SPH in the News

Headlines featuring UW SPH people and research.

February 13, 2020
The New York Times
The fourth-most popular beverage in the country, coffee is steeped into our culture. Just the right amount can improve our mood; too much may make us feel anxious and jittery. Dr. Jim Krieger, clinical professor of health services, is quoted.
February 11, 2020
Parents
A recent study found that one-third of rural boys reported carrying a handgun at least once between sixth grade and age 19, and 34 percent of the boys who reported carrying said they did so for the first time in sixth grade. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, associate professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
February 6, 2020
KOMO Radio
A bill making its way through the Washington legislature would require mandatory testing for lead at all schools. Steven Gilbert, affiliate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
February 6, 2020
KING 5
An article by Newsweek says a Chinese scientist working on the coronavirus claims pets can catch the infection. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and adjunct professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
February 6, 2020
King 5
There's a lot of weight loss advice on the internet, but not always backed by science. Judy Simon from the Nutritional Sciences Program busts five of the most popular diet myths out there.
February 10, 2020
The New York Times
Japan already had several confirmed coronavirus cases when a giant cruise ship arrived at the port of Yokohama last week. Now, with the disclosure that 61 people from that ship have tested positive for the virus, Japan is scrambling to prevent a larger outbreak even as it is also preparing to welcome hundreds of thousands of visitors for the Summer Olympics starting in Tokyo in July. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and adjunct professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
February 1, 2020
CBC
When the story of the coronavirus is finally written, it might well become a template for the utopian dream of open science — where research data is shared freely, unrestrained by competition, paywalls and patents. Trevor Bedford, affiliate assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
February 6, 2020
The Trace
Children living in poor areas are almost twice as likely to die by firearm suicide as those who reside in wealthier neighborhoods, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics. Dr. David Grossman, professor of health services who has done research on child suicide and firearms, said more research is needed on how doctors can influence families to store guns safely.
January 29, 2020
Science News
Scientists are racing to unravel the mysteries of a new coronavirus that has infected thousands and sparked global concern, triggering many questions from researchers and the public alike. In this rapidly evolving epidemic, many unknowns remain. Trevor Bedford, affiliate assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
February 4, 2020
TIME
A new coronavirus outbreak, which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan and has spread throughout Asia and globally, has prompted people around the world to buy medical face masks in hopes of preventing infection. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and global health, is quoted.
January 28, 2020
Fred Hutch News
A Q&A with public health researcher Dr. Ross Prentice, a professor of biostatistics, on how to assess and improve studies of diet and chronic disease.
January 31, 2020
The Journal of the San Juan Islands
Gun magazines that hold more than ten rounds of ammunition would be outlawed under a proposed law moving through the state Senate. Fred Rivara, adjunct professor of epidemiology, is quoted. [This WNPA story appeared in several regional outlets]
January 28, 2020
The Seattle Times
"All of us are at risk of firearm injury and death, including homicide and suicide. But children and adolescents, people struggling with mental-health issues or substance abuse, people living in poverty, communities of color and victims of domestic violence are at the greatest risk," write Dr. Fred Rivara, professor of pediatrics at the UW, and Dr. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, associate professor of epidemiology at the UW.
January 22, 2020
WIRED
Scientists are racing to understand just how bad things could get with a pneumonia-like disease that first appeared in China and has now spread to the U.S. Trevor Bedford, affiliate assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 21, 2020
The Everett Herald
The first case of Wuhan Coronavirus reported in the United States is a Snohomish County man in his 30s who traveled to China, federal and local officials announced Tuesday. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and global health, is quoted.
January 22, 2020
New Scientist
A new coronavirus that has claimed 17 lives in Wuhan, China, may have been transmitted to people from snakes, according to a genetic analysis. The snakes may have caught the virus from bats in the food market in which both animals were sold. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and global health, is quoted.
January 14, 2020
KIMA (CBS) News
With more snow predicted over the next few days in the Yakima Valley, health experts are advising parents to make sure their kids are wearing helmets while sledding. Dr. Beth Ebel, adjunct professor of epidemiology and health services, is quoted.
