SPH in the News

Headlines featuring UW SPH people and research.

March 28, 2020
The Atlantic
Karlena Dawson is at high risk of complications from COVID-19. Where she lives makes her even more vulnerable: a Seattle immigrant-detention center. Dr. Marc Stern, affiliate assistant professor of health services, is mentioned.
March 27, 2020
Quartz
Should you wear a mask to stop the coronavirus? Depending on where you live, the act risks social censure, accusations of selfishness, and perhaps the infection itself. Dr. Jared Baeten, professor of global health and epidemiology, is quoted.
March 30, 2020
The Seattle Times
Researchers around the globe and in Seattle are investigating dozens of other promising ideas, from repurposing old drugs to designing new ones. And they’re doing it at unprecedented speeds. Dr. Ruanne Barnabas, associate professor of global health and of medicine at the UW; Dr. Helen Chu, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology and global health, is quoted.
March 5, 2020
The Seattle Times
To contain the impact of COVID-19, state and local health officials on Wednesday released recommendations for certain populations to stay home and avoid large gatherings, and that employers should enable telecommuting where possible. Janet Baseman, associate dean and professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
March 5, 2020
Business Insider
Trader Joe's is changing its sick-leave policy during the coronavirus outbreak to encourage workers to stay home if they feel ill, according to a memo viewed by Business Insider. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health science, is quoted.
March 24, 2020
MSNBC
Dr. Ann Marie Kimball, professor emeritus of epidemiology, is interviewed by MSNBC about shortages in personal protective equipment across the country and how that endangers health care workers and volunteers.
March 26, 2020
KING 5
A new study from the University of Washington is helping clear the way for faster coronavirus testing, while also helping protect health care workers and preserve personal protective equipment. Gerard Cangelosi, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 4, 2020
KUOW
CVS has been sold out of masks for weeks; Costco keeps running out of toilet paper. Could this panic-induced behavior make the pandemic worse? Nicole Errett, lecturer in environmental and occupational health sciences, is interviewed. [This story is the third segment on this episode of "The Record"]
March 25, 2020
The Seattle Times
When Gov. Jay Inslee on Monday shut down many businesses, banned gatherings and ordered Washingtonians to stay at home, he said the restrictions will remain in place for at least two weeks. But public health experts say there’s nothing particularly significant about a two-week interval. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, a UW professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, and Dr. Judith Wasserheit, professor of global health and of medicine, are quoted.
March 25, 2020
My Northwest
As the numbers across the country of those who have tested positive for COVID-19 continue to rise, Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, director of the UW MetaCenter for Pandemic Preparedness and a UW professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, issued a warning.
March 24, 2020
The Hill
A tsunami of coronavirus victims that is overwhelming health systems in Italy offers a frightening preview of what could lie ahead for the United States as case counts grow and hospitals run out of space and equipment to treat those with severe symptoms. Janet Baseman, professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
March 23, 2020
Chinook Observer
With COVID-19 spreading, criminal justice institutions across Washington must start downsizing the number of incarcerated people, says Dr. Marc Stern, affiliate assistant professor of health services.
March 24, 2020
GeekWire
Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that’s on a lot of people’s minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? Nicole Errett, a lecturer of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 26, 2020
The Spokesman-Review
As the United States heads deeper into spring, it has been suggested that warmer temperatures will halt the spread of the new coronavirus and the COVID-19 disease it causes. Several small, preliminary studies indicate the virus could follow a pattern similar to flu and cold viruses, which significantly wane as the weather warms up. Gerard Cangelosi, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 26, 2020
The New York Times
Japan has puzzled epidemiologists as it has avoided the grim situations in places like Italy and New York without draconian restrictions on movement, economically devastating lockdowns or even widespread testing. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, a professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and global health, is quoted.
March 25, 2020
KOMO News
While pregnant women are included in those thought to be at high risk for COVID-19, not much is actually known yet about the virus' potential impacts on pregnancy. Dr. Kristina Adams Waldorf, an adjunct professor in global health, is quoted.
