University of Washington School of Public Health

Student Announcements

Postings from Student Services newsletter on opportunities for students.

To sign up for SPH Insider, contact sphsas@uw.edu.
Looking for fellowships, internships, funding, ra/ta or volunteer opportunities?

Check the opportunities listings (NET ID protected)

more info...

Legal Issues in Emerging Healthcare Technologies, taught by Cindy Jacobs, RN, JD, formerly Director of Business Projects for the School of Medicine.  The course will be offered this Fall on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 1:30-3:20 pm in WM Gates Hall RM 441.

 Ever wonder how healthcare deals with FitBits and other medical apps?  When a patient in one state talks to the doctor in another state, what state regulates the interaction?  This course will cover legal issues relating to cutting-edge healthcare delivery, including telemedicine, healthcare robots, mobile medical apps, gene sequencing/splicing, and personalized medicine.  Students do not need to have taken H501 Fundamentals of Health Law to take this course. 

 To register, students need to contact mylaw@uw.edu for an Add Code.

WORKGROUP ON SOCIAL DETERMINANTS

Posted: September 18, 2018

more info...

We invite you to join the Workgroup on Social Determinants of Health, a faculty-supported SPH student group.

 

Whether your interests are in research, practice or activism, students interested in learning more about health equity and the Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) are welcome to attend. This is an opportunity to learn more about specific SDoH topics, hear from community based organizations, present work in progress, read and discuss journal articles and meet students from different SPH departments who share your interests. Considering the breadth of SDoH, a wide variety of topics could be discussed, including: income, education, work, housing, neighborhood deprivation, crime, social support, racism/discrimination, inequality and social and economic policies. SPH faculty will be at each meeting to guide and discuss student chosen topics.

 

Stay informed about upcoming meetings by signing up on our listserv here (please use your UW email address): https://mailman12.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/sph_sdoh_workgroup

 

Our first meeting will be on Thursday October 11, 2018 at 12.30 to 1.30 PM in room T-498 in the Health Services Building, snacks will be provided. We will meet monthly after that during the academic year.

 

For more information contact Anjum Hajat (anjumh@uw.edu).

 

Hope to see you there!

 

Anjum Hajat, Assistant Professor Epidemiology

Stephanie Farquhar, Affiliate Professor Health Services

Jessie Jones-Smith, Associate Professor Epidemiology & Health Services

India Ornelas, Associate Professor Health Services

Ali Rowhani, Associate Professor Epidemiology

Noah Seixas, Professor Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Emily Williams, Associate Professor Health Services

more info...

Fall Quarter 2018 Gould 442

Tue-Thu 9:30-10:50 4 Credits

Instructor: Marina Alberti E-mail: malberti@uw.edu

Department of Urban Design and Planning

This course is designed to provide graduate students in the applied social and natural sciences

the theoretical and practical skills for conducting research in complex urban settings. The objective

is to develop critical and analytical skills for designing and conducting empirical and applied

research in urban science. The emphasis is on integration and synthesis of theories, concepts,

and data across multiple disciplines. Research design is framed as an emergent process. Students

will be exposed to the issues involved in research decisions and to diverse problem-solving

strategies, methods, and technical tools. The course examines the logic and limits of scientific

inquiry, conceptualization and measurement of social and ecological phenomena in urbanizing

systems, and principles of research design and practice.

 

The course is structured in two components: a theoretical/methodological component and an

applied research component. The theoretical component consists of lectures on research design

principles and approaches. Lectures cover statistical principles of research design, hypothesis

testing and statistical inference, sampling strategies, and analytical approaches to randomized

experimental, quasi-experimental, longitudinal, and cross-comparative studies. Major theoretical

issues include: threats to internal validity, sampling and external validity, reliability of measures,

causality, interpretation of statistical analysis, and ethics in research. The applied research

component focuses on emerging problems across Metropolitan Areas. Students will apply their

skills on selected pilot projects in collaboration with public, non-profit, and private partner

organizations. The class features interactions with diverse urban scientists and experts of big data

on research applications, challenges, and lessons learned through their experience.

Themes of inquiry include: Urban change and evolution, predicting and imagining the future city,

urban ecology and climate change, social networks, transportation and virtual mobility, shared

economies and innovation, urban analytics, urban sensors, and big data.

 

Prerequisites: Introduction to statistical methods, including the basic idea of random

sampling, basic probability laws, regression analysis, and statistical tests.

Seattle/King County Clinic in 1 week!

Posted: September 13, 2018

more info...

I hope you all had a good summer and are looking forward to diving into fall.  In 1 week, we will be loading into KeyArena for the 2018 Seattle/King County Clinic (September 20 – 23). If email, phone and social media activity is any indication, enthusiasm is definitely building among volunteers and prospective patients!

 

Since the Clinic is one month earlier than it has been in the past, and due to its proximity to the end of summer and start of school, we are making an extra effort toward patient outreach.  Any help you can provide in pushing out this message one more time before next week would be appreciated! Flyers and FAQs in varying languages can be found at www.seattlecenter.org/patients.

