SPH in the News

Headlines featuring UW SPH people and research.

July 29, 2020
Popsugar
Experts say the United States is still in the first wave of the novel coronavirus pandemic because, as of now, cases are spiking in some places across the country, especially in areas that were among the first to reopen. Janet Baseman, associate dean at the UW School of Public Health and professor of epidemiology, says until we all start thinking about COVID-19 from a community standpoint (“How can I protect myself and others?”) instead of a personal standpoint (“How can I protect myself?”), we aren’t going to see progress in decreasing community transmission.
July 27, 2020
Slate
An estimated half of U.S. children get braces, but some orthodontists question whether they’re medically necessary. Dr. Philippe Hujoel, professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
July 23, 2020
San Antonio Express-News
In the debate over when to reopen Texas school buildings, many advocates for resuming in-person classes have pointed to western Europe and eastern Asia, where several countries have started face-to-face instruction again and largely avoided surges of the novel coronavirus. The comparison, however, relies on a potentially dubious assumption: that Texas will get the same results as Denmark, France and Germany. Brandon Guthrie, assistant professor of global health and epidemiology, is quoted.
July 24, 2020
HuffPost
In the early days of the outbreak, differences between states had to do with the timing of the virus’ arrival in the U.S., and the speed with which various governors imposed quarantines. Now that governors have lifted their lockdown orders and reopened their economies, outbreaks are beginning to fall along political and economic lines. COVID-19 is increasingly becoming just another disease of inequality. Dr. Jared Baeten, vice dean of the UW School of Public Health and professor of global health and of epidemiology, is quoted.
July 24, 2020
HuffPost
In the early days of the outbreak, differences between states had to do with the timing of the virus’ arrival in the U.S., and the speed with which various governors imposed quarantines. Now that governors have lifted their lockdown orders and reopened their economies, outbreaks are beginning to fall along political and economic lines. COVID-19 is increasingly becoming just another disease of inequality. Dr. Jared Baeten, vice dean of the UW School of Public Health and professor of global health and of epidemiology, is quoted.
July 23, 2020
NBC News
Swabbing yourself at home for the coronavirus may be nearly as accurate as when the test is administered by health care workers, according to new UW research. Dr. Helen Chu, adjunct associate professor of epidemiology and of global health, is quoted.
July 25, 2020
Quartz
The collapse of the global birth rate should be encouraging for the fight against climate change: A new set of population projections published on July 14 by the UW Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation found that global population will peak in 2064, at 9.73 billion. The trouble is the timeline. The population isn’t shrinking fast enough to prevent a climate crisis. Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
July 25, 2020
The Seattle Times
Across the board, there’s no consistency in how cafes, wine bars and eateries are dealing with cases of infected employees or coronavirus safety issues because, restaurateurs say, there’s been very little direction from the state, and often murky instructions from county health departments. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
July 24, 2020
Marketplace
In the age of social distancing and other efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19, cities are grappling with whether to encourage vulnerable populations to leave their homes during extreme heat and congregate under a communal air-conditioning system or stay home and hope that the summer heat doesn’t make them sick. Kristie Ebi, professor of global health, is quoted.
July 27, 2020
WIRED
As school officials try to figure out whether to open classrooms this fall, the science they need to make these tough choices is still evolving. A few things are clear: That most kids don’t become as seriously ill from COVID-19 as adults, and have much lower fatality rates. A study by the Department of Global Health and guidelines drafted by Dimitri Christakis are referenced.
July 22, 2020
NPR Morning Edition
COVID-19 cases are on the rise across the country, and that's prompting city leaders in some of the hardest hit places — Seattle, Chicago and Atlanta — to consider closing down again. Hilary Godwin, dean of the UW School of Public Health, is quoted.
July 14, 2020
United Press International
With little data on the effects of COVID-19 in children — and their role in virus transmission — decisions on whether to open schools in the fall should be based on spread of the disease in local areas, experts said July 14. A report by global health experts at the UW is referenced.
July 17, 2020
Lonely Planet
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urges travelers to reconsider any non-essential travel. But if you do decide to hit the road this summer (should local laws allow it), there are a few things you can do to stay safe. Lonely Planet talked to a few experts, include Hilary Godwin, dean of the UW School of Public Health, to see what they had to say.
July 17, 2020
STAT News
For years, physicians and medical students, many of them Black, have warned that the most widely used kidney test — the results of which are based on race — is racist and dangerously inaccurate. Their appeals are gaining new traction, with a wave of petitions and papers calling renewed attention to the issue. Naomi Nkinsi, a recent MPH graduate student of the Department of Global Health, is quoted.
July 15, 2020
KUOW
The carefully followed death toll from COVID-19 may not fully capture the loss of life during the pandemic. Analysis of Washington state and federal statistics for deaths from all causes shows hundreds of additional deaths above normal levels this spring in the Pacific Northwest. Some or many of those may actually be missed COVID deaths. Anirban Basu, professor of health services, is quoted.
