University of Washington School of Public Health

Student Announcements

Postings from Student Services newsletter on opportunities for students.

To sign up for SPH Insider, contact sphsas@uw.edu.
Looking for fellowships, internships, funding, ra/ta or volunteer opportunities?

Check the opportunities listings (NET ID protected)

UW The Graduate School - Public Lectures

Join us for a discussion about the need to address the nation’s public health challenges by understanding the underlying social justice values that are the basis for public health by Lawrence Wallack EMERITUS PROFESSOR, OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH. 

February 6, 2019 - 7:30pm UW Seattle, seating is limited; registration required.

Kane Hall 110

www.uw.edu/publiclectures or call 206-543-5900.

Posted: January 18, 2019

more info...
more info...

This course is open to graduate students. It may be of particular interest to those in nursing, medicine, public health, education, social work and psychology.  

In this course we will examine both theoretical and practical aspects of implementing community-level prevention programs and policies to promote health and prevent health disorders. This interdisciplinary overview of community prevention approaches will focus on the social determinants of health and health disparity reduction among vulnerable populations. The course involves analysis of community and population preventive strategies across the life course, with a focus on the design and presentation of a prevention approach to a community health problem of interest to the student. The roles of prevention leader and consumer of prevention information are emphasized.

Class takes place on Wednesdays 2:30 to 5:30 pm

HOWEVER Five classes (half of the classes) are on-line activities
rather than classroom attendance

In-person classes: 1/16; 1/30; 2/13; 2/27; 3/13

For more information contact: Carole Hooven PhD

Dept. Psychosocial and Community Health – University of Washington School of Nursing

Email: chooven@u.washington.edu

more info...

The Asian Urbanism Exploration Seminar is back this year! Apply by February 15, 2019

https://studyabroad.washington.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=11458

 Information Meeting — 

1/29, 12:30 to 1:30 PM, Gould 102

2/7, 12-1pm, Gould 102

 Dense, populous, dynamic, and vibrant are words often used to characterize the urban landscapes of Asian cities. The fluid matrix of social life, urban spaces, and transportation networks along with proximity of activities and services clearly distinguishes the major Asian cities from their North American counterparts. This traveling seminar will engage in a close-up examination of the urban landscapes of Osaka and Tokyo, two largest and most iconic cities in Japan. Through site visits and on-site exercises, students will explore both the everyday landscapes of Tokyo and Osaka and their iconic structures and spaces. This seminar will enable students to better understand how cities of East Asia support the everyday life of millions of residents and visitors; how they embody and reflect their distinct urban cultures and subcultures; and how they function as complex spatial systems.

 Questions? Please contact Jeff Hou — jhou@uw.edu.

https://www.facebook.com/AsianUrbanism/

FREE Yoga for SPH Community

Posted: January 15, 2019

more info...

Exploring the basic postures and breathing techniques used in Hatha Yoga, this class encourages gentle opening of the body and increased mind-body awareness. Using a combination of easeful movement, strengthening postures, and meditation, this class moves at a slow pace and is well-suited for beginners as well as seasoned practitioners looking to slow down.

SPH Students receive priority. Questions? Contact sphsas@uw.edu or by phone 206-685-3057.

Fridays, 12pm-1pm

January 12 – March 15

Raitt Hall, 229 “The Student Center

Kelly Wolffe is a graduate student at UW pursuing her MPH in nutrition and RD. She received her Yoga Alliance 500-hour Registered Yoga Teacher training in Oakland, California. She teaches and practices Hatha yoga with an emphasis on ​easeful movement, strengthening postures, and meditation. Kelly believes that yoga offers a unique opportunity to open up the body and deeply connect with oneself at the same time. She has special training in trauma-informed yoga and yoga for emotional healing. Kelly is also an avid swimmer, and when she is not at the pool or on the mat, she enjoys cooking, dancing, painting, and being in nature.

Annual FIUTS CulturalFest

Posted: January 9, 2019

more info...

CulturalFest Performance Showcase | Saturday, February 2 | 7 p.m. (doors open at 5:30 p.m.) | Meany Hall | $15 general admission, $10 students in advance, children 10 and under free; tickets available online and in the FIUTS office (HUB 206)

Join us as we bring together the best University of Washington artists, musicians, singers, dancers, and choreographers from around the world together onto the stage for exciting performances. Check out the lineup!

 CulturalFest International Expo | Thursday, February 7 | 10:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. | HUB Ballrooms | FREE

Join UW students presenting aspects of their culture through music, dance, snacks, conversation, and interactive activities at 35+ cultural booths! Invite your students, friends, and family (this is a great event for kids), and be sure to stop by yourself.

more info...