 

Similarly, we have been working to connect with volunteers during their summer vacations about the earlier date.  While we are in good shape, we still have gaps that we’d like to fill.  Please encourage those you know to sign up soon! www.seattlecenter.org/volunteers

  • Chiropractors – Friday, Saturday, Sunday
  • Dentists, Hygienists, Dental Assistants - Thursday
  • Dermatologists – Thursday & Friday
  • General Support volunteers – Sunday (still select spaces other days)
  • Interpreters (Spanish, Vietnamese, Cantonese, Mandarin, Amharic) – All Days
  • Massage Therapists – All Days
  • Mental Health Professionals (Psychiatrists, Psychologists, Licensed Counselors) – Thursday, Saturday, Sunday
  • Ophthalmologists, Optometrists & Opticians – All Days
  • Pharmacists – Thursday & Friday
  • Physical Therapists – Saturday & Sunday
  • Physicians or Nurse Practitioners for Physical Exams – Sunday
  • Podiatrists – Friday
  • Social Workers - Thursday, Friday, Saturday
  • Sonographers – Thursday & Friday
  • X-Ray Techs – Thursday & Sunday

 

Before concluding, I want to recognize our newest partners:

Auburn Dairy, Bumble Bar, DentaQuest, Georgetown Brewing Company, Gigantic Planet, Marcolin Eyewear, Oculus Eyecare, Propio Language Services, The Vision of Hope, Tulalip Tribes Charitable Contributions, Walman Optical, Zeiss

PATH 513: Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration

Posted: September 13, 2018

more info...

The M3D Program still has space available. Please see attached for more information about this fantastic course.  

 

Course content: 

Introduction/overview of mechanisms of neurodegeneration with emphasis on major pathways and focus on primary literature. 

 

Time and place:

Autumn quarter from November 6th to December 6th.

Tu/Th 9:00 - 10:20

HMC R&T Building

 

Course Director: 

  1. Dirk Keene, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Division of Neuropathology

more info...

B H 562, ETHICAL ISSUES IN PEDIATRICS, SLN#22701

T Th 8:30-9:50am, T439 HSB

Graduate level seminar course designed to explore ethical issues that arise in the clinical and

research context when caring for children.

Topics include:

  • parental permission, child assent, and confidentiality
  • cultural/religious beliefs
  • conflicts that can arise in the clinical or research context

Email bhadds@uw.edu for entry codes

more info...

SOC WL 552 (3)  Contemporary Social Welfare Policy

Time:  Thursdays 11:30am – 2:20pm

Location:  SWS 125

SLN# 21175

 

This course provides a critical, historically-informed review of the philosophical and ideological foundations of contemporary American social welfare policies, particularly income maintenance. We will interrogate the economic, political, and social factors that have influenced the development and implementation of these policies, and throughout the course we will attend to the social justice dimensions of welfare policy. We will also examine the ways that welfare policies both provide essential assistance to people in need and, simultaneously, reify distinctions between those who are "deserving" and "undeserving" of such assistance. 

more info...

OLYMPIA -- Suicide rates in Washington have continued to rise and health officials at the Department of Health want people to take five actions urged in the national “#Bethe1to” suicide prevention campaign.

 “We want people to know there are steps they can take that can help prevent suicide,” said Secretary of Health John Wiesman. “Learning these may be vitally important to those you love and care about.”

In 2017, 1,300 Washingtonians died by suicide, and from 2006 to 2017 suicide in Washington state increased by an average of 2.5 percent annually.  

The national #Bethe1to campaign, highlights five actions people can take to help prevent suicide.

  1. Be the one to ask.

Ask the tough question. When somebody you know shows warning signs, ask them directly: “Are you thinking about killing yourself?” Take an online screening.

  1. Be the one to keep them safe.

Do they have access to medications, firearms, or other means of suicide? Ask if they’ve thought about how they would do it and separate them from anything they could use to hurt themselves. Learn more from WA’s Safer Homes Coalition.

  1. Be the one to be there.

People thinking about suicide can feel a burden to their loved ones.

If your friend is thinking about suicide, listen to their reasons for feeling hopeless and in pain. Listen with compassion and empathy without judgment. Now Matters Now has videos from people who have experienced suicidal thoughts share what individuals can do to help manage those thoughts.

  1. Be the one to help them connect.

Help your friend connect to a support system, whether it’s 800-273-TALK (8255), the crisis text line (text “HEAL” to 741741) family, friends, faith-based leaders, coaches, co-workers, health care professionals or therapists, so they have a network to reach out to for help. 2-1-1’s online database is another way to find local resources.

  1. Be the one to follow up.

Check in with the person you care about on a regular basis.

Making contact with a friend in the days and weeks after a crisis can make a difference in keeping them alive. Send a caring contact. This could be a phone call, text, email, or letter.

If you want to connect with someone anonymously, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, chat, or text “HEAL” to 741741 to text with a trained crisis counselor.

More information on suicide prevention in Washington and the state’s Suicide Prevention Plan is online.

The DOH website is your source for a healthy dose of information. Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Sign-up for the DOH blog, Public Health Connection

more info...



UW Tobacco Studies Program is offering HSERV 556/FAMED 559 during Autumn 2018. This is a 2-credit and online course. For more details and a sample syllabus, see the below description, or visit our website.

HSERV 556/FAMED 559 - Tobacco-related Health Disparities and Social Justice (online; 2 credits; full term)
-Integrates multiple disciplinary perspectives to address the pressing issue of disproportionate tobacco use and related diseases among marginalized populations, including those defined by socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Explores links between, and intervention strategies for, smoking and mental illness, social stress, acculturation processes, and genetics.

Please see the attached flier that contains more information about HSERV 556/FAMED 559, as well as HSERV 558: Tobacco & Public Health, which will be offered Winter Quarter 2018.

UW Tobacco Studies Program

 --------------------

 The Tobacco Studies Program provides University of Washington students with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand and address the national and global tobacco epidemic by creating opportunities that foster integrated tobacco use prevention, treatment, and policy efforts across multiple disciplines.


The purpose of the Tobacco Scholars Program is to support master’s and doctoral students at the University of Washington in their studies of tobacco and public health in order to develop the tobacco prevention, research, control and treatment workforce.

more info...

Elizabeth Dawson-Hahn, MD, MPH  is Acting Assistant Professor, Division of Hospital Medicine and General Pediatrics.  She works tirelessly to improve the health, growth and development of vulnerable children and families in particular, refugee children and families. She will talk about the effect of family separation on child health and development. 