March 27, 2020
The New York Times
President Trump said on Tuesday that he wanted to reopen the country for business by Easter, on April 12, despite widespread warnings from public health experts that the worst effects of the coronavirus were still weeks away and that lifting the restrictions now in place would result in unnecessary deaths. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 4, 2020
The Seattle Times
On Wednesday, King County began advising companies to let employees work remotely to reduce the risk of workplace transmission of the virus. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 5, 2020
KOMO News
With King County recommending that those at higher risk from Coronavirus consider staying at home for at least three weeks and others who could find themselves someday in a two-week home quarantine, making sure you're set on food and supplies ahead of time is key. Anne-Marie Gloster, lecturer in the UW Nutritional Sciences Program, is quoted.
March 4, 2020
The Columbian
Vice President Mike Pence said Wednesday the U.S. is supposed to see increased testing for COVID-19 this week, but only after the federal government received criticism for its initial outbreak reaction. Paul Drain, assistant professor of global health, is quoted.
March 4, 2020
The Seattle Times
The Washington State Department of Health laboratory in Shoreline isn’t billing for COVID-19 tests at this time. Aaron Katz, principal lecturer in health services, is quoted.
March 5, 2020
The Seattle Times
"As the numbers of local coronavirus cases and deaths grow inexorably, Seattle-area citizens are paying the awful price of President Donald Trump’s disdain for science," writes Michael Riordan for The Seattle Times. Work by Trevor Bedford, an affiliate associate professor of epidemiology, is referenced.
March 17, 2020
CBC News
Data released by governments and citizens worldwide is helping researchers respond faster for the COVID-19 pandemic. Allison Black, a graduate student in epidemiology, is quoted.
March 18, 2020
The Seattle Times
"Losing daily routines, along with Washington’s now-shuttered recreational facilities, could also worsen the physical inactivity crisis, already contributing to nearly 1 in 10 U.S. deaths," write Katherine Hoerster, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Dori Rosenberg, affiliate associate professor of health services.
March 17, 2020
The Hill
"Recently, CDC officials encouraged people to have a 2-week stock of their medications. Unfortunately, for people taking medications for opioid use disorder, this simply may not be possible — without critical federal intervention," write Caleb Banta-Green, affiliate associate professor of health services at the UW, Regina LaBelle of Georgetown University, and Dr. Yngvild Olsen, of the American Society of Addiction Medicine.
March 18, 2020
Crosscut
The region is fighting to get ahead of the pandemic with recycled masks and ad hoc medicine. Dr. Wesley Van Voorhis, professor of medicine, is quoted.
March 17, 2020
Gizmodo
For many people in the U.S. who fear they’re already sick with COVID-19, the past few weeks have been a confusing maze of bureaucracy and inadequacy, only to be told at the end that they won’t be able to get tested. Anne Massey, a graduate student in epidemiology, is quoted.
March 18, 2020
Grist
More than 50 years ago, scientists at the Permanente Foundation Hospital in Oakland started a simple experiment: When a pregnant woman would come in for routine maternal care, they were asked to give a sample of blood, to be frozen for future research. They didn’t know it at the time, but those samples would later be key in understanding the long-term health impacts of the then widely-used pesticide DDT. Dr. Sheela Sathyanarayana, adjunct associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 19, 2020
The Verge
Juliana Pino usually fights to push polluters out of the Little Village neighborhood of Chicago, an industrial area with a big Latino community. Now, amid the ongoing novel coronavirus pandemic, she and her colleagues are also checking in on their elderly neighbors. Anjum Hajat, assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
March 18, 2020
KOMO News
People are still encouraged to practice proper social distancing, but one expert says these strict guidelines might not be in place for an extreme period of time. Ann Marie Kimball, professor emeritus of epidemiology, is interviewed.
March 19, 2020
Vox
In an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus, cities and states are implementing new restrictions, seemingly every hour. The most effective tool is for everyone to stay home, but that’s a tough ask, especially when you’re living with young kids. Meghan McGinty, affiliate assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 19, 2020
HealthDay
The novel coronavirus appears to be seasonal in nature, with major outbreaks occurring mainly in regions that match a specific set of climate conditions, a new study argues. Dr. Elizabeth Halloran, a professor of biostatistics and of epidemiology, is quoted.
