SPH in the News

Headlines featuring UW SPH people and research.

January 6, 2021
Fast Company
States have 15 million doses. They’ve only given out 4.5 million. This is the series of cascading failures that have taken the country to the point where vaccines may expire before we can give them out. Janet Baseman, associate dean of public health practice at the UW School of Public Health and professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 8, 2021
KIRO Radio
Dr. Helen Chu, adjunct associate professor of global health and epidemiology, has been named Washingtonian of the Year by Lieutenant Governor Cyrus Habib’s office.
January 8, 2021
KUOW
Last year, when it became clear that 2020 would be like no other, a group of University of Washington professors launched a program for freshmen called “2020: The Course.” The article links to a video featuring Hilary Godwin, dean of the UW School of Public Health.
January 11, 2021
Q13 Fox
As COVID-19 runs rampant in the Puget Sound, University of Washington scientists are tracking the virus in the one place most of us want nothing to do with — the sewer. The UW’s Sarah Philo, a doctoral student in environmental and occupational health sciences, and Scott Meschke, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, are interviewed. Angelo Ong, a research scientist in environmental and health sciences, is featured.
January 11, 2021
Popular Science
Restaurants in colder climates are serving people inside structures that mimic everything from backyard sheds to bouncy castles. When it comes to COVID-19 transmission, does eating in your own personal hamster ball, igloo or dog house count as eating outside? Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
January 11, 2021
CNN
There is no evidence the United States has a homegrown variant of coronavirus that’s fueling the recent increased spread of the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday. Trevor Bedford, affiliate associate professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 30, 2020
Seattle P-I
The University of Washington is recruiting 1,000 volunteers for a phase 3 clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine. Dr. Scott McClelland, professor of global health and of epidemiology, is quoted.
January 4, 2021
KGW
UW Medicine is looking for volunteers for phase 3 of a clinical trial of Novavax. Dr. Anna Wald, professor of epidemiology, is interviewed.
December 31, 2020
Bloomberg
Among developed nations, the U.S. stands out after a year marred by virus denial, conspiracy, mask politicization and disregard for rules even at the highest levels of government. Stocks touched record highs while millions lost jobs. Even as vaccines are rushed via trucks and planes to those most vulnerable, U.S. hospitals are growing busier by the day. Stephen Bezruchka, associate teaching professor of health services, is quoted.
December 30, 2020
KOMO News
Researchers are concerned that a new COVID-19 strain that is more easily passed from person to person could already be on U.S. soil. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is interviewed.
December 29, 2020
Q13 Fox
Maryland-based Novavax is currently conducting a phase 3 trial on its COVID-19 vaccine. Researchers at the UW are currently looking for 1,000 participants to take part in the trial. The UW’s Dr. Anna Wald, professor of medicine, of epidemiology, and of laboratory medicine and pathology, and Dr. Scott McClelland, professor of global health and of epidemiology, are quoted.
December 16, 2020
Crosscut
Seattle police rarely enforce the law that bikers must wear a helmet. When they do, it’s often against people struggling with homelessness. Dr. Fred Rivara, adjunct professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 21, 2020
Thompson Reuters
From poor families in flood-prone homes to women required to cover up in extreme heat, climate change will hit the health of vulnerable groups the hardest, warns Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and environmental and occupational health sciences.
December 18, 2020
Yahoo! News
Evidence is already emerging that online learning is leading to an education gap, one that is almost certainly growing wider by the week. Children aren’t just not learning, they are unlearning the things they had learned before the pandemic. Brandon Guthrie, assistant professor of global health and of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 20, 2020
The New York Times
Striking a compromise between two high-risk population groups, a panel advising the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voted Sunday to recommend that people age 75 and older be next in line to receive the coronavirus vaccine in the United States, along with about 30 million “front-line essential workers,” such as emergency responders, teachers and grocery store employees. Dr. Beth Bell, clinical professor of global health, is quoted.
December 22, 2020
Health Affairs
In this episode of the podcast "A Health Podyssey," Health Affairs editor-in chief Alan Weil interview Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences, on the complex relationship between climate change and human health.
December 22, 2020
KIRO Radio
Part one of an interview with James Buszkiewicz, a research scientist in the UW School of Public Health, on how and why food insecurity is on the rise during the COVID-19 pandemic.
December 21, 2020
KIRO Radio
Part two of an interview with James Buszkiewicz, a research scientist in the UW School of Public Health, on how and why food insecurity is on the rise during the COVID-19 pandemic.