Angélica Cházaro, JD is Professor in the UW School of Law.  She has worked at Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) representing immigrant survivors of violence and has provided immigration legal services to farmworkers. She will talk about patient and provider rights in the context of ICE officers in medical spaces. 

 

Monday, October 15, 2018

6:30-8:00 pm

Kaiser Permanente

201 16th Ave E Room CHM D649
On Behalf of UW Network for Underrepresented Residents and Fellows (UWNURF) and Kaiser Permanente we welcome you to the Diversity Lecture Series. Please contact Nora Coronado ncorona@uw.edu if you have further questions.

 

 

Acting Up: Teaching Theater for Change

Posted: September 5, 2018

more info...

Autumn, T/Th 1:30-3:20PM, 2 credits (CR/NC), sln 23638

How do you make positive change in classroom and institutional climates so that all of our students thrive?

That’s an increasingly urgent question in higher education and beyond. One evidence-based answer: by building practical skills in Theatre of the Oppressed, social change theater, and other arts-based pedagogies. These skills promote inclusive educational environments, whether in a classroom, online, or in community contexts. 

In this multidisciplinary course, students practice using the language and methods of theater to challenge institutional oppression and advance community dialogue about power and privilege. This practice  generates opportunities for collective problem-solving. The course culminates in a student-generated interactive theater performance and dialogue.

Instructors:

Tikka Sears, Director of Theater for Change and Instructional Consultant, Center for Teaching & Learning

Elba Moise, Theater for Change Ensemble Member and Instructional Consultant, Center for Teaching & Learning

“We get to feel, embody, and bring to life our identities and experiences while learning about their impact on us and others. This work helps us re-imagine ways to intervene in problematic situations... we strategize and rehearse how to do this in real life!“ Graduate Student, College of Education, Winter 2017

More info: CTL Courses: tinyurl.com/grdschCourses Theater for Change UW:  tinyurl.com/TfC-UW

 

more info...

It's a Night of Bioethics!

We invite students in the healthcare professions (e.g., MSW, MPH, MD, DDS, PharmD, BSN, DNP, PT/OT/SLP) to join the Department of Bioethics & Humanities and the Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, Research & Practice for dinner and an evening of connecting with colleagues and engaging in ethical dilemmas!

Ethics Consultants and clinicians from UWMC and HMC will help guide small group discussion using some of the language, principles, and tools that guide bioethicists.

Learning Objectives:

Learn about principles of ethics and how they can be used to analyze a case of ethical conflict or uncertainty.

Work as a collaborative team to apply ethics analysis tools to the healthcare decision-making process.

When: September 27, 2018, 5:30-7:00pm Where: Health Sciences Building T-229 There will be pizza! Space is limited! RSVP by Sep 15, 2018: kaybrke@uw.edu

depts.washington.edu/bhdept www.collaborate.uw.edu


more info...

SOC WL 598 (3) Theory and Metatheory in Social Research  Tuesday 8:30am – 11:20am

SLN#21187

 

Do you wonder what an ontology is and if it is the same as epistemology?  Are you constructed, deconstructed or something else entirely? How do these concepts relate to truth or reality?  What do these mean for research designed to improve our shared world?

 

This writing-intensive seminar introduces doctoral students to key concepts in the philosophy of social science and how various theories of knowledge inform our work as social scientists.  We will explore the nature and role of theory in contemporary social science scholarship, examine a range of epistemologies through examples of associated research products, and evaluate issues of equity and social justice within these frames.  The course provides a platform for understanding the underlying assumptions of research methods including analysis of “Big Data,” randomized controlled experiments (RCTs), ethnographies, and a variety of other qualitative and quantitative methods.

 

As an introductory seminar, we will also attend to the building blocks of excellence in academic work: critical thinking, close reading, collegial engagement, working with feedback and developing useful writing habits.  

more info...

SOC WL 552  Contemporary Social Welfare Policy, taught by Dr. William Vesnkeski, and is offered this Fall on Thursdays from 11:30am – 2:20pm in SWS 125.

 

SOC WL 552 (3)  Contemporary Social Welfare Policy

Time:  Thursdays 11:30am – 2:20pm

Location:  SWS 125

SLN# 21175

 

This course provides a critical, historically-informed review of the philosophical and ideological foundations of contemporary American social welfare policies, particularly income maintenance. We will interrogate the economic, political, and social factors that have influenced the development and implementation of these policies, and throughout the course we will attend to the social justice dimensions of welfare policy. We will also examine the ways that welfare policies both provide essential assistance to people in need and, simultaneously, reify distinctions between those who are "deserving" and "undeserving" of such assistance. 

more info...

There are 4 spaces left in JSIS 534: Legal Foundations of World Order taught by Rick Lorenz. This course examines the legal foundations of world security and stability in a time of dynamic change in international relations. Some believe that international law is a charade; governments comply with it only when convenient to do so, and disregard it whenever a contrary interest appears. But legal “norms” can still have a major impact on a wide range of economic, political and security matters. Topics will include the Just War Theory, International Humanitarian Law (the Law of Armed Conflict) and its application to modern warfare, humanitarian intervention, terrorism, nuclear weapons, suicide bombers and robotic warfare, international environmental law, climate change and the Law of the Sea.

 

Class meets Monday and Wednesday, 3:30-5:20p during autumn 2018

more info...