The UW Minority Association of Pre-Health Students (UW MAPS) is putting on a magnificent pre-health conference for high school students and undergraduates on Saturday, January 26th 9:30 AM – 4:10 PM, titled: A Shift in Perspective: Healthcare from a New Lens at the HUB!

 This conference will focus deeply on the variety of careers in the healthcare system and the multitudes of paths that you may take to get there, as well as address the importance of diversity in the health professions in order to address the nation’s need to eliminate inequities in the quality of health care for underserved communities.

 Why should students to sign up?

 Students will have the opportunity to:

 1) Network with high school students, undergraduate students, University of Washington medical students, and health-care professionals from all different fields.

 2) Attend workshops to broaden students' perspectives on what "healthcare" means, and all of the different factors that go into being a well-rounded healthcare professional. These include:

 Bioethics in Research

  1. A Different Lens: Looking at Health through Eyes of Immigrants
  2. Resilience Workshops
  3. Pre-Health Advisors from the University of Washington
  4. Nursing Panel
  5. Hands-On Dental Workshop
  6. Ultrasound Workshop
  7. and more!

Tickets to attend the conference may be purchased from this link (tinyurl.com/ybqfjkcq)  or at the door at the prices indicated (limited quantity):  

Here are the ticket prices (lunch included):

Undergrad Students: $17

High School Students: $10

MAPS Members: $12

 More information can be found on our website and Facebook event:

 mapsuwsite.wordpress.com/the-pre-health-conference/

 facebook.com/events/389312541611686/?active_tab=about

Thank you and we hope to see you there!  If you have questions, please email mapsuw@u.washington.edu

more info...

Interested in studying a foreign language and learning about different cultures? The application is now open for FLAS Fellowships, which award $7,500-$33,000 to UW students studying foreign languages.  Applications are due January 31, 2019 at 5 PM PST.

(Available to current and incoming undergraduate, graduate and professional UW students who are U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents).

For more information, visit jsis.washington.edu/advise/funding/flas/

 UPCOMING FLAS INFORMATION SESSIONS:

Tuesdays in January (8, 15, 22, 29), 3:30-4:30 PST Web Chats (see FLAS website above for access instructions)

Thursday, Jan 10, 2:30-3:30, Allen Library Auditorium, G81L

Wednesday, Jan 16, 3:30-4:30 Thomson Hall Room 317

Thursday, Jan 24, 1:30-2:30 Thomson Room 317

 Questions? Contact Robyn Davis at rldavis@uw.edu

more info...

The Bioscience Careers Seminar Series Presents: 

"Hope Is Not A Plan: Coaching Scientists for Success"

 Karen Peterson, Ph.D.

Scientific Ombudsman

Director, Office of Scientific Career Development

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

 Thursday, January 10, 2019, 5:00-6:00pm

Health Sciences Building, Room T-747

Refreshments Provided

 Karen has built a career on work that facilitates success in academia. Her professional work experience includes developing an interdisciplinary training program, managing an astronomy outreach education program, and her current roles that include facilitating scientist career success and navigating conflicts for scientists. Most of her current work involves managing expectations and preparing for success under less than ideal circumstances.

 Karen received a B.A. in Genetics from UC Berkeley and a Ph.D. in Experimental Medicine from McGill University. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the Fred Hutch before making a career transition into administration. She is often interviewed about research training and ethics issues by journals such as Nature and Science.

  Add the event to your calendar!

Didn't make it to a previous talk? Check our website for a recap!

 This seminar series is only possible because of generous support from the UW Departments of:

Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biomedical Informatics & Medical Education, Genome Sciences, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharmacology, Physiology and Biophysics, the Office of Research and Graduate Education, the Cell and Molecular Biology Training Grant, the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, the Graduate Program in Neurobiology & Behavior, and the Graduate School. Thank You!

Bioscience Careers Seminar Series Committee Members:

Cindy Wei (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Lisa Voelker (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Erika Keim (Env. & Occupational Health), Ashley Hall (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Will Chen (Molecular Engineering), Danielle Faivre (Genome Sciences), Grace Hamilton (Biochemistry), Jacob O'Connor (Biological Physics, Structure, and Design), Amy Spens (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Taylor Wang (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Albert Yen (Bioengineering)

Administration:
Mary Downes (somevent@uw.edu)

 Please send comments, suggestions, and listserv change requests to:

phd@u.washington.edu

 Access our news, schedule, and past talks at:

http://courses.washington.edu/phd/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/BiosciCareers/

Let's Do Lunch with the Dean!

Posted: January 4, 2019

more info...
Noon - 2:00pm   
South Campus Center, Room 316   

All SPH Students welcome!   
RSVP appreciated (sphdean@uw.edu)   

Let's chat - open and informal; questions encouraged!   
Buffet lunch will be provided
more info...