January 21, 2020
The New York Times
A mysterious virus has caused an international outbreak of respiratory illness. The infection has turned up in the U.S. and five other countries. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of global health and environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
January 17, 2020
Crosscut
While Australia's catastrophic bushfires rage, local scientists are beginning to understand how smoke exposure affects mortality in the Northwest. Annie Doubleday, who did the research as a UW graduate student in environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
January 13, 2020
KUOW
A new UW study reveals that 40% of gun owners have at least one unlocked firearm at home.
January 21, 2020
HealthDay News
Four in 10 gun owners have at least one gun at home that isn't locked up, even if there are children in the home, a new survey suggests. The study was conducted by researchers in the Departments of Global Health and Epidemiology.
January 13, 2020
Consumer Affairs
A new study conducted by researchers from the University of Washington found that nearly half of all gun owners are keeping their guns unlocked at home. Aisha King, who worked on the study as a graduate student in public health at the UW, is quoted.
January 14, 2020
Business Insider
At the start of each New Year, people make dramatic resolutions and typically fail to stick to them. Instead, you should be thinking about ways you can make small, positive changes to your life. Adam Drewnowski, director of the UW Center for Public Health Nutrition, is quoted.
January 9, 2020
The Daily
Today’s children face lifelong health effects from the global crisis, according to the Lancet Countdown, an international collaborative effort of 35 academic institutions and UN agencies from every continent to observe and monitor the health risks of climate change. Jeremy Hess and Kristie Ebi are quoted.
December 27, 2019
AP News
In less than a week, some kids in Washington state may need to remain in booster seats well into middle school. Beth Ebel, adjunct professor of epidemiology and health services, is quoted. [This AP story appeared in several outlets]
December 11, 2019
Crosscut
A yearlong investigation by the Center for Investigative Reporting that included the Yakima Valley found that supervisors often remained on the job for years after accusations of sexual assault. In 41 federal sexual harassment lawsuits against agricultural companies, almost 85% of the workers reporting the harassment faced retaliation. UW Bothell's Jody Early, an associate professor of nursing and health studies, and Victoria Breckwich Vásquez, an affiliate assistant professor of nursing and health studies, are quoted.
December 16, 2019
Epi News
A new, innovative UW study abroad program in Ethiopia leverages UW School of Public Health faculty's experiences in the country to build an interactive itinerary for undergraduate students, exposing them to global public health in practice.
December 26, 2019
U.S. News and World Report
Decades ago, Nat King Cole gently crooned about chestnuts roasting on an open fire. But since then, scientists have uncovered some troubling truths about wood smoke. Dr. Joel Kaufman, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 12, 2019
BuzzFeed News
Immigrants held in Immigration and Customs Enforcement jails around the U.S. received medical care so bad it resulted in two preventable surgeries, including an 8-year-old boy who had to have part of his forehead removed, and contributed to four deaths, according to an internal complaint from an agency whistleblower. Marc Stern, an affiliate assistant professor of health services, is quoted.
December 16, 2019
U.S. News and World Report
Experts say countries, states and cities are showing pathways to the global fight against AIDS. Dr. Jared Baeten, professor of global health, medicine and epidemiology, is quoted.
December 26, 2019
BBC
Growing fruit and vegetables in the garden is already seen as environmentally friendly, but it could also be a weapon in the fight against climate change. Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 26, 2019
Bonner County Daily Bee
Research led by PhD student Phillip Hwang from the Department of Epidemiology is featured in Sandpoint, Idaho's Daily Bee newspaper: The five things we learned about Alzheimer's in 2019.
December 18, 2019
The New York Times
In St. Louis, Seattle and San Francisco, people with opioid addictions can start anti-addiction medication on their first day of treatment. Early research suggests the approach can change lives. But it will be a tough sell elsewhere: Nearly two-thirds of U.S. treatment centers don’t offer anti-addiction drugs and there’s resistance to easy access. Caleb Banta-Green, affiliate associate professor, is quoted.