March 19, 2020
The New York Times
In many crises, people quickly come out to lend a hand. With coronavirus, however, we are being told to keep our hands to ourselves. Yet for some people, the idea of doing nothing is not acceptable. Nicole Errett, lecturer of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 6, 2020
Crosscut
It’s only been in the past few days that some state and academic labs have received a green light to provide testing for COVID-19, and there’s still broad confusion over who can get tested, and where. Now some Seattleites are exploring ways to empower their neighbors to take health into their own hands. Wesley Van Voorhis, adjunct professor of global health, is quoted.
March 2, 2020
The Seattle Times
A campaign in Seattle led by the advocayc group Working Washington says workers on delivery apps such as Uber Eats should be paid minimum wage. PhD student Trevor Peckham from the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, who studies working conditions, weighs in.
March 16, 2020
The New York Times
As the coronavirus spreads across the globe, it appears to be setting off a devastating feedback loop with another of the gravest forces of our time: economic inequality. Nicole Errett, lecturer of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
March 16, 2020
Crosscut
Advocates who fear for the safety of fragile immigrants being held at the ICE detention center in Tacoma filed a lawsuit Monday demanding all detainees at high risk for coronavirus be released. Dr. Marc Stern, affiliate assistant professor of health services, is quoted.
March 16, 2020
The New York Times
For every known case of coronavirus, another five to 10 cases are out there undetected, a new study suggests. Dr. Elizabeth Halloran, a professor of biostatistics and of epidemiology, is quoted.
March 3, 2020
Los Angeles Times
As the coronavirus spreads throughout the country, health officials say hand-washing is one of the best ways people can protect themselves. After using the bathroom, touching your face or sneezing and before eating, scrub with soap and water for 20 seconds — or about the time it takes to sing “Happy Birthday” twice — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends. Janet Baseman, a professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
March 5, 2020
Science News
As a new coronavirus that has infected tens of thousands around the world continues to spread, scientists and public health officials are racing to understand the virus and stop the growing public health crisis. Work by Trevor Bedford, an affiliate associate professor of epidemiology, is referenced.
March 4, 2020
The News Tribune
Amid the spread of COVID-19, restaurants continue to follow standard food safety measures, enforced by local health departments and routine inspections, according to county, state and federal agencies. Additionally, there have been no reports of the virus being spread through food or food packaging, according to the most recent supply chain update on Feb. 27 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Anne-Marie Gloster, lecturer of epidemiology and nutritional sciences, is quoted.
March 5, 2020
The Guardian
As Washington state faces a rapidly evolving coronavirus outbreak, which has already claimed nine lives there, residents on Tuesday reported a frustrating array of misinformation and obstacles as they were seeking to get tested. Janet Baseman, professor of epidemiology at the UW, is quoted.
March 3, 2020
Newsweek
In 2016, About $3.1 trillion was spent on healthcare in the United States, in 2016. Joseph Dieleman, adjunct associate professor of global health, is quoted.
March 3, 2020
Newsweek
COVID-19 was identified in humans only two months ago, but experts are impressed by the level of information that's available. They speculate that the response could create a precedent for future outbreaks. Peter Rabinowitz, a professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and global health, and Nicole Errett, a lecturer of environmental and occupational health sciences, are quoted.
February 27, 2020
Business Insider
The huge amount of carbon dioxide we are producing and pumping into the Earth's atmosphere is causing much more damage than previously thought. Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
February 26, 2020
MYNorthwest
Fears of a coronavirus pandemic have spurred a run on face masks worn to reduce chances of inhaling the airborne virus from someone else’s coughs and sneezes. Peter Rabinowitz, a professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and global health, is quoted.
February 28, 2020
The New York Times
Even asymptomatic people who are infected may be able to spread the novel coronavirus. But people without symptoms are rarely tested. Judith N. Wasserheit, chair and professor of global health, is quoted.
February 27, 2020
STAT News
Among the many, many unknowns about the new coronavirus: What role do children play in transmission of the virus that causes COVID-19 disease? Jeffrey Duchin, adjunct professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
February 28, 2020
Business Insider
The novel coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China, has continued spreading, infecting over 83,000 people around the world, most of whom are in China. Marissa Baker, an assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
February 28, 2020
Newsweek
While research into COVID-19 has progressed at an impressive speed, according to experts, gaps remain in the world's knowledge about the virus, including information about how it spreads. Peter Rabinowitz, a professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and global health, is quoted.
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