Instructor: Bill Zumeta

Meets: Mondays and Wednesdays, 4:00pm – 5:20pm

Description: This course is an introduction and overview of the broad field of social policy (within the U.S. primarily). The course will provide an overview of structural factors affecting the nature and evolution of social policies in the U.S. as well as some coverage of recent developments in demography, inequality and politics that are affecting social policy issues and policymaking today. We will consider the role of policy analysis tools and instruments in the social policy sphere and offer at least an overview of American approaches in the various specific policy areas that fall under the broad umbrella of social policy including: income transfer and antipoverty policies; policies relating to families and social services; health, housing and criminal justice policies (these three will be touched upon fairly briefly); and education policies from early childhood through postsecondary education.

more info...

Instructor: Bill Zumeta

Meets: Mondays and Wednesdays, 4:00pm – 5:20pm

Description: This course is an introduction and overview of the broad field of social policy (within the U.S. primarily). The course will provide an overview of structural factors affecting the nature and evolution of social policies in the U.S. as well as some coverage of recent developments in demography, inequality and politics that are affecting social policy issues and policymaking today. We will consider the role of policy analysis tools and instruments in the social policy sphere and offer at least an overview of American approaches in the various specific policy areas that fall under the broad umbrella of social policy including: income transfer and antipoverty policies; policies relating to families and social services; health, housing and criminal justice policies (these three will be touched upon fairly briefly); and education policies from early childhood through postsecondary education.

more info...

Join us for the 20th Anniversary Celebration and Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/martin-luther-king-jr-tribute-tickets-53028828654

 Thursday, January 17, 2019

12:30 PM – 2:30 PM PST

Hogness Auditorium, Health Sciences Building, 1959 NE Pacific St., Room A-420, Seattle, WA 98195

 In celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legacy, please join us as we recognize members from our community who are committed to serving communities in need, including the following esteemed guests who will participate in a panel discussion:

 Benjamin Danielson, M.D. '92, Director, Odessa Brown Children's Clinic, 2008 MLK Tribute Distinguished Service Award Recipient

 Rickey Hall, Vice President for Minority Affairs & Diversity, University Diversity Officer

 Paula Houston, Ed.D., Director of Healthcare Equity, UW Medicine

 Nicki McCraw, Assistant Vice President of Human Resources for UW Medicine

 Moderated by:

Donald Chi, D.D.S, '06, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Oral Health Sciences & Health Services, 2006 MLK Tribute Community Service Award Recipient

 Sponsored by the UW Health Sciences Administration & University of Washington Medical Center.

To request disability accommodations, contact the Disability Service Office at least 10 days in advance of the event at TTY: 206.543.6452 // Fax: 206.685.7265 // or e-mail: dso@uw.edu.

NRSA Grant Writing Workshop

Posted: January 2, 2019

more info...

Chelsea (Kasper) Faber and Jenny Brown will be leading a 4-part workshop in early January (Jan 7, 10, 14, and 17 from 3:30-5:00pm at UWMC H562) to introduce the NRSA F31/F32 awards and how to tackle them. Among other topics, we will discuss:

  • Where to begin?! How to find funding announcements and latest grant requirements (Jan 7)
  • How to begin writing your aims andresearch strategy, and some things the reviewers are looking for (Jan 10)
  • What goes into a personalized training plan, and how to write it (Jan 14)
  • Finally, on the last day (Jan 17) we will have a facultypanel and discussion to allow you to ask experienced researchers from a variety of backgrounds what has worked (and not worked) for them. 
more info...
  • To help us ensure a valuable and CSF member-driven agenda for our next ASPPH Career Services Forum meeting that will take place at the ASPPH Annual Meeting on Wednesday, March 20 from 1:30 – 5:00 pm, we would like to solicit your ideas for topics, presenters, and discussion items. Please send us your thoughts on topics and potential presenters for consideration by Monday, January 14 to Maggie Aftahi at maftahi@aspph.org.

Also note:

 

  • The 2019 ASPPH Annual Meeting is March 20-22 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA. The meeting will feature programming relevant to academic public health, global health, current public health concerns, and the future of academic public health. There are several sessions that will feature career services specific topics. Registration and housing are now open.

 

 

more info...

Target Audience: Prospective Fellows (Recent graduates (within 5 years) of CEPH accredited, ASPPH member graduate schools and programs of public health); Student Liaisons; Career Services Advisors

ASPPH fellowships provide an outstanding opportunity for recent graduates of ASPPH-member CEPH-accredited schools and programs of public health to participate in public health programs at the federal level with partnering agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and the de Beaumont Foundation.

