SPH in the News

Headlines featuring UW SPH people and research.

February 24, 2021
KUOW
Esther Min, a research consultant with the UW’s Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, talks about how a new COVID-19 mapping tool combines census information and data from the CDC to help Seattle understand which communities are at the greatest risk during the pandemic.
February 17, 2021
HealthDay
When Khadijah Ameen and her fellow health activists gather in community groups in Martin Luther King Jr.’s hometown of Atlanta, everyone is in a circle. It connects to their central message: achieving a society in which all Black lives matter means Black health must matter, too. Clarence Spigner, professor of health services, is quoted.
February 18, 2021
CNN
The federal agency responsible for protecting workers did little to hold nursing homes accountable for dangerous conditions during the coronavirus pandemic until it was too late, its own records show. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
February 13, 2021
The Seattle Times
Lawmakers are again attempting to limit lead in Washington schools’ drinking water by requiring school districts to fix or replace fixtures that leach the toxin. This is the third year in a row that state Rep. Gerry Pollet, D-Seattle, a clinical instructor of health services, has introduced a measure aimed at curbing children’s exposure to lead.
February 17, 2021
MSN
In 2020, the number of Amer¬icans with food insecurity jumped from an already-¬whopping 35 million to a projected 50.4 million, a level not seen since the Great Depres¬sion. And that ¬dramatic spike did not hit every¬one equally. Adam Drewnowski, professor of epidemiology and director of the Nutritional Sciences Program, is quoted.
January 28, 2021
HuffPost
Retailers sell disinfectant sprays that claim to kill germs and eliminate odor, but do they work as well as simply washing? And could they be harmful to our health? Scott Meschke, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
January 26, 2021
MyNorthwest
Washington Rep. Pramila Jayapal joined Congressional Democrats on Tuesday to introduce a bill that would raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025. Two studies by the UW School of Public Health are referenced. James Buszkiewicz, a research scientist in nutritional sciences, is quoted.
January 27, 2021
KUOW
King County’s health officer says a contagious new strain of coronavirus detected in Western Washington will lead to a “Mount St. Helens-like eruption of cases.” Judith Malmgren, affiliate assistant professor of epidemiology, is interviewed on the “Seattle Now” podcast.
January 27, 2021
Vox
The outing of those who blatantly flout health guidelines and put others in danger can feel satisfying. But if you ask public health experts, as satisfying as chastening others can feel, they’ve learned it can actually do harm when it comes to an urgent public health crisis. Jennifer Balkus, assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 26, 2021
King 5 News
Can you still spread coronavirus, even after you’ve been vaccinated? Unfortunately, the answer is: yes. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and of global health, is interviewed.
January 24, 2021
BestLife
As new, more transmissible strains of COVID continue to emerge, many experts have urged people to get higher-quality masks. While it's true that almost any mask is better than no mask at all, some face coverings don't provide adequate protection to keep you safe from coronavirus, especially with the new variants making their rounds. According to experts, there are four masks that offer superior protection. Martin Cohen, teaching professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
January 24, 2021
The New York Times
The coronavirus pandemic in the United States has raged almost uncontrollably for so long that even if millions of people are vaccinated, millions more will still be infected and become ill unless people continue to wear masks and maintain social distancing measures until midsummer or later, according to a new model by scientists at Columbia University. Trevor Bedford, affiliate associate professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 21, 2021
Seattle P-I
As coronavirus cases tick up across King County, the “twindemic” public health officials had feared in anticipation of flu season hasn’t materialized. In fact, the flu appears to be barely spreading at all this season in King County. Janet Baseman, professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 20, 2021
The Guardian
Coronavirus vaccines may need to be redesigned this year to boost protection against a new variant that emerged rapidly out of South Africa, research suggests, while past COVID-19 sufferers may not be protected against reinfection. Trevor Bedford, affiliate associate professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 19, 2021
Mother Jones
Federal data show that the highest rates of heat-related illnesses are in neighborhoods with a history of racial segregation. Experts say racist policies of the past created conditions, never corrected, that make heat more dangerous for people there today. Dr. Howard Frumkin, professor emeritus of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
January 18, 2021
Public News Service
With cold and rainy winter settling in, many Washingtonians are counterintuitively feeling the urge to dine out. But COVID-19 cases continue to surge, and some outdoor solutions restaurants have created to battle the elements pose risks. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
January 20, 2021
KOMO News
A record surge in deadly drug overdoses in King County is worrying public health authorities. And experts believe the pandemic has a lot to do with it. Caleb Banta-Green, a research scientist at the UW Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute and affiliate associate professor of health services, is interviewed.