July 15, 2020
CNN
About a third of people with Alzheimer’s disease have access to a firearm in their home, according to a newly published survey of caregivers. Few caregivers, however, have discussed what to do when their loved ones are unfit to handle the guns. The UW’s Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, associate professor of epidemiology, and Erin Morgan, a doctoral student in epidemiology, are quoted.
July 14, 2020
Independent
The English government’s new messaging on face coverings has been criticized for appearing to promote a type of mask which fails to stop the wearer from spreading coronavirus to others. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
July 15, 2020
KUOW
COVID-19 cases are spiking around the country, especially in younger people. Judith Malmgren, affiliate assistant professor of epidemiology, looks at the data and cuts through the noise. [This is the first segment on the July 15 episode of “The Record.”]
July 10, 2020
Tacoma Weekly News
The University of Washington and Washington State University, with support from Tacoma Community College, have created the Washington State Food Security Survey to gain a better understanding of how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted economic security and food access for residents of the state. Adam Drewnowski and Jennifer Otten are leading the study.
July 10, 2020
The Washington Post
The novel coronavirus is clearly deadlier than the seasonal flu, despite President Trump’s ongoing efforts to downplay its risks. But how much more deadly? Figuring that out isn’t easy. Anirban Basu, professor of health services, is quoted.
July 9, 2020
VOX
As satisfying as it is to watch someone reprimanded for bad behavior, mask meltdown videos might not be an effective tool to change attitudes toward public health. And according to health and behavior experts, changing someone’s mind about masks is much more difficult than embarrassing them on candid camera. Dr. Jared Baeten, vice dean at the UW School of Public Health and professor of global health, is quoted.
July 11, 2020
The Hill
“Having ‘the talk’ — discussing racism and buffering children from racist experiences — is a task shouldered by families of color. Seldom do white parents have ‘the talk’ with their children about how they benefit from a system that privileges their whiteness,” write David Chae, Leoandra Onnie Rogers and Tiffany Yip. Anjum Hajat, assistant professor of epidemiology at the UW, is mentioned.
July 13, 2020
The Seattle Times
“As faculty and students at the University of Washington, we are appalled by the new federal directive that would impede international students from continuing their education at colleges and universities if classes are only held online,” write Jennifer Balkus, assistant professor of epidemiology; Chenglin Hong, a recent UW graduate; and Unmesha Roy Paladhi, a doctoral student of epidemiology.
July 13, 2020
Yahoo! Finance
Janet Baseman, professor of epidemiology, joins the “On the Move” panel to discuss how contact tracing is used to fight the spread of COVID-19.
July 10, 2020
The New York Times
Bit by bit, workouts, programs or seasons are canceled by conferences, throwing into question if it is worth having a season at all in a pandemic. Steve Mooney, assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
July 2, 2020
KNKX
Seattle researchers say a law that’s been on the books since 2016 in Washington is being underutilized and has the potential to prevent more people from being harmed by firearms. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, associate professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
July 2, 2020
The Seattle Times
When we think of waters that define Seattle, which ones come to mind? Puget Sound and Elliott Bay, with Lake Washington and Lake Union close behind. But what about the seemingly invisible Duwamish River, harnessed (some say ravaged) beyond original recognition and poisoned beyond palatability? Shouldn’t it rise to the top? That’s the question behind a new social and environmental history book with a provocative title: “The River That Made Seattle” by BJ Cummings, community engagement manager for the UW Superfund Research Program.
July 2, 2020
My Northwest
The Duwamish River is thousands of years old, and it’s been home to indigenous people for millennia. It’s also where European Americans first settled back in 1851, several months before the better-known Denny Party landed at Alki. BJ Cummings, community engagement manager for the UW Superfund Research Program, is the author of a new book from UW Press called “The River That Made Seattle: A Human and Natural History of The Duwamish.”
July 1, 2020
Uproxx
The Fourth of July weekend is upon us. The nation longs for a stress release and the chance to connect in person. People want to sip beers and eat barbecue. But we are also in the grips of a pandemic. While cities, parks and public spaces are continuing to reopen, the risk of infection is not necessarily lower by any means. The onus has simply shifted: Governments seem to be trusting their citizens to make decisions that will ensure their safety and the safety of others. Steve Mooney, assistant professor of epidemiology, is interviewed.
July 1, 2020
The Seattle Times
At least 80 students living in a dozen fraternity houses just north of the UW campus have reported testing positive for COVID-19, the coronavirus disease, with hundreds of results pending. Janet Baseman, associate dean and professor of epidemiology, is quoted. 
June 26, 2020
Associated Press
To assess the state of the public health system in the United States, Kaiser Health News and The Associated Press analyzed data on government spending and staffing at national, state and local levels. What reporters found was a mix of survey and budget data, each measuring a slightly different concept of “public health.” Betty Bekemeier, director of the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice, is quoted.
June 26, 2020
Vox
For the past three months, Americans across the country have been sheltering in place. Governors and mayors, taking the advice of health officials, shut down almost all activities to curb the spread of the coronavirus. That’s slowly changing as states and cities start to reopen — some, like Arizona and Florida, have already opened even in the face of rising case rates. Anne-Marie Gloster, lecturer of epidemiology, is quoted.