December 20, 2019
The Seattle Times
UW researchers found plane emissions are polluting communities near Sea-Tac Airport with a particularly worrisome type of “ultrafine” particles. Elena Austin, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 24, 2019
Global News
The United States military is warning its members against taking any popular direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry tests, citing privacy and surveillance concerns in a memo issued by top officials in the Department of Defense. Malia Fullerton, an adjunct professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 26, 2019
KNKX
A growing number of preschools are making it their mission to educate kids outside, and one scientist from Washington State University is trying to measure possible health benefits from outdoor play. Pooja Tandon is quoted.
December 6, 2019
Union of Concerned Scientists
A Union of Concerned Scientists lawsuit challenging the EPA’s policy banning anyone who has received agency funding from sitting on advisory committees got a hearing Dec. 3 in the First Circuit Court of Appeals in Massachusetts. Dr. Elizabeth A. (Lianne) Sheppard offered testimony.
December 6, 2019
WWNO
Climate change will affect today’s children at every stage of their life. That’s one of the takeaways from a new study from the Lancet Countdown, a project of the medical journal The Lancet. Co-author Jeremy Hess is quoted.
December 6, 2019
KUOW
Airplanes at Sea-Tac airport are polluting the communities below with tiny "ultrafine" particles that are uniquely from jets. That's according to UW’s first-of-its-kind research about the airport. Edmund Seto, associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is quoted.
November 22, 2019
The Seattle Times
"In the United States, clinical tests for hereditary cancer risk have been available for more than 25 years. Even so, patients typically undergo this family-risk screening after they receive a cancer diagnosis, rather than before," write the UW's Dr. Elizabeth Swisher, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, Dr. Barbara Norquist, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and Deborah Bowen, professor of bioethics and humanities and adjunct professor of health services.
December 3, 2019
Futurity
Exposure to cadmium, a known human carcinogen, even at levels found in people who do not smoke cigarettes, leads to accelerated cognitive impairment, according to a new animal study led by Zhengui Xia.
November 25, 2019
The Seattle Times
"Washington state legislators should consider new bicycle-safety recommendations from the National Transportation Safety Board," writes The Seattle Times Editorial Board. Fred Rivara, an adjunct professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
November 22, 2019
Yakima Herald
¡Basta! — which means “enough” in Spanish — Preventing Sexual Harassment in Agriculture is a bilingual resource that provides training for farmworkers, supervisors and growers. Victoria Breckwich Vásquez, an affiliate assistant professor at in the Department of Environmenta & Occupational Health Sciences, co-led the effort to develop the tool.
November 8, 2019
U.S. News and World Report
Mailing self-sampling kits to test for the cervical cancer-causing virus HPV significantly increased screening rates for the cancer, according to a new study. The lead author was Rachel Winer, a professor of epidemiology.
November 11, 2019
KOMO News
Right in the midst of the opioid crisis, another illicit drug has hit the streets of Seattle. Experts say it's more potent and deadly than other opiods. Caleb Banta-Green, affiliate associate professor of health services, is quoted.
November 15, 2019
World Economic Forum
Mailed self-sampling kits that test for HPV—the virus that can cause cervical cancer—helped significantly more women get screened for the cancer. The study's lead author was Rachel Winer, professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health and affiliate investigator at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute.
November 7, 2019
Self
Around 61,880 new cases of uterine cancer will be diagnosed by the end of 2019, according to the American Cancer Society. That makes it the most common cancer impacting female reproductive organs and the fourth most common cancer found in U.S. women. Dr. Kemi Doll,adjunct assistant professor of health services, is quoted.
November 4, 2019
Politico
What Americans eat is making them sick on a staggering scale, but judging by federal investment in nutrition research, Washington doesn’t seem to care. Mario Kratz, research associate professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
November 1, 2019
The Stranger
Researchers with Kaiser Permanente Northern California surveyed around 275,000 pregnant women in that region, and they found that from 2009 to 2017, pot use during pregnancy grew from 1.9 percent to 3.4 percent. The long-term effects of pot use during pregnancy are virtually unknown. Kristina Adams Waldorf is quoted.
October 10, 2019
The Daily
In recent months, vape-related illnesses have begun to dominate headlines, even though the products linked to these illnesses have been on the market for over a decade now. The sudden rise in such illnesses has naturally led many to question their vaping habits and whether they should continue huffing on chemicals or just enjoy regular air. Coralynn Sack is quoted.
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