This is your opportunity to learn all about current offerings for 2019, including insight on what fellowship and internship programs can offer early career public health professionals, a review of the various components of the online application portal, and tips for submitting a strong application.   Additionally, you will hear first-hand from ASPPH fellows as they share their perspectives on the fellowship experience. There will be a live Q&A session at the end of the presentation.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the ASPPH fellowship opportunities available in 2019
  • Discuss benefits of the ASPPH fellowship
  • Identify required components of the ASPPH fellowship online application system

For more information about ASPPH fellowships, please visit the Fellowships and Internships section of the ASPPH website. To apply for a fellowship position, please go to the online application portal at https://fellowships-internships.aspph.org.

Register for weinbar here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1882554517712391682 

more info...

CAREER SERVICES FORUM TO MEET @ 2019 ASPPH ANNUAL MEETING -   REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!

 The 2019 ASPPH Annual Meeting is March 20-22 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA. The meeting will feature programming relevant to academic public health, global health, current public health concerns, and the future of academic public health. There are several sessions that will feature career services specific topics. Registration and housing are now open.

 To help us ensure a valuable and CSF member-driven agenda for our next ASPPH Career Services Forum meeting that will take place at the ASPPH Annual Meeting on Wednesday, March 20 from 1:30 – 5:00 pm, we would like to solicit your ideas for topics, presenters, and discussion items. Please send us your thoughts on topics and potential presenters for consideration by Monday, January 14 to Maggie Aftahi at maftahi@aspph.org.

more info...

To all students interested in health equity and social justice:

 Do you see things in the communities you work with and/or are a part of that you wish were different?

  • Do you want to help change the systems that produce health disparities?
  • Are you ready to take action?

 Join experienced Sound Alliance community organizers and students from across the Health Sciences this fall in UCONJ 624. We will develop your skills in advocacy and community organizing for health equity. Participate in different campaigns that work upstream to address the social determinants of health.

 Learn the fundamentals of advocacy, organizing, and their ability to impact health.

  • Apply skills, gain confidence, & collaborate around a community-driven goal.
  • Work with local leaders to engage in community driven listening campaigns.
  • Address the social & structural injustices that contribute to & perpetuate health disparities.

Course details:

 UCONJ 624

  • Winter quarter 2019
  • Thursdays 5:30-7:20pm
  • Classroom: TBD

 Contact Leonora Clarke at clarkel@uw.ed for an add code or with questions! 

more info...

iPALS is an opportunity
for students from across
the health sciences to
prepare themselves to
practice effectively on
interprofessional teams,
through actively engaging
together about topics of
interest in healthcare and
population health.
Health profession students
at UW are eligible and
encouraged to participate.

 

During the 2018-19 Academic year, iPals will offer six
2-hour sessions to be held in South Campus Center on
the UW Seattle Campus:
Ø Acute Pain in Persons with Opioid Use Disorder
Tuesday October 23, 10-11:50am
Ø Interprofessional Care of Veterans
Friday November 16, 3:30-5:20pm
Ø A “One Health Clinic” for Persons Experiencing
Homelessness with their Animals in Seattle
Friday January 25, 10:30am-12:20pm
Ø Positive and Proactive Healthcare for Older Adults
Across the Cognitive Continuum
Tuesday March 5, 3:30-5:20pm
Ø Emergency Preparedness
Tuesday April 16, 10-11:50am
Ø Effective Patient-Provider Communication for
Patients with Communication Disorders
Friday May 17, 3:30-5:20pm
For more information on how to register for an iPALS
event, please contact Rachel Lazzar: rlazzar@uw

more info...

The Summer Health Professions Education Program (SHPEP) application is now open!

 The UW SHPEP program dates are June 24th to August 2nd, 2019.

 The application is open now (as of Dec 1).   The deadline to apply is February 15th, 2019.

 In its 30th year, shpep offers the same valuable experiences:

 Academic enrichment courses in biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, biostatistics and population health

Individualized shadowing experiences with healthcare providers and population health organization groups

Operating room/emergency room shadowing opportunities

Medical, nursing and dental clinical simulation experiences

Biomedical research shadowing opportunities

A curriculum built on increasing awareness and knowledge of the social determinants of health and healthcare disparities

Opportunities to meet health professionals

Weekend activities, including a trip to Mt. Rainier National Park

Free Room and Board

Travel expenses if needed (and within guidelines)

$600 stipend

 Please visit shpep.org to apply.

 More information about the Seattle site:  http://cedi-web01.s.uw.edu/pre-health-programs/shpep/

 

more info...

Cancer: Epidemiology & Biology

Explores the epidemiology of major cancers (infection-related, breast, prostate, lung, colon, melanoma), with an emphasis on milestones in cancer mechanisms (such as tumor viruses, cell cycle, DNA repair, and metastasis). Integrates knowledge from different fields of cancer research, with guest lectures from experts in epidemiology and cancer biology.

Assess sources of epidemiologic data for major cancers and learn to use SEER*Stat to interrogate cancer trends.