January 14, 2021
The Seattle Times
“There is something we can do to prevent escalating violence while at the same time protecting individual rights, including Second Amendment rights, and that is to use existing laws to lessen the risk of the potential firearm-related injury and harm caused by insurrectionists,” write the UW’s Fred Rivara, adjunct professor of epidemiology; Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, associate professor of epidemiology; and Monica Vavilala, professor of pediatrics and of anesthesiology and pain medicine.
January 15, 2021
CNBC
A new coronavirus variant identified in Brazil has exacerbated concern among public health experts, and led to warnings that additional new strains are likely to develop. Trevor Bedford, affiliate associate professor of epidemiolog, is quoted.
January 15, 2021
National Geographic
Early research suggests that SARS-CoV-2 has not mutated enough to render current vaccines ineffective, but scientists say that monitoring future viral evolution will be crucial. Dr. Helen Chu, adjunct associate professor of epidemiology and global health, is quoted.
January 15, 2021
WBUR
President-elect Joe Biden tapped Dr. David Kessler, a former head of the FDA, to lead the federal government’s COVID-19 vaccination efforts for the incoming administration. Dr. Helen Chu, adjunct associate professor of epidemiology and global health, is interviewed.
January 6, 2021
Fast Company
States have 15 million doses. They’ve only given out 4.5 million. This is the series of cascading failures that have taken the country to the point where vaccines may expire before we can give them out. Janet Baseman, associate dean of public health practice at the UW School of Public Health and professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 8, 2021
KIRO Radio
Dr. Helen Chu, adjunct associate professor of global health and epidemiology, has been named Washingtonian of the Year by Lieutenant Governor Cyrus Habib’s office.
January 8, 2021
KUOW
Last year, when it became clear that 2020 would be like no other, a group of University of Washington professors launched a program for freshmen called “2020: The Course.” The article links to a video featuring Hilary Godwin, dean of the UW School of Public Health.
January 11, 2021
Q13 Fox
As COVID-19 runs rampant in the Puget Sound, University of Washington scientists are tracking the virus in the one place most of us want nothing to do with — the sewer. The UW’s Sarah Philo, a doctoral student in environmental and occupational health sciences, and Scott Meschke, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, are interviewed. Angelo Ong, a research scientist in environmental and health sciences, is featured.
January 11, 2021
Popular Science
Restaurants in colder climates are serving people inside structures that mimic everything from backyard sheds to bouncy castles. When it comes to COVID-19 transmission, does eating in your own personal hamster ball, igloo or dog house count as eating outside? Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
January 11, 2021
CNN
There is no evidence the United States has a homegrown variant of coronavirus that’s fueling the recent increased spread of the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday. Trevor Bedford, affiliate associate professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 30, 2020
Seattle P-I
The University of Washington is recruiting 1,000 volunteers for a phase 3 clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine. Dr. Scott McClelland, professor of global health and of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 4, 2021
KGW
UW Medicine is looking for volunteers for phase 3 of a clinical trial of Novavax. Dr. Anna Wald, professor of epidemiology, is interviewed.
December 31, 2020
Bloomberg
Among developed nations, the U.S. stands out after a year marred by virus denial, conspiracy, mask politicization and disregard for rules even at the highest levels of government. Stocks touched record highs while millions lost jobs. Even as vaccines are rushed via trucks and planes to those most vulnerable, U.S. hospitals are growing busier by the day. Stephen Bezruchka, associate teaching professor of health services, is quoted.
December 30, 2020
KOMO News
Researchers are concerned that a new COVID-19 strain that is more easily passed from person to person could already be on U.S. soil. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is interviewed.
December 29, 2020
Q13 Fox
Maryland-based Novavax is currently conducting a phase 3 trial on its COVID-19 vaccine. Researchers at the UW are currently looking for 1,000 participants to take part in the trial. The UW’s Dr. Anna Wald, professor of medicine, of epidemiology, and of laboratory medicine and pathology, and Dr. Scott McClelland, professor of global health and of epidemiology, are quoted.