December 21, 2020
KOMO Radio
A new strain of the novel coronavirus in the U.K. is raising concern, but scientists do not yet know how it will affect the pandemic. Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is interviewed.
December 22, 2020
Seattle P-I
Researchers from the University of Washington, Washington State University and Tacoma Community College are starting a second round of food security surveys to find out how the coronavirus pandemic has impacted people's access to food and other resources. Jennifer Otten, associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 17, 2020
GeekWire
Greg Akselrod is partnering with Ian Mikutel, a former Microsoft colleague, to launch a startup called VacSeen. The company produces and distributes pro-vaccine bracelets. Aaron Katz, a principal lecturer emeritus in health services, is quoted.
December 17, 2020
KUOW
Millions traveled over Thanksgiving, despite government advice to stay home. People are in a bubble with friends and family, but they’re also taking risks. So is gathering more safely possible? Alison Drake, assistant professor of global health, is interviewed.
December 17, 2020
Q13 Fox
We’ve seen a lot of loss of life in Black and Latino communities impacted by COVID-19. The data is out there to prove it, so why are people of color still so hesitant to get the vaccine? Clarence Spigner, professor of health services, is quoted.
December 14, 2020
Chicago Sun Times
Do you buy too much in the supermarket, cook more food than your family can eat, or toss out restaurant leftovers? Once you know where your weaknesses are, you can shore them up. Jennifer Otten, associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 8, 2020
The Seattle Times
"The WA Notify exposure alerts will not rid the state of coronavirus. But the system is a tool that sometimes can alert people exposed to self-quarantine and seek testing. And that could limit the contagion’s spread. The more people use it on their phones, the more effective it will be," writes The Seattle Times Editorial Board. Janet Baseman, associate dean at the UW School of Public Health and professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
December 11, 2020
KOMO News
Dr. Anna Wald, professor of epidemiology, talks about how some people who take the COVID-19 vaccine may experience side effects. As a result, UW Medicine will stagger distribution of the vaccine to frontline workers to ensure that staffing levels are stable.
December 13, 2020
CNN
Thousands of vials of the long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine are slated to arrive in all 50 states Monday, as top US health officials express hope that health care workers can begin administering the injections immediately. Dr. Beth Bell, clinical professor of global health, is quoted.
December 13, 2020
KUOW
Proper mask-wearing, hand-washing, and other precautions taken at the individual level can help reduce person-to-person transmission of the coronavirus. But another, less visible variable is also at play: Ventilation. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 11, 2020
Men's Health
As more than two people were dying in the United States every minute from COVID-19, the Food and Drug Administration’s advisory panel voted on Thursday to recommend approval of the first vaccine for emergency use in people 16 and older. While the COVID-19 vaccine process has moved at an unprecedented pace, there are three strong reasons to trust that they are safe. Dr. Sonali Kochhar, clinical assistant professor of global health, is quoted.
December 12, 2020
STAT News
There is an apparent divide in thinking on whether the COVID-19 vaccine should be given to people with a history of severe allergic reactions to other medicines, a determination that could prevent hundreds of thousands of people from receiving it. Dr. Beth Bell, clinical professor of global health, is quoted.
December 13, 2020
The Seattle Times
With the Food and Drug Administration’s first emergency approval Friday night of a coronavirus vaccine, the country faces a herculean task — vaccinating most of the United States’ 330 million residents. Andy Stergachis, professor of global health, is quoted.
December 11, 2020
The Seattle Times
The move by the Pierce County Council to take control of the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department isn’t an isolated incident amid a pandemic that’s amplified fissures between politicians, policymakers and health professionals. While such debates have been writ large on a national scale, they’re occurring more regionally as well. Betty Bekemeier, director of the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice, is quoted.
December 9, 2020
USA Today
Testing backlogs, traveler procrastination and general confusion or ignorance about testing requirements have delayed or ruined many a vacation for those traveling during the coronavirus pandemic and headed to destinations that require a negative COVID-19 test to visit or to bypass mandatory quarantines. Dr. Christopher Sanford, associate professor of global health, is quoted.
December 9, 2020
High Country News
Disaster researchers take a Prius-eye view of how COVID-19 is changing the city. Nicole Errett, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
December 9, 2020
KUOW
Just how bad is the pandemic right now? In a nutshell, bad. Today we break down the numbers and explain why this wave is worse than the previous two. Judith Malmgren, affiliate assistant professor of epidemiology, is interviewed on the "Seattle Now" podcast.
December 1, 2020
Reuters
The government network of 3,900 air-quality monitoring devices nationwide has routinely missed major toxic releases and day-to-day pollution dangers. Dr. Joel Kaufman, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and of epidemiology, is referenced.