  • Integrates knowledge from different fields of cancer research, with guest lectures from experts in epidemiology and cancer biology
  • Emphasis on understanding the common biologic mechanisms underlying disparate types of cancer
  • Course covers molecular, clinical, behavioral, and social risk factors for cancer; cancer burden and disparities; screening
  • Opportunity to analyze publicly available cancer registry data

Course Instructor:

Margaret M. Madeleine, PhD

Research Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington

Associate Member, Program in Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

mmadelei@fredhutch.org

Learn more:  http://epi.washington.edu/course/524

For questions or an add code, contact epcourse@uw.edu.

more info...

The Graduate School is pleased to announce a new course for the Winter quarter entitled:

“Breaching Borders: Intersectional pathways towards equity and justice”

 

We invite graduate students, faculty, and staff from all disciplines to participate in this interdisciplinary course which seeks to engage and breach the boundaries between our various intersecting identities, and how these identities interact across issues of equity and social justice. Inspired by Gloria Anzaldúa’s concept of “borderlands”, we introduce the concept of “breaching” to invite participants to engage with, resist, and transgress across these invisible lines that have been constructed to divide us (e.g. gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, language, ability, mental health, and nation/states). The course will work as a collaborative space to explore the meaning of such identities in our lives and society, and strategize for fostering intersectional pathways towards equity and justice.

Please see the attached flyer for more information, and distribute widely across your department/unit.

 

You may email Saejin Kwak Tanguay (sjk119@uw.edu) with any questions.

more info...

We have seats open in NUTR 512 United States Food Systems Policy taught by Jennifer Otten in WIN 2019. The course meets T Th, 1:00 – 2:20 in THO 125. 

 

This course offers a broad introduction to food and nutrition policies in the United States and their impacts on population health. Real-world controversies and debates are used to illustrate policy principles, research tools, and policy analysis. It is taught with an undergraduate section, NUTR 412. 

 

It is open to students from the following schools / colleges:  Built Environment, Environment, Public Health, and Public Policy & Governance. Any others with interest may contact Susan Inman (susani@uw.edu) for access.

more info...

Anthropology Dissertation Colloquia - happening this week


Wednesday December 12th at 10:30am in Denny 313
Juan Luo, Sociocultural Anthropology PhC
"Border-Crossing, Collaboration, and Transition: NGOs' Healthcare Entanglements in the Myanmar-China Borderlands"

Thursday, December 13, 2018 1pm, Denny 313
Doug Avella, Sociocultural Anthropology PhC
"Confronting the Crisis : Examining the role of Evangelicalism in addressing Puerto Rico's economic crisis"

To request disability accommodations, contact the Disability Services Office Coordinator at least ten days in advance of event: 206-543-6450 (voice) dso@u.washington.edu (e-mail)

more info...

The non-profit Partnership for Food Safety Education is awarding scholarships to 12 full-time graduate or undergraduate students enrolled at a US-based university to attend From Consumers to Chefs: Food Safety Education Matters – the 2019 consumer food safety education conference, March 6-8, 2019 in Orlando, FL. Submission deadline is January 14, 2019.

Please help us get the word out to graduate and undergraduate students studying food safety, food microbiology, public health and environmental health.

This is a fantastic opportunity to network and engage in collaborative dialog with fellow health and food safety educators from government agencies, non-profit organizations, leading colleges and universities and the food and consumer products industries. Find out more at: cfsec2019.fightbac.org.

The non-profit Partnership for Food Safety Education delivers science-based behavioral health messaging and a network of resources that support consumers. PFSE is the creator and steward of the Fight BAC!® campaign and its four core messages of Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill.

more info...

seats open in NUTR 512 United States Food Systems Policy taught by Jennifer Otten in WIN 2019. The course meets T Th, 1:00 – 2:20 in THO 125. 

 

This course offers a broad introduction to food and nutrition policies in the United States and their impacts on population health. Real-world controversies and debates are used to illustrate policy principles, research tools, and policy analysis. It is taught with an undergraduate section, NUTR 412. 

 

It is open to students from the following schools / colleges:  Built Environment, Environment, Public Health, and Public Policy & Governance. Any others with interest may contact Susan Inman, susani@uw.edu

more info...

Course Description:  Grand Challenges for Entrepreneurs (Entre 579) explores big problems and opportunities facing society, ranging from healthcare and education, to poverty.  The course examines how solutions to these massive challenges can be researched, validated, and implemented using such entrepreneurial tools such as design thinking, business models, and lean entrepreneurship.