Course Title: SPHSC 594 / LING 582 Capturing Brain Dynamics: a combined neuroscience and engineering approach
Schedule: Mondays, 1:00-4:30 PM (Lecture & Tutorial)
Location: I-LABS (PBB 374)
Instructor: Adrian KC Lee

Course Description
This course introduces students to an emerging neuroimaging technique known as magnetoencephalography (MEG) that is specifically suitable for capturing the dynamics of our brain. Understanding brain dynamics involved in many perception and cognitive tasks is of particular interest to the fields of speech & hearing, psychology, as well as linguistics. In engineering, the understanding of how our brain dynamics can be used to interact with machines strongly influences the future design of devices using a brain computer interface. The aim of this course is to foster an interdisciplinary environment such that students from neuroscience and engineering backgrounds can develop fruitful collaborative approaches to advance our understanding of brain dynamics using MEG.

Learning Objectives
1. To develop a working knowledge of the fundamentals of MEG such that you may incorporate this powerful tool in your future research endeavors.
2. To obtain a basic understanding of processing techniques or fundamental neuroscience concepts that are not traditionally taught in your field of study.
3. To effectively communicate with your classmates from other disciplines by leading tutorials explaining concepts in your field that are important to the overall understanding or interpretation of brain dynamics.
4. To formulate and effectively communicate new research ideas that incorporate the use of MEG in a collaborative, interdisciplinary setting.

more info...

Now Accepting Applications for 2018-19 Learning Laboratory

NWCPHP and the Public Health Institute are now accepting applications for the 2018-19 Learning Laboratory. In this creative environment, cross-sector teams from across the country will explore solutions for local health departments to successfully transition from clinical to population-based health services. Opportunities for collaboration include a two-day, in-person workshop in Seattle, web-based learning sessions, and peer-to-peer coaching.

The Learning Laboratory runs from October 2018 - October 2019. The yearlong program is divided into specific phases for exploring, testing, and adopting solutions to difficult local issues related to funding changes. Participants will present their issues as “design challenges” and use interactive sessions with peers and coaches to incubate new solutions.

Why a Learning Laboratory? Public health is complex and requires new skills to successfully understand and address the challenges associated with transitioning to population-based prevention strategies. It also requires organizations and systems to work together in new ways. Unlike traditional training, the laboratory format allows participants to synthesize multiple perspectives, explore innovative solutions, and develop the strong, flexible partnerships needed to meet ongoing challenges.

Six teams will be selected to participate in the Learning Laboratory through a competitive application process. Priority will be given to participants from rural health jurisdictions. The only programmatic cost to participants is their time; there are no charges for any of the in-person and online meetings, technical assistance, or learning materials. Financial support is available for all travel expenses to the two-day workshop in Seattle for up to three team members.

Applications for the Learning Laboratory are due August 30, 2018. Learn more at the Public Health Institute website.

more info...

Join a diverse group of public health professionals, students, and university faculty at SOPHE's 20th Annual Advocacy Summit. Washington DC, October 13-15.

 *Priority registration deadline: September 13. SOPHE will place all registrants into Hill visits with Congressional staff and/or legislators based on the address listed in their registration.

 

https://www.sophe.org/advocacy/advocacy-summit/2018-advocacy-summit/2018-summit-registration-policies/ 

Summer Research Posters 2018

Posted: August 14, 2018

more info...

You are invited to the 2018 Summer Research Poster Session this Wednesday, August 15 from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. in MGH Commons. The event is open to the public and is a great opportunity to connect with undergraduate research scholars who will present research on topics ranging from clean energy to alleviating pediatric pain. Scholars include students from the University of Washington, across the country, and Japan. 
 
This is a great opportunity to learn about the amazing undergraduate research happening this summer at the UW. Many of these students are rising juniors and seniors interested in graduate school and some are just about to begin their UW undergraduate experience.

more info...

 

To all students interested in health equity and social justice:

 

  • Do you see things in the communities you work with and/or are a part of that you wish were different?
  • Do you want to help change the systems that produce health disparities?
  • Are you ready to take action?

 

Join experienced Sound Alliance community organizers and students from across the Health Sciences this fall in UCONJ 624. We will develop your skills in advocacy and community organizing for health equity. Participate in different campaigns that work upstream to address the social determinants of health.

 

  • Learn the fundamentals of advocacy, organizing, and their ability to impact health.
  • Apply skills, gain confidence, & collaborate around a community-driven goal.
  • Work with local leaders to engage in community driven listening campaigns.
  • Address the social & structural injustices that contribute to & perpetuate health disparities.

 

Course details

  • Fall quarter 2018
  • Thursdays 5:30-7:20pm
  • Classroom: TBD

 

Contact Leonora Clarke at clarkel@uw.ed for an add code or with questions! 

more info...

OLYMPIA -- The Washington State Department of Health announced today that it has joined the HIV prevention campaign Undetectable = Untransmittable, also known as U=U.

U=U describes the scientific findings that people living with HIV, who have undetectable levels of HIV in their blood, have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to their partners. Because treatment keeps these people from transmitting the virus, the concept is known as “treatment as prevention.”

“People living with HIV continue to live with the stigma that they are infectious and possibly harmful to their partners. This new evidence is critical to changing public perception of HIV transmissibility” said John Wiesman, Washington’s secretary of health.

As work to End AIDS in Washington continues, it’s crucial to promote consistent and correct condom use, routine HIV screening, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent sexual transmission of HIV.

Washington is the sixth state health department to join the campaign along with 18 other state and local health departments, and more than 700 organizations from 90 countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health endorse the science behind U=U. 

 

https://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/IllnessandDisease/HIV/EndAIDSWashington 

more info...

GRDSCH 550 explores teaching and learning opportunities created by the increasing enrollment of international and multilingual students in U.S. universities. The course focuses on evidence-based teaching practices that leverage the diverse linguistic and cultural assets of global classrooms to enrich learning for all students. 

