.S. In that office, she provided the public with the best scientific information available on how to improve their health and the health of the nation. Dr. Benjamin also oversaw the operational command of 6,500 uniformed public health officers who serve in locations around the world to promote and protect the health of the American People.

Dr. Benjamin is the former associate dean for rural health at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine and a past chair of the Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) —the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences.

This lecture is part of the Weight and Wellness series, taking place in April and May. All lectures are free and open to the public. Once registration for each event is available to the public, we will post a link to register online. To ensure a seat, please register in advance.  Standby seating will be offered, but a seat cannot be guaranteed without a reservation.


Event Sponsor: UW Graduate School in partnership with the UW Alumni Association

May
5
6:30pm-8:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 130, UW Campus
more info...

Human beings, as a species, are putting on weight. Obesity rates are rising in rich and poor countries alike for a variety of reasons ranging from changing dietary habits to activity levels, to exposure to artificial night time light. Intriguingly, animals that live in proximity to humans (laboratory animals, companion animals, and urban dwelling feral animals) have also gained significant weight over the same period. This change suggests that there is more to the story than the prevailing wisdom that we eat too much and exercise too little. Mounting evidence from over the past decade suggests that certain chemicals may be playing a role as well. For some people (and animals), so called obesogens- chemicals that inappropriately stimulate the development of fat cells and storage into existing fat cells- may be altering their metabolism and fat cell development, thus making it harder to maintain a healthy weight.

Bruce Blumberg, PhD, is a professor in the Departments of Developmental and Cell Biology, Pharmaceutical Sciences and Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. His lab studies the biology of nuclear hormone receptors in development, physiology and disease with a particular emphasis on how these are affected by hormonally active compounds in the diet and environment.  Dr. Blumberg was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2012.

This lecture is part of the Weight and Wellness series, taking place in April and May. All lectures are free and open to the public. Once registration for each event is available to the public, we will post a link to register online. To ensure a seat, please register in advance.  Standby seating will be offered, but a seat cannot be guaranteed without a reservation.


Event Sponsor: UW Graduate School in partnership with the UW Alumni Association

May
13
6:30pm-8:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 130, UW Campus
more info...

Why is it so hard to lose weight? What can be done about it? Research tells us that the body vigorously fights against weight loss, not distinguishing a higher body weight from a healthy body weight, which makes weight loss difficult to achieve and especially hard to maintain over time. As a scientific expert in obesity and brain regulation of appetite, Dr. Ellen Schur, MD, MS, explains how energy balance, in the form of body fat stores, is regulated and how this system reacts powerfully to minimize weight loss. She describes her innovative research findings, showing how the brain biases us toward high-energy foods when we are hungry or trying to lose weight. Dr. Schur also explains her cutting-edge research about how brain function, and even brain structure, may be changed in obesity in ways that further resist weight loss. Finally, she presents evidence-based data about successful weight-loss strategies that take these physiological factors into account. Dr. Schur shares a positive message that eases guilt and self-blame over weight loss struggles and emphasizes that small weight losses maintained over time are a powerful route to improved health outcomes.

Dr. Schur is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington in the Division of General Internal Medicine at Harborview Medical Center. She currently sees patients at the Adult Medicine Clinic at Harborview Medical Center and the UW Medicine Weight Loss Management Program at the UW Medical Center. Dr. Schur also teaches and mentors medical students, physician fellows, and graduate students who are interested in clinical research on obesity. Her research on brain regulation of appetite is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association.

This lecture is part of the Weight and Wellness series, taking place in April and May. All lectures are free and open to the public. Once registration for each event is available to the public, we will post a link to register online. To ensure a seat, please register in advance.  Standby seating will be offered, but a seat cannot be guaranteed without a reservation.


Event Sponsor: UW Graduate School in partnership with the UW Alumni Association

May
14
10:00am-10:50am
1107 NE 45th Street, Suite 200
more info...

Jeff Harris

We appreciate RSVPs from guests so we can be sure to have enough chairs and handouts. Please RSVP to Yael Yanich at 206-543-2891 or hprc@uw.edu


Event Sponsor: Health Promotion Research Center

May
15
May 15
Center for Urban Horticulture
more info...

Details forthcoming....



May
21
May 21
South Campus Center
more info...

The Undergraduate Symposium is a chance for students from across the School's undergraduate majors and minorsto demonstrate how they have applied the knowledge and skills gained in the classroom to address public health problems through research, internship, and capstone experiences. Students from the following programs will be presenting: The Public Health Major, the Environmental Health Major, the Health Informatics and Health Information Management Major, the Global Health Minor, and the Nutritional Sciences Minor.

The Symposium also provides a forum for current students, prospective students, faculty, and the community to discuss current topics in public health.



Access: The University of Washington is committed to providing access, equal opportunity and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, education and employment for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodation contact the Disability Services Office at least ten days in advance at: 206-543-6450/V, 206-543-6452/TTY, 206-685-7264 (FAX), or dso@u.washington.edu.