Students in the class will develop an  entrepreneurial mindset; when others see insurmountable problems, entrepreneurs look for opportunities to use technology and innovative thinking to solve real world problems. An entrepreneurial perspective is also a wonderful way of thinking in order to tackle new opportunities in entrepreneurship, whether it is in government, NGOs or for-profit companies. A key feature of this class is the interdisciplinary students from across campus.  If you have any questions, please email Professor Emily Pahnke at eacox@uw.edu

To Enroll, please email: MBA Registration <mbaregis@uw.edu> and cc Professor Pahnke

more info...

Extension available!!! HSSLA Student Representative Application

The Health Sciences Service Learning and Advocacy Committee (HSSLA) has openings for student representatives from the six health sciences schools (Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Social Work, Public Health, (as well as PT/OT and MEDEX), .  Students will be selected for a one-year term.  We are looking for one student representative for each school. Applications are due December 5th!

Benefits of serving as a HSSLA student representative:

  • Make your voice heard in policy development around service learning. Impact the ability for you and your classmates (and future classmates) to participate in community-based activities and projects.
  • Build relationships with UW faculty members committed to ethical community engagement practices.
  • Gain valuable skills related to community engagement, program development and implementation of service experiences.
  • Receive mention of your service to the committee in a SOM Dean’s Letter.

Student responsibilities:

  • Attend at least 80% of the scheduled meetings. HSSLA meets the second Thursday of every month from 11:30-12:30, PST (conference capabilities are available for student participation). Flexibility will be granted for students whose schedules conflict with the meeting time.
  • Act as a communication liaison with members of your school by providing updates on the activity of the committee and supporting students to develop and participate in community engagement projects.
  • Gather information and feedback to represent the student point of view on specific topics at meetings.
  • Provide information to HSSLA members on emerging issues.
  • Serve on ad hoc subcommittees (such as the Common Book or Mobile Health Van subcommittee) as requested.

Membership eligibility:

  • UW students in good standing and with an interest in community service, service learning and/or advocacy are eligible to serve on the committee

If you are interested in serving on a committee or know of someone that you would like to nominate, email Leonora Clarke, clarkel@uw.edu with the following information: 

  • Name
  • Year
  • A brief statement about why you would like to serve on the committee.

Students will be notified on December 10th and expected to attend the December 13th HSSLA meeting.

SPH End of the Quarter Celebration

Posted: December 5, 2018

more info...

When: Thursday, December 6

4:30pm-6:30pm

 

Where: HUB Bowling Alley

 

For more information please contact SPHSAS@uw.edu

more info...

Instructor: Carlos Cuevas, PhD

Meets: Thursdays, 2:30pm – 5:20pm

This course aims at preparing students to address performance monitoring and evaluation of programs they find already in progress when they enter professional practice, as well as familiarizing them with advanced topics in program design and evaluation. It does have a strong emphasis on implementation/process evaluation since this area of evaluation work seems dominant in professional practice. Students will have taken PUBPOL 526 Program Evaluation, and ideally advanced multivariate analysis. Please contact the instructor at cecuevas@uw.edu if you have questions regarding prerequisite requirements.

more info...

PUBPOL 598 C: Citizen Behavior Change for Social Good: The Social Marketing Approach (SLN 19569) 
Instructor: Nancy Lee

Meets: Wednesdays, January 9, 16, 30, February 6 from 10:30am – 12:50pm

This 1-credit course provides an in-depth and hands-on introduction to Social Marketing, a proven citizen behavior change discipline first distinguished in the early 1970s. It has had a profound impact on influencing citizen behaviors for social good, ones that:

  • Improve public health: Tobacco, HIV/AIDS, Obesity, Immunizations, Physical Activity
  • Prevent injuries: Traffic and Pedestrian Safety, Workplace Safety, Drowning Prevention
  • Protect the environment: Water Quality, Water Conservation, Air Quality, Alternative Transportation, Energy Conservation, Waste Management, Fish and Wildlife Habitats, Stormwater Runoff
  • Contribute to communities: Blood Donation, Crime Prevention, Literacy, Voting, Homelessness
  • Enhancing financial well-being: Retirement savings, College funding, Checking accounts for the poor.

It should be noted that Social Marketing is not the same as Social Media, which is only one tactic in the Social Marketer’s toolbox for behavior change for social good.

more info...

Instructor: Bill Zumeta, PhD

Meets: Mondays & Wednesdays, 4:00pm – 5:20pm

This course is an introduction and overview of the broad field of social policy primarily within the U.S. The course will provide an overview of structural factors affecting the nature and evolution of social policies in the U.S. as well as some coverage of recent developments in demography, inequality and politics that are affecting social policy issues and policymaking today. We will consider the role of policy analysis tools and instruments in the social policy sphere and offer at least an overview of American approaches in the various specific policy areas that fall under the broad umbrella of social policy including: income transfer and antipoverty policies; policies relating to families and social services; health, housing and criminal justice policies (these three will be touched upon fairly briefly); and education policies from early childhood through postsecondary education.

more info...