June 23, 2020
Knowable Magazine
Smoking, poor diet, lack of exercise? Yes, but that’s not all. Stephen Bezruchka, senior lecturer of health services and of global health is interviewed about what really hurts U.S. life expectancy.
June 24, 2020
The Seattle Times
Gov. Jay Inslee announced a statewide mandate requiring facial coverings in public to slow the spread of the new coronavirus, as cases again begin to rise in Washington. Dr. Jared Baeten, vice dean at the School of Public Health and professor of global health, is quoted.
June 23, 2020
International Business Times
The recent surge of coronavirus cases in the U.S. South and West created a new wrinkle for states looking to reopen and intensified concerns about a second wave. Florida, Arizona and Texas, in particular, emerged as major hotspots thanks to record numbers of new cases being reported almost daily. However, the most worrying trend officials have cited is the increase in cases among people in their 20s and 30s. Judith Malmgren, affiliate assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
June 23, 2020
Bloomberg
Masks are mandatory on subways and buses in Washington. San Francisco is betting longer trains will help riders social distance. Crews disinfect New York's trains daily — stations twice a day — and are testing ultraviolet light devices to see if they kill COVID-19 on surfaces. Hilary Godwin, dean of the UW School of Public Health, is quoted.
June 22, 2020
KING 5 News
Aside from cases, hospitalization and tests, the 'R' estimate — or reproductive number — helps show if COVID-19 is growing or shrinking in a community. Janet Baseman, assocaie dean at the School of Public Health and professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
June 19, 2020
NPR
As much of the country presses forward with reopening, a growing number of cities and states are finding that the coronavirus outbreak now has a foothold in a younger slice of the population, with people in their 20s and 30s accounting for a larger share of new coronavirus infections. Judith Malmgren, affiliate assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
June 21, 2020
Associated Press
Living conditions in the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman “are sub-human and deplorable in a civilized society,” according to Dr. Marc Stern, affiliate assistant professor of health services, who has evaluated the prison on behalf of inmates who are suing the state.
June 19, 2020
Science
Health departments around the world are betting on technology to help stem the stealthy spread of the coronavirus: cellphone apps that aim to identify and alert those who recently came into contact with an infected person. Allison Black, a doctoral student in epidemiology, is quoted.
June 19, 2020
The Washington Post
The minks on Dutch fur farms first got sick in mid-April. They had caught the novel coronavirus from human handlers, the government later said, and soon farmed minks appeared to have passed it back to two other people, in the world’s first reports of animal-to-human transmission since the pandemic began. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and director of the UW Center for One Health Research, is quoted.
June 18, 2020
Vice
Airlines are trying to create a new normal for safe pandemic flying, but customers are fighting back about wearing masks and leaving seats empty. Steve Mooney, assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
June 18, 2020
The New York Times
As much of the nation emerges from the cultural hibernation caused by the coronavirus, with varying degrees of concern and glee, American sports are now thrusting themselves headlong into the recovery effort. It is not going particularly well. Steve Mooney, assistant professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
June 15, 2020
Science
Nearly 40,000 people were killed by firearms in the United States in 2018, but curbing these numbers has been a statistically tricky — and politically fraught — problem. Now, a study that tracked individual gun laws over time suggests states can reduce gun deaths significantly by restricting three things: children's access to guns, concealed-carry permits and “stand your ground” policies. Dr. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, associate professor of epidemiology, is referenced.
June 16, 2020
Reuters
Americans have started returning to more normal lifestyles with the end of coronavirus lockdowns. But what activities are safe? Dr. Jared Baeten, vice dean at the School of Public Health and professor of global health, is quoted.
June 15, 2020
KUOW
Three UW clinical trials on hydroxychloroquine are continuing despite withdrawal of authorization. Ruanne Barnabas, associate professor of global health, explains how her study focuses on preventing transmission of COVID-19.
June 24, 2020
Popular Science
Heat waves are the most dangerous natural disaster — and they kill more people than we previously thought. Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and environmental and occupational health, is quoted.
June 24, 2020
KNKX
Adam Drewnowski, professor of epidemiology and director of the Center for Public Health Nutrition, has found that poorer areas have higher rates of disease. Now he's launching a survey to map where COVID-19 is hitting hardest to learn about the connection between infection and social disparities.
June 25, 2020
The New York Times
Invisible outbreaks sprang up everywhere. The United States ignored the warning signs. We analyzed travel patterns, hidden infections and genetic data to show how the epidemic spun out of control. Trevor Bedford, affiliate associate professor of epidemiology, is referenced.
June 14, 2020
The Spokesman-Review
More than 1,000 physicians, professors, public health experts and students studying medicine or public health, including some from the UW and Washington State University, signed an open letter in support of the Black Lives Matter protests nationwide. Hilary Godwin, dean of the UW School of Public Health, is quoted.
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