December 1, 2020
The Seattle Times
Indoor seating at restaurants is shut down statewide until Dec. 14, while outdoor dining is still allowed, under the premise that increased airflow decreases the chance of virus transmission. But how safe is it to dine at a restaurant outside? Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, shares her take.
November 30, 2020
The Washington Post
Last Friday, while the Danish government was reeling from yet another coronavirus-related mink scandal, a troubling report was unfolding nearly 5,000 miles away in the United States: Oregon had become the fourth state to confirm a coronavirus outbreak on a domestic mink farm. The UW’s Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and director of the Center for One Health Research, is quoted.
December 1, 2020
Q13
Gov. Jay Inslee said more than 200,000 people in Washington enrolled in WA Notify, the statewide exposure notification system for smartphones. Janet Baseman, associate dean at the UW School of Public Health and professor of epidemiology, is interviewed.
November 28, 2020
The Seattle Times
As a new wave of coronavirus sweeps Washington state, positive cases are ticking up at local transit agencies, where workers have continued driving and servicing buses since the start of the pandemic. Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, is quoted.
November 27, 2020
The Hill
“The need for a cold chain has severely complicated efforts to get effective vaccines to people in both wealthy countries like the United States, but also the poorest corners of the globe. Fortunately, solutions have been developed to allow these promising vaccines to be stored and delivered at room temperature — we urgently need to prioritize these strategies to end the COVID-19 pandemic,” writes Corey Casper, clinical professor of global health and of medicine.
November 28, 2020
The Seattle Times
With novel coronavirus infections soaring to their highest levels since the pandemic started, researchers at the University of Washington are conducting the first systematic survey of mask usage in the state. Judith Wasserheit, professor and chair of global health; Brandon Guthrie, assistant professor of global health and epidemiology; Martin Cohen, teaching professor of environmental and occupational health sciences; and Marissa Baker, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences, are quoted. 
November 25, 2020
KUOW
University students and staff in the Pacific Northwest are giving a trial run to a smartphone app that tells you if you were recently near someone who just tested positive for COVID-19. State health departments are rolling out similar apps across the country to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Janet Baseman, associate dean at the UW School of Public Health and professor of epidemiolog, is interviewed.
November 27, 2020
The Seattle Times
“COVID-19 is disrupting our gatherings and replacing joyful hugs with masks and physical distance. This year, the glitter of the holidays comes from the scientific community, which is providing some of the most meaningful gifts that we can share with those we love,” writes Judith Wasserheit, professor and chair of the Department of Global Health and others.
November 18, 2020
The Seattle Times
COVID-19 patients who have high levels of coronavirus in their bodies when admitted to the hospital are four times more likely to die than those with lower amounts of virus, according to a new analysis from the University of Washington. Dr. Jennifer Ross, acting assistant professor of global health, is quoted.
November 18, 2020
The Seattle Times
COVID-19 patients who have high levels of coronavirus in their bodies when admitted to the hospital are four times more likely to die than those with lower amounts of virus, according to a new analysis from the University of Washington. Dr. Jennifer Ross, acting assistant professor of global health, is quoted.
November 17, 2020
The Seattle Times
"As Latina UW faculty researchers working with Latinx communities in Washington, we have witnessed the devastating impact the pandemic is having on our communities, from outbreaks attributed to poor and unfair work and housing conditions among agriculture and service workers to limited access to health care," write the UW's Barbara Baquero and India Ornelas, associate professors of health services, and Erica Chavez Santos, a doctoral student in health services.
November 16, 2020
The New York Times
As the coronavirus has surged again in recent weeks, much of the United States has chosen to keep restaurants open and schools closed. Much of Europe has done the opposite. The European approach seems to be working better. Janet Baseman, professor of epidemiology, is quoted. [This is part of news updates for Nov. 16.]
November 15, 2020
The Oregonian
Overwhelmed by an unprecedented increase in new coronavirus infections, Oregon’s three most populous counties are deemphasizing a time-tested infectious disease control strategy. Contact tracing efforts have been outmatched by the surge in tri-county cases, forcing health officials to pick and choose which outbreaks to focus on — leaving some cases largely ignored. Janet Baseman, professor of epidemiology, is quoted.
November 17, 2020
The Seattle Times
Due to the pandemic, Thanksgiving is going to look a lot different this year. Here’s what health officials are suggesting as we approach the holiday season, and how you can adapt your meal preparations for a smaller crowd. Alison Drake, assistant professor of global health, is quoted.
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