Instructor: Laura Evans, PhD

Meets: Tuesdays, 2:30pm – 5:20pm

This course analyzes racial disparities in social, economic, and political outcomes. In the course, students will examine the ongoing consequences of historical and institutional racism; evaluate contemporary racial attitudes and their consequences for policy and management; and consider the policy and management alternatives to reduce racial bias and racebased disparities.

Flu Shots Clinics-on campus

Posted: November 20, 2018

more info...

FLU SHOT CLINICS

Monday 11.26:

3-5pm

Ethnic Cultural Center

39th & Brooklyn

Native Room (208)

 

Wednesday 11.28:

11:30am-1:30pm

HUB 214

 

Thursday 11.29

3-5pm

Madrona Hall 311

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What should I bring?
Bring your ID as well as an insurance card OR method of payment. Most insurance plans will cover 100% of the cost of a flu vaccine at the UW flu shot clinics. You may pay out-of-pocket using a credit card, debit card, or check.

How much does it cost?
There are two options in paying for your flu shot: bill your health insurance, or pay out-of-pocket.

Seattle Visiting Nurses Association can bill most insurance plans, including ISHIP and GAIP (Lifewise) and Apple Health managed care.

The out-of-pocket cost of the standard quadrivalent vaccine is $40. The thimerosol-free vaccine given to pregnant people is $42.

Learn more at hallhealth.washington.edu

 

more info...

There are 5 spaces open in JSIS 578 A: Cross-Cultural Religious Literacy with Chris Seiple. This course meets on Mondays in winter 2019 from 11:30a-1:20p.

Finding solutions to global challenges demands different perspectives, as well as partnerships among individuals and institutions who do not share the same values. How does one build unity without uniformity across sectors—each of which possess believers and faith-based actors—in order to effectively lead in complicated times? Through theory, case study and the practical experience of both the instructor and the students, this course understands and wrestles with the role of religion in context—at least as an underexamined analytic factor, and perhaps even as tremendous force for the common good – and seeks to teach the skill sets of evaluation (self & contextual), communication, and negotiation as a means to mutual literacy and respect across cultures and countries.

more info...

WINTER COURSE:  EPI 519

Research Methods and Current Topics in Cardiovascular Epidemiology

Lecture:  Tuesdays & Thursdays, 8:30 – 9:50  |  3 credits  |  SLN 14510

Cardiovascular disease claims more lives each year than any other health threat.

Learn more about this pervasive and complex condition and the role of epidemiology in improving cardiovascular health.

The course provides an overview of epidemiologic research methods applied to current topics in cardiovascular and cardiometabolic health and disease in human populations.  Content includes: pathophysiology; molecular, clinical, behavioral, and social risk factors; burden and disparities across and within populations nationally and globally; and public health interventions.

Course Instructor:

Nicholas L. Smith, PhD

Professor, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington

nlsmith@uw.edu

Learn more: epi.washington.edu/course/519

For questions or an add code, contact epcourse@uw.edu

more info...

To all students interested in health equity and social justice:

 Do you see things in the communities you work with and/or are a part of that you wish were different?

  • Do you want to help change the systems that produce health disparities?
  • Are you ready to take action?

 Join experienced Sound Alliance community organizers and students from across the Health Sciences this fall in UCONJ 624. We will develop your skills in advocacy and community organizing for health equity. Participate in different campaigns that work upstream to address the social determinants of health.

 Learn the fundamentals of advocacy, organizing, and their ability to impact health.

  • Apply skills, gain confidence, & collaborate around a community-driven goal.
  • Work with local leaders to engage in community driven listening campaigns.
  • Address the social & structural injustices that contribute to & perpetuate health disparities.

 Course details:

 UCONJ 624

  • Winter quarter 2019
  • Thursdays 5:30-7:20pm
  • Classroom: TBD

 Contact Leonora Clarke at clarkel@uw.ed for an add code or with questions! 

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Graham Pruss, Sociocultural Anthropology PhC
Friday, December 7th, 2018 at  3:00pm in Raitt 121
Title: "Vehicle Residency: Displacement, Disaffiliation, and the Nomadic Turn"


Over half of the people who sleep on the streets of Seattle and King County inhabit a vehicle. The number of people who sleep in vehicles throughout King County rose by 383% from 2008 to 2018 - nearly quadrupling from 881 to 3,372. However, there are almost no programs offering parking spaces to connect vehicle residents with services that “end homelessness.” Why?

To answer this question, Graham Pruss presents his eight-years of ethnographic research in Seattle. Pruss shows how vehicle residency can be an adaptive response to displacement, and how mobility is weaponized to disaffiliate vehicle-homes. His archival research documents vehicle residency as a growing response to unaffordable housing in communities across the country, suggesting the possibility of a social nomadic turn: an emergent culture of a “New American Traveler.”