Thursdays 2:30-3:20, NAN 181, 1 credit (credit/no-credit)

Instructor: Dr. Katie Malcolm (kmalc@uw.edu)

Student Testimonial: Eldridge Alcantara, Teaching Assistant, Electrical Engineering; and 2018 Excellence in Teaching Award recipient:
This course completely changed my outlook and approach to teaching. I was able to immediately apply what I learned to an undergraduate Electrical Engineering class I taught summer quarter 2017. Taking I/M students into full consideration, I altered the way I designed homework assignments, changed the way I conducted lectures and discussions, became more cognizant of aligning myself and my course with my students, and I included more group activities in the classroom to increase interaction between my domestic and I/M students. These changes all led to some of the best course evaluations I have received so far as an instructor.

more info...

How do you make positive change in classroom and institutional climates so that all of our students thrive?

That’s an increasingly urgent question in higher education and beyond. One evidence-based answer: by building practical skills in Theatre of the Oppressed, social change theater, and other arts-based pedagogies. These skills promote inclusive educational environments, whether in a classroom, online, or in community contexts. 

In this multidisciplinary course, students practice using the language and methods of theater to challenge institutional oppression and advance community dialogue about power and privilege. This practice  generates opportunities for collective problem-solving. The course culminates in a student-generated interactive theater performance and dialogue. 

SLN 23638

more info...

The UW Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education is partnering with the Seattle/King County Clinic (SKCC) to engage Interprofessional students teams as volunteers at the September 2018 4-day clinic.

 

The “Listening Project” is in response to the clinic’s efforts to better understand the patient populations served. Small student groups will circulate clinic waiting areas, engaging with patients who wish to share their stories related to their health, accessing care, or their experience at the SKCC. Stories will be synthesized and prepared for dissemination to the SKCC organizers, as well as city and state policy makers.

 

About SKCC:

SKCC brings together healthcare organizations, civic agencies, non-profits, private businesses and volunteers from across the State of Washington to produce a giant free health clinic in Key Arena at Seattle Center. The 4-day volunteer-driven clinic provides a full range of free dental, vision and medical care to underserved and vulnerable populations in the region. Watch this short video to learn more about this clinic.

 

Health Science Student Roles at SKCC:

  1. Qualitative interviews with patients (“Listening Project”) – engage patients with questions to elicit their stories about health and access/barriers to health care. Each student will “write-up” the interview/encounter to be used for a reflection experience.
  2. Interpreter services – non-medical interpretation and patient navigation (high need)

 

Dates & Shifts:

Each day, there will be two shifts: the morning shift begins at 9am and ends at 12 pm, the afternoon shift begins at 1pm, and ends at 4 pm. There will be a maximum of nine students per shift (three Interprofessional groups of 2-3 students). Dates and times for all eight shifts are listed below.

 

  1.  

Thursday

9/20/18

9:00-12:00 am

  1.  

Thursday

9/20/18

1:00-4:00 pm

  1.  

Friday

9/21/18

9:00-12:00 am

  1.  

Friday

9/21/18

1:00-4:00 pm

  1.  

Saturday

9/22/18

9:00-12:00 am

  1.  

Saturday

9/22/18

1:00-4:00 pm

  1.  

Sunday

9/23/18

9:00-12:00 am

  1.  

Sunday

9/23/18

1:00-4:00 pm

 

 

Next Steps:

If you are interested in participating in the Listening Project, sign up via a catalyst survey here.

Please contact Tracy Brazg at tbrazg@uw.edu if you have additional questions in your participation in the Listening Project with SKCC.

more info...

Autumn Quarter, 2018

Graduate Seminar: Thursdays, 6:00-8:50 pm, GLD 440

 

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Thaisa Way

contact: tway@uw.edu / 206 685 2523

 

"Babur supervising the construction of the Garden of Fidelity (Bagh-i Vafa)" ,

Sometimes, when one is moving silently through such an utterly desolate landscape, an overwhelming hallucination can make one feel that oneself, as an individual human being, is slowly being unraveled. The surrounding space is so vast that it becomes increasingly difficult to keep a balanced grip on one's own being. The mind swells out to fill the entire landscape, becoming so diffuse in the process that one loses the ability to keep it fastened to the physical self. The sun would rise from the eastern horizon, and cut it's way across the empty sky, and sink below the western horizon. This was the only perceptible change in our surroundings. And in the movement of the sun, I felt something I hardly know how to name: some huge, cosmic love.” 
                                                 

― Haruki MurakamiThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

 

This course is a critical historical analysis of landscape architecture as both a daily practice and an art form as it emerged in ancient cities and through the mid-nineteenth century. We will engage history as a context of practice and history as a practice. We will survey the history of landscape design and landscape architecture to consider how they shape the world in which cultures practice. We will take a historiographical approach, meaning we will discuss the ways in which the history of the practice of landscape design is written as a narrative. We will read deeply and use writing as a form of clarifying our thinking. Seminar time will focus on discussions that push our thinking to explore alternative territories of exploration. Come prepared to think with rigor and depth.

 

Our seminar discussions will be grounded in an exploration of the inscriptions in landscape from the Mesopotamia to Ghana, from the New World to Meso-America, from India to China, as case studies touching upon the broad diversity of cultural landscapes scholars have explored. We will examine the relationship between the social construction of race, gender, and identity and the construction of the built environment (architecture, urban space, landscapes) as it is inscribed in the place of landscape.  Like other arts, landscape design responds to social, economic, political and intellectual influences while serving as an agent of reflection, change, and opportunity.  Culture, philosophy, religion, and intellectual attitudes have played a major influence upon the development of this art at the same time that landscape design informs the way we live. Additionally, and unique among the arts, it must also consider geography, topography, water, soil, climate, changing seasons, and temporal aspects of plant growth. How do we then narrate a history of this complex web of influence and engagement? This course is meant to emphasize the material (read “built”) dimensions of culture as read in landscape.