December 16, 2020
Crosscut
Seattle police rarely enforce the law that bikers must wear a helmet. When they do, it’s often against people struggling with homelessness. Dr. Fred Rivara, adjunct professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 21, 2020
Thompson Reuters
From poor families in flood-prone homes to women required to cover up in extreme heat, climate change will hit the health of vulnerable groups the hardest, warns Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and environmental and occupational health sciences.
December 18, 2020
Yahoo! News
Evidence is already emerging that online learning is leading to an education gap, one that is almost certainly growing wider by the week. Children aren’t just not learning, they are unlearning the things they had learned before the pandemic. Brandon Guthrie, assistant professor of global health and of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 20, 2020
The New York Times
Striking a compromise between two high-risk population groups, a panel advising the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voted Sunday to recommend that people age 75 and older be next in line to receive the coronavirus vaccine in the United States, along with about 30 million “front-line essential workers,” such as emergency responders, teachers and grocery store employees. Dr. Beth Bell, clinical professor of global health, is quoted.
December 22, 2020
Health Affairs
In this episode of the podcast "A Health Podyssey," Health Affairs editor-in chief Alan Weil interview Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences, on the complex relationship between climate change and human health.
December 22, 2020
KIRO Radio
Part one of an interview with James Buszkiewicz, a research scientist in the UW School of Public Health, on how and why food insecurity is on the rise during the COVID-19 pandemic.
December 21, 2020
KIRO Radio
Part two of an interview with James Buszkiewicz, a research scientist in the UW School of Public Health, on how and why food insecurity is on the rise during the COVID-19 pandemic.
December 21, 2020
KOMO Radio
A new strain of the novel coronavirus in the U.K. is raising concern, but scientists do not yet know how it will affect the pandemic. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is interviewed.
December 22, 2020
Seattle P-I
Researchers from the University of Washington, Washington State University and Tacoma Community College are starting a second round of food security surveys to find out how the coronavirus pandemic has impacted people's access to food and other resources. Jennifer Otten, associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 17, 2020
GeekWire
Greg Akselrod is partnering with Ian Mikutel, a former Microsoft colleague, to launch a startup called VacSeen. The company produces and distributes pro-vaccine bracelets. Aaron Katz, a principal lecturer emeritus in health services, is quoted.
December 17, 2020
KUOW
Millions traveled over Thanksgiving, despite government advice to stay home. People are in a bubble with friends and family, but they’re also taking risks. So is gathering more safely possible? Alison Drake, assistant professor of global health, is interviewed.
December 17, 2020
Q13 Fox
We’ve seen a lot of loss of life in Black and Latino communities impacted by COVID-19. The data is out there to prove it, so why are people of color still so hesitant to get the vaccine? Clarence Spigner, professor of health services, is quoted.
December 14, 2020
Chicago Sun Times
Do you buy too much in the supermarket, cook more food than your family can eat, or toss out restaurant leftovers? Once you know where your weaknesses are, you can shore them up. Jennifer Otten, associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 8, 2020
The Seattle Times
"The WA Notify exposure alerts will not rid the state of coronavirus. But the system is a tool that sometimes can alert people exposed to self-quarantine and seek testing. And that could limit the contagion’s spread. The more people use it on their phones, the more effective it will be," writes The Seattle Times Editorial Board. Janet Baseman, associate dean at the UW School of Public Health and professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 11, 2020
KOMO News
Dr. Anna Wald, professor of epidemiology, talks about how some people who take the COVID-19 vaccine may experience side effects. As a result, UW Medicine will stagger distribution of the vaccine to frontline workers to ensure that staffing levels are stable.
December 13, 2020
CNN
Thousands of vials of the long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine are slated to arrive in all 50 states Monday, as top US health officials express hope that health care workers can begin administering the injections immediately. Dr. Beth Bell, clinical professor of global health, is quoted.
December 13, 2020
KUOW
Proper mask-wearing, hand-washing, and other precautions taken at the individual level can help reduce person-to-person transmission of the coronavirus. But another, less visible variable is also at play: Ventilation. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 11, 2020
Men's Health
As more than two people were dying in the United States every minute from COVID-19, the Food and Drug Administration’s advisory panel voted on Thursday to recommend approval of the first vaccine for emergency use in people 16 and older. While the COVID-19 vaccine process has moved at an unprecedented pace, there are three strong reasons to trust that they are safe. Dr. Sonali Kochhar, clinical assistant professor of global health, is quoted.
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