Skip to main content

University of Washington School of Public Health

A Window into Health Care for Mothers in Kenya

In 2014, Paul Nevin, MPH '15 in Global Health, spent two months in Kenya on a Pulitzer Center International Reporting Fellowship. These photos are part of his project documenting Kenya’s efforts to save mothers’ lives.

Nevin is the 2015 national winner for the Society of Professional Journalists’ National Mark of Excellence Awards – Feature Photography, large school division.

maternal health photo
Women listen to a Kenya Red Cross presentation on family planning
maternal health photo
A Marie Stopes Kenya employee prepares a contraceptive implant for a patient
maternal health photo
The T-shirt says “Good health for mother and child is good health for society”
maternal health photo
Bisharu al-Hussein sits with her young son in Isiolo County
maternal health photo
A house in rural West Pokot County, where access to health services is limited
maternal health photo
A mother and child interact with a Marie Stopes Kenya employee
maternal health photo
A Kenya Red Cross team giving a talk on family planning
maternal health photo
Kenya Red Cross employee giving a health talk
maternal health photo
Marie Stopes Kenya employee discusses family planning with young mothers
maternal health photo
A young child receives an immunization
maternal health photo
Trainees estimate the amount of fake blood lost during a birth simulation
maternal health photo
PRONTO International trainees practice managing obstructed labor

Says Nevin, “This was an incredible opportunity for a student with a public health background to explore advocacy through journalism. Photojournalism is a powerful public health tool for challenging inequities and giving a voice to marginalized communities. However, photographers must avoid perpetuating stereotypes and ensure that their work is empowering, rather than exploitative and demeaning.

"As we approach the 2015 deadline for achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, it is clear that Kenya will not meet its target of reducing maternal mortality by 75 percent since 1990. In fact, maternal mortality has only been reduced by one half of one percent for each of the last 20 years. Statistics alone do not sufficiently demonstrate the devastating impact on families and society caused by the preventable deaths of 7,000 Kenyan mothers each year.

"In partnership with civil society, Kenya’s government is stepping up efforts to save mothers’ lives and improve childbirth safety throughout the country. From free maternal health services to increased access to sexual and reproductive health education and contraception, there have been extensive investments in maternal health. Despite these efforts, many challenges and questions remain."

Photos by Paul Nevin
MPH '15 in Global Health
University of Washington