 

History cannot predict the future, but it can contribute to and enhance an awareness of the forces that are likely to have an impact on the direction that the future may take. "If we treat history less as an assemblage of facts than as a practice of the mind, then the past becomes inseparable from the values we attach to it.  Thus, it is through history and in history that an ethic can evolve to meet the needs of the present and the immediate future." (Matthew Klingle, Emerald City, 2007 page 270)

more info...

Offered in Winter 2019, Italian Studies Rome: From Empire to Present Day - Language, Culture, and Society in Italy is a new program sponsored by French & Italian Studies designed for a full immersion within Italian language and culture. It will attract students interested in accelerating their Italian language skills and their general knowledge of Italian culture and society. It runs for the ten weeks of the Winter quarter at the UW Rome Center and students, if they wish, will be able to enroll in Italian 103 when they return to campus. Students will be involved in city's events, with excursions around Rome and to nearby historical sites, such as Ostia Antica. Students will also engage in two field trips to Assisi/Orvieto and to Padua. 

This program investigates the connections between the Italian language and Italian national identity, from Dante to transformations in contemporary Italian society, using the privileged vantage point of the capital of Italy. The aim of the program is to inform and expose students to the social aspects of the evolution of Italian culture and society, by highlighting the dynamic relationship between language and identity, and presenting a detailed picture of cultural diversity in the Italophone world. Students accepted to this program may apply for Italian Studies need-based scholarships to assist with the cost of the program. 

New Application Deadline is October 10th, 2018. No Prerequisites Required
More info:http://studyabroad.washington.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=11774 

 

Questions? email barduini@uw.edu

more info...

Saturday, August 11th
8:30 a.m.— 4:00 p.m.
Rainier Beach Community Center
8825 Rainier Avenue South, 98188

Did you know?

• The appointment only takes 15 minutes.
• No referral is needed for an annual screening mammogram.
Who is Eligible for a Screening Mammogram?
• Women age 40 and over
• Women who have not had a mammogram in the past year
• Women who are symptom free of any breast issue
For your appointment you will need:
• Your medical insurance card. Most insurance plans provide for an annual mammogram. Prior to your appointment please contact your medical insurance provider to verify your eligibility.
• Funding is available to provide exams for women without insurance, please inquire about a “Sponsored Mammogram” when scheduling your appointment.
• A picture ID
• The name, phone number and address of your primary care provider.
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Breast Imaging Program is an accredited Breast Imaging Center of Excellence offering state-of-the-art digital technology with specialized radiologists dedicated exclusively to breast health.
Call (206) 606-7800 to schedule your screening

Not all bugs need drugs

Posted: July 20, 2018

more info...

Are you starting to feel the symptoms of a head cold? Do you think you need a prescription for antibiotics to feel better? Not so fast. Not all bugs need drugs.


Many common illnesses like head and chest colds, ear infections, and sore throats don’t need treatment with antibiotics. Antibiotics are only effective for treating certain infections caused by bacteria. They don’t work on viruses: colds and flu, or runny noses… even if the mucus is thick, yellow or green. 

https://medium.com/@WADeptHealth/not-all-bugs-need-drugs-f59a83e736d8

more info...

for L ARCH 598O History & Historiography of Landscape Architecture Graduate Seminar is being offered Autumn Quarter 2018, Th, 6:00-8:50 pm, GLD 440, (3) credits, cr/nc, with Professor Thaisa Way (tway@uw.edu). SLN# 23611

 This course is a critical historical analysis of landscape architecture as both a daily practice and an art form as it emerged in ancient cities and through the mid-nineteenth century. We will engage history as a context of practice and history as a practice.  We will survey the history of landscape design and landscape architecture to consider how they shape the world in which cultures practice.  We will take a historiographical approach, meaning we will discuss the ways in which the history of the practice of landscape design is written as a narrative.  We will read deeply and use writing as a form of clarifying our thinking.  Seminar time will focus on discussions that push our thinking to explore alternative territories of exploration. Come prepared to think with rigor and depth.

 Our seminar discussions will be grounded in an exploration of the inscriptions in landscape from the Mesopotamia to Ghana, from the New World to Meso-America, from India to China, as case studies touching upon the broad diversity of cultural landscapes scholars have explored. We will examine the relationship between the social construction of race, gender and identity and the construction of the built environment (architecture, urban space, landscapes) as it is inscribed in place of landscape.  Like other arts, landscape design responds to social, economic, political and intellectual influences, while serving as an agent of reflection, change and opportunity.  Culture, philosophy, religion and intellectual attitudes have played a major influence upon the development of this art at the same time that landscape design informs the way we live.  Additionally, and unique among the arts, it must also consider geography, topography, water, soil, climate, changing seasons and temporal aspects of plant growth.  How do we then narrate a history of this complex web of influence and engagement?  This course is meant to emphasize the material (read "built") dimensions of culture as read in landscape.

  History cannot predict the future, but it can contribute to and enhance an awareness of the forces that are likely to have an impact on the direction that the future may take.  "If we treat history less as an assemblage of facts than as a practice of the mind, then the past become inseparable from the values we attach to it.  Thus, it is through history and in history that an ethic can evolve to meet the needs of the present and the immediate future."  (Matthew Klingle, Emeral City, 2007 page 270)

 

more info...

To all students interested in health equity and social justice:

 Do you see things in the communities you work with and/or are a part of that you wish were different?

  • Do you want to help change the systems that produce health disparities?
  • Are you ready to take action?

 Join experienced Sound Alliance community organizers and students from across the Health Sciences this fall in UCONJ 624. We will develop your skills in advocacy and community organizing for health equity. Participate in different campaigns that work upstream to address the social determinants of health.

 Learn the fundamentals of advocacy, organizing, and their ability to impact health.