To request disability accommodations, contact the Disability Services Office Coordinator at least ten days in advance of event:
206-543-6450 (voice) dso@u.washington.edu (e-mail)

Global Health Business Case Competition

Posted: November 13, 2018

more info...

REGISTRATION OPENS NOVEMBER 30TH FIND OUT MORE: bit.ly/1NxBCQa 

The Global Health Business Case Competition (GHBCC) is in its fourth year at the UW Foster School of Business. The competition builds on the traditional business school case competition model by bringing together students from multiple disciplines to address a critical global health challenge. Student teams will all face the same challenge and have forty-eight hours to analyze the case and develop recommendations.

GHBCC has an Undergraduate Track and a Graduate Track. Each team should consist of 2-4 students from the Seattle, Tacoma, or Bothell University of Washington campuses. Cross disciplinary teams are required! The Graduate track requires one business student. All participants must be currently enrolled students during Winter Quarter 2019. A winner will be selected from each track. The winning team gets $500; 2nd place teams win $200.

Info Sessions:

Wednesday, November 14th 

2:30-1:20pm Paccar Hall - Deloitte Commons

Tuesday, November 20th
5:00-6:00pm Paccar Hall - Deloitte Commons Wednesday,

December 5th
3:30-4:30pm Paccar Hall - Deloitte Commons

Team Formation Events:  Thursday, November 29th

5:00-6:00pm Paccar Hall - Deloitte Commons Wednesday, January 9th
5:00-6:30pm Paccar Hall 456 - Gamble Room

Competition Kickoff:

Wednesday, January 23rd
5:30-6:30pm BofA Exec Ed Bldg - Douglas Forum (4th Floor)

 

more info...

. This course will be open to all graduate students in Period II registration, beginning on Monday, November 19, with no add codes needed. 

 

COM 597 D: Special Topics – Family Communication, Kristina Scharp, TTh 10:30-12:20, 5 credits

All families are discourse dependent. This means that every family requires communication to create a shared family identity. Yet, some families are more discourse dependent than others. When families lack blood or legal ties and/or deviate from cultural expectations, they require more communication to construct what it means to be a family both for themselves and to people outside of the family. In this course, we will not only explore the central theories and major processes that serve as the foundation for family communication, but also interrogate the ideologies that render certain families as more discourse dependent than others. Consequently, we will focus on the three “R’s” of (post-nuclear) family theorizing: remaking, resistance, and resilience. In doing so, we attend to the ways post-nuclear families are marginalized and stigmatized – both in public policy and in hearts and minds.

Below are some topics we will cover in this course:

Central Theories
·      Communication Privacy Management Theory
·      Family Communication Patterns
·      Intersectionality
·      Relational Dialectics Theory

Major Processes
·      Conflict and Divorce
·      Estrangement and Marginalization
·      Supportive Communication
·      Uncertainty Management

Discourse Dependent Families
·      Adoption and Foster Care
·      Arranged Marriage and the Diaspora
·      Infertility, Miscarriage, and Childfree Couples
·      Language Brokering

 

For questions, please feel free to contact Dr. Scharp at kscharp@uw.edu.

Husky Leadership Certificate

Posted: November 13, 2018

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"This program gave me an opportunity to reflect on my experiences and skills in a way that I hadn't been challenged to do before. On top of that, I was able to find a clear and confident way to articulate those skills both in person and online." - Husky Leadership Certificate alumnus 

 

Applications are LIVE for the 2018-19 cohort of the Husky Leadership Certificate program. We are seeking Huskies who practice leadership in a variety of ways. Our leaders are change-agents, entrepreneurs, scholars, activists, athletes, educators and more. This is your opportunity to reflect on your leadership development journey during your undergraduate education.  

 

Through the Husky Leadership Certificate (HLC), students identify, articulate and demonstrate their leadership learning, growth and accomplishments. Students create a leadership e-portfolio and are matched with their own mentor (faculty member/staff member/alumni) who helps them reflect upon and give voice to their leadership development. Students must be a junior or senior to be considered.

 

Applications are due by 11:59 p.m. on November 14. No late applications will be accepted.

 

Applicants will be notified by early December if they have been selected for the cohort and will then be matched with a mentor. All HLC students are required to take a 1-credit winter quarter course (available in-person or online) to support their portfolio development process. For more information, please visit the program website.

 

Please consider this unique opportunity for yourself and spread the word to other students who may be interested!

 

APPLY NOW TO BE A PART OF THE 2018-19 HLC COHORT!

 

Questions? Email us at uwhlc@uw.edu

 

HUSKY LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE

Undergraduate Academic Affairs/University of Washington

huskyleadership.uw.edu