  • Apply skills, gain confidence, & collaborate around a community-driven goal.
  • Work with local leaders to engage in community driven listening campaigns.
  • Address the social & structural injustices that contribute to & perpetuate health disparities.

 Course details

  • Fall quarter 2018
  • Thursdays 5:30-7:20pm
  • Classroom: TBD

 Contact Leonora Clarke at clarkel@uw.ed for an add code or with questions! 

more info...

This course is taught by James Bernard and explores the intersection of policy, technology and society. Technology is rapidly changing the way that humans interact with one another, markets are formed, and information is stored, shared and utilized. While technology has held and does hold great promise for being a force for both economic and social change, it also has the potential to be used in ways that threaten civil liberties, national security and data sovereignty. Private sector and civil society actors, government and military leaders, and regulators must work together to understand how new and emerging technologies will drive change across a wide range of sectors, and they must develop policies to ensure that technology is used to help improve and enrich the lives of those across the socioeconomic spectrum.

 

JSIS 535: Society, Technology, and the Future

SLN 14512

T/Th 8:30-10:20a

Summer A-term

2 credits

more info...

The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards will be offering an online information session next Tuesday, providing an introductory overview of several scholarship programs supporting students interested in foreign affairs-related studies & careers. These are primarily undergraduate-focused programs, but all are welcome to join to learn more. Please share with those interested in foreign service careers and international affairs-related research:

 

Foreign Affairs Fellowships Information Session: Pickering, Rangel, PPIA, Payne, Carnegie, Humanity in Action fellowships & more!

Tuesday, June 19, 5:30pm

This session will be conducted online via Zoom. RSVP to attend and we'll send you the link to the online meeting: https://expo.uw.edu/expo/rsvp/event/311

 

Description: There are a variety of foreign affairs fellowship programs that provide funding for academic and professional preparation for undergraduate students and alumni considering international careers. Some fellowships prepare students specifically to enter the U.S. Department of State Foreign Service (Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program, Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship, Donald M. Payne International Development Graduate Fellowship Program), representing America’s interests abroad. Others provide research experience (Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Junior Fellowship Program). And still others have broader goals of expanding participation in public policy (Public Policy & International Affairs Program) and exploring national histories of discrimination and resistance (Humanity in Action Fellowships).

 

Join us for an introduction to these program and application processes. Deadlines will be coming up in the early fall for many, so summer is a great time to be working on applications!

more info...


Recruiting Health Science Students for the Seattle/King County Clinic “Listening Project”

Are you a health profession student at the University of Washington?
Are you interested in learning with and from students in other professions?
Are you looking for opportunities to learn more about the social determinants of health, through interfacing with community members facing challenges related to accessing health care?   
 
If you answered yes to any of the questions above, please keep reading!
 
The UW Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education is partnering with the Seattle/King County Clinic (SKCC) to engage interprofessional student teams as volunteers at the September 2018 4-day clinic.

The “Listening Project” is in response to the clinic’s efforts to better understand the patient populations served. Small student groups will circulate clinic waiting areas, engaging with patients who wish to share their stories related to their health, accessing care, or their experience at the SKCC. Stories will be synthesized and prepared for dissemination to the SKCC, as well as city and state policy makers. 

Students will be asked to sign up for one half-day shift during the days of clinic operation—September 20-23, 2018.

If you are interested in participating, please contact Nicole Woodard nwoodard@uw.edu.

About SKCC:

SKCC brings together healthcare organizations, civic agencies, non-profits, private businesses and volunteers from across the State of Washington to produce a giant free health clinic in KeyArena at Seattle Center.  The four-day volunteer-driven clinic provides a full range of free dental, vision and medical care to underserved and vulnerable populations in the region. The next Clinic is scheduled for September 20 – 23, 2018.
 
https://vimeo.com/124850873

more info...

OBSSR in coordination with a number of NIH Institutes and Centers and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, are hosting the Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH) to provide participants with a thorough grounding in conducting dissemination and implementation (D&I) research in health across all areas of health and health care. In 2018, the institute will utilize a combination of a 4-month online course (six modules with related assignments) between August 13 and November 30 , 2018, and a 2-day in-person training to be held December 6-7, 2018, in Bethesda, MD. Faculty and guest lecturers will consist of leading experts in theory, implementation, and evaluation approaches to D&I; creating partnerships and multilevel, transdisciplinary research teams; research design, methods, and analyses appropriate for D&I; and conducting research at different and multiple levels of intervention (e.g., clinical, community, policy). Participants will be expected to return to their home institutions prepared to share what they have learned at the institute to help further the field of D&I research (e.g., giving talks, leading seminars, forming new collaborations, mentoring, submitting D&I grant proposals, etc.).

Applications are due on June 12, 2018 12:00 p.m. ET. 

 

https://www.scgcorp.com/tidirh2018/index.html 

more info...

The Latino/a Educational Achievement Project (LEAP) is happy to announce that the applications for next year’s cohort (2018-2019) LEAP Ambassadors is now open!

The newly-redefined LEAP Ambassadors program is a year-long leadership development experience intended to ignite lifelong civic participation in young Latino leaders from across the state. Once selected as Ambassadors, students ranging in age from high school juniors through college seniors will engage in workshops and long-term collaborative projects throughout the year. Along with a cohort of their peers, students will explore concepts of civic engagement, leadership, advocacy, and government process while gaining career experience.

True to the re-envisioned mission of LEAP, the new Ambassadors curriculum is rooted in identity empowerment and the solidarity of community. Part of the goal of the program is to generate a space in which students feel connected to one another, to their cultural roots, and to their own identity, and facilitators work to create this space through a combination of one-day and overnight retreat workshops.

This is a great opportunity for Latino students who have demonstrated leadership in their communities and want to continue being a part of a strong movement. Students who complete the program will be offered a scholarship for their higher education.

For more information please visit our website: www.leapwa.org

Here is the direct link the application: https://form.jotform.com/81265626375159

The deadline is June 30th, 2018! Please share this great opportunity with any students who you believe would be a great fit.

SOC W 573, SOC W 598B & SOC W 598E

Posted: June 6, 2018

more info...

Soc W 573: Child Welfare and Permanency with Gerilyn Myers

Class meets: Mondays, 6-8:50 pm full-term

SLN: 13462

All grad students, undergrad juniors and seniors can register.

Description: Focus on social work interventions within the public child welfare system for children who have been abused and neglected. Includes practice models to ensure safety and permanency for children, federal and state mandates for permanency, cultural determinants, Juvenile Court dependency system, and research findings pertaining to permanency planning outcomes.


Soc W 598B: DSM V and Public Child Welfare Services with Gerilyn Myers

Classes meets: Fridays, 6/22, 7/13, 7/27, & 8/17 between 9:40am-4:30pm

SLN:13463

All grad students, undergrad juniors and seniors can register.

Description: This course will focus on understanding the use of DSM V as a diagnostic tool in mental health status and parenting evaluations in Child Welfare cases. These evaluations are generally sought

or court ordered in dependency cases where there is a question as to the parent or custodial guardian’s capacity to parent children who have been subject to child abuse or neglect. Intended course outcomes include: refining critical thinking and understanding of all elements of diagnostic assessment and diagnosis as it relates to child welfare and custody decisions in dependency cases. Examine and expand understanding of the definition of Culture in Diagnosis as defined in the DSM-V and related implications in parenting and mental health status evaluations. Explore the methodological challenges in this work across gender and ethnic communities. Group exercises, case studies, literature reviews, presentations, and, if appropriate, film will be used to compliment class instruction. This course does not replace the Soc W 571 requirement, nor do you need to have taken that course before, but it’s helpful.


Soc W 598E: SBIRT/Motivational interviewing with Elizabeth Wierman

Class meets: Thursdays, 6-8:50pm, full term

SLN: 14516

All grad students, undergrad juniors and seniors can register.

Description: This class will provide students with a thorough understanding of the evidence base supporting SBIRT and the steps involved in conducting screening, assessments, brief interventions, and referrals to treatment for problematic substance use.  Students will develop familiarity with commonly used screening and assessment instruments, gain experience conducting brief interventions, and learn about the process of making effective referrals to treatment. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing competency in using of motivational interviewing in brief interventions.

more info...

 

Osage University Partners, a VC fund which works closely with UW CoMotion and invests exclusively in startups coming out of universities and research institutes is offering consultation appointments to UW teams who have formed startups or interested in forming startups to commercialize the results of their research to share their experiences from working with startups based on technologies from university research.

 

Wednesday, June 6, at CoMotion Labs @ Fluke Hall – 3rd floor

Time slots are for 30 minutes between 9:00AM - 1:00PM

 

To request a 30-minute time slot, sign-up here

IECMH courses offered

Posted: May 24, 2018

more info...

These IECMH courses are being offered autumn 2018 and winter and spring 2019 (see below and attached flyer):

 Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH)

 ■ Fall 2018

IECMH 537 Attachment and Psychopathology: Parents & Infants

– Learn about the intergenerational transmission of caregiver-child relationship dynamics in more vulnerable families and implications for functioning at all ages.

 Winter 2019

IECMH 555 Relationship-Based Mental Health Assessment of Young Children

– Use a diversity and developmentally-informed lens to gain a solid foundation in observation, assessment and diagnosis of early childhood social, emotional and behavioral problems (birth – five).

 ■ Spring 2019

IECMH 548 Frameworks in Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health

– Develop foundational knowledge in the growing field of IECMH, including typical and atypical child development and risk and resiliency factors that shape life span trajectories.

 Open to University of Washington graduate students and community graduate non-matriculated (GNM) students. If interested in learning more, see our website or contact the Faculty Lead on IECMH, Dr. Colleen O. Dillon (codillon@uw.edu)  at the Barnard Center.

more info...

Instructor: Jason Smith
Meets: Wednesdays, 5:20-8:00 pm; B-term, July 25-August 15
Description: This workshop is intended to help students understand the capabilities that the United States military can bring to the world of international development and humanitarian crisis response. Development work in today’s world is very complex. Whether you work for an NGO, IGO, OGO, or a private company, you could potentially be in a situation where you could require military support or benefit from the resources the military can offer. With the U.S. led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, along with the recent standing up of Africa Command, the United States military has found itself more involved in work that is outside its primary mission. Good or bad, this has become reality.

This course will focus on the following topics: U.S. military doctrine and ability to task organize for specific missions; specialized units and logistics capability; permissive versus non-permissive environments; and, military limitations and challenges. In addition to these topics, this workshop will look at the different Combatant Commands (COCOMS) and explore some of the unique challenges and possible opportunities that exist.

more info...

Instructor: Nancy Lee
Meets: Wednesdays, 10:20-1:00 pm; A-term, June 20, 27, July 11, 18
Description: Students with degrees in Public Administration often find themselves in jobs that involve responsibilities to influence citizen behaviors. These efforts traditionally rely on one of two options: Information or Laws. This workshop introduces a third option, Social Marketing, one that most often results in the highest return on investment of resources. This proven strategy has been used to improve public health (e.g., increase physical activity); reduce injuries (e.g., senior fall prevention); protect the environment (e.g., food waste composting); and engage communities (e.g., increasing informed voting). Students will learn what distinguishes the social marketing approach, when it is the best option, and become familiar with a 10 Step Planning model for developing a successful social marketing campaign. Behavior change theories, including ones such as Behavioral Economics, and tactics, such as using social media, will be discussed, as well as the importance of, and techniques for, audience research.