Student Announcements

Postings from Student Services newsletter on opportunities for students.

To sign up for the SPH Insider, contact sphsas@uw.edu.

Looking for fellowships, internships, funding, RA/TA or volunteer opportunities? Check the student opportunities listings.

The Public Health-Global Health Major advising team is excited to announce that our application for admission opened today!  It can be found here.  The application closes on Friday, October 11, 2019.

 Interested students can learn more about the major through our website, by attending an information session, or by speaking with an adviser.  Drop-in advising hours will take place in the SPH Student Center, Raitt 229 during the following times throughout AUT 2019:

  • Monday, 1:00pm-4:00pm
  • Thursday, 9:00am-12:00pm
  • Thursday, 1:00pm-4:00pm (prospective transfer students)
  • Friday, 9:00am-12:00pm (9/27, 10/4, and 10/11 only)

Seattle International Day for Just Peace

September 21, 3-5pm potluck, 5:30-8:30pm panel discussion

Madrona Grace Presbyterian Church

Join us for a community event and panel discussion featuring experts from communities directly impacted by militarization, both at home and abroad. Come take part in conversations on critical topics of war and systemic violence, from the modernization of nuclear weapons and radiation poisoning, to criminalization and policing of communities, to resistance to US military bases abroad.

 Speakers include:

  • Aaron Dixon, Seattle Black Panther Party
  • Casierra Cruz, Independent Guahan Movement
  • Donna Denina, International Women's Alliance
  • Jiji Jally, Pacific Islander Health Board of WA
  • Marie Artap, Who is Boeing Bombing campaign

 

Event Page: https://www.wanwcoalition.org/events/2019/9/21/seattle-international-peace-day

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/359597308033149/

 People's Town Hall on Nuclear Weapons

September 29, 2-4 pm

Town Hall Seattle

Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility and the Washington Against Nuclear Weapons Coalition present a People’s Town Hall on Nuclear Weapons. This conversation will inform the public and elected officials about the damage and dangers of nuclear war, examining Washington’s nuclear arsenal and the role our state has in producing nuclear weapons. Hear testimony from people whose communities have been directly impacted by the long legacy of the nuclear weapons industry in Washington State. The People's Town Hall will culminate in the development of a resolution based on the testimony given, complete with recommendations for action needed by Congress to be delivered to both of Washington's senators.

  

Event page: https://townhallseattle.org/event/peoples-town-hall-on-nuclear-weapons/

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/391472714896815/

  People’s Town Hall - Delivery Action

October 1, 11am- 1pm, Federal Building Seattle

Join the monthly anti-war protest that Seattle Anti War Coalition has organized since the start of the Iraq War. They will host Washington Against Nuclear Weapons as we expose the connection between nuclear weapons and WA State, and present the results of the People’s Town Hall to WA Senators Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray. We will present recommendations for Congressional action on nuclear weapons policy, and make clear the urgent need for nuclear justice.

 

We will rally outside the Federal Building, address the public and share our testimonies, and then deliver the People’s Town Hall testimonies and resolution to the Senators' offices.

 Event Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/2460998004224068/

Apply to be matched with a researcher in your field at any of the nine participating Institutions: UC Berkeley, UCLA, Stanford, Caltech, University of Michigan, Harvard University, University of Washington, University of Texas at Austin, and Georgia Institute of Technology Underrepresented minority Ph.D. students and postdoc fellows are encouraged to apply. For questions regarding eligibility, please reach out to the GO-MAP Graduate Success & Awards Officer (willamei@uw.edu). For more information on the program, visit: The Research Exchange grad.uw.edu/UWResearchExchange is supported by the California AGEP Model to increase the success of underrepresented minority postdoctoral fellows becoming faculty in Mathematics, Engineering and Physical and Computer Sciences (NSF award #1647273) and the participating institutions. *Ph.D. students or postdocs who are in the Mathematical, Physical and Computer Science and Engineering (MPCS&E) fields, belong to an underrepresented minority group (African American, Chicano/Latino, Native American/ Alaskan Native or Pacific Islander) and are US citizens or Permanent Residents are eligible for NSF-AGEP funded visits. Awards will be made competitively.

 

Apply to be matched with a faculty host in your field of research at: www.california-alliance.org/ research%20exchange-apply First priority consideration will be given if you apply by Sept. 1, 2019. APPLY THE PROGRAM The Research Exchange makes it easy for advanced graduate students and postdocs to undertake extended visits to research groups within the program at that critical stage when they are planning their next career move. The Research Exchange will match students and postdocs with faculty hosts in their area of research, and provide funding for them to visit a faculty host or research group of their choosing in order to share their work and ideas, learn new techniques and approaches, engage in collaborative discussions and innovation, and broaden their career opportunities. Visits are nominally expected to be of about oneweek duration, and travel and accommodation support of up to $1000 for travel within CA, $1,500 for inter-state travel will be provided.

 

ELIGIBILITY Ph.D. graduate students or postdocs from the nine participating institutions who are in the Mathematical, Physical and Computer Science and Engineering (MPCS&E) fields, belong to an underrepresented minority group (African American, Chicano/Latino, Native American/ Alaskan Native or Pacific Islander) and are US citizens or Permanent Residents are eligible for NSF-AGEP funded visits. Requests to participate from students and postdocs at one of the nine participating institutions who do not meet all the criteria for NSF-AGEP funding may be considered. Please contact your the Research Exchange contacts at your own institution for more information.

 

The Research Exchange is an unprecedented collaboration among nine of our nation’s premier research institutions—California Institute of Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Stanford University, UC Berkeley, UC Los Angeles, University of Michigan, University of Texas at Austin, and University of Washington.We are dedicated to the goal of achieving diversity at the highest levels of the scientific workforce. The scholars in this program aspire to and are being prepared for the most sought-after positions in academia and research in the Mathematical, Physical, and Computer sciences, and in Engineering (MPC&E). The California Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate is a NSF Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP-T.) Funding Sources: NSF 1647273. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. THE PROGRAM The Research Exchange makes it easy for advanced graduate students and postdocs to undertake extended visits to research groups within the program at that critical stage when they are planning their next career move. 

 

 In an effort to promote sustainable collaboration between Latino communities, both domestically and globally, and academic scholarship at the University of Washington, the Latino Center for Health offers a Student Travel Award Program. The program provides award amounts up to $1000, which covers conference registration and travel-related expenses for UW students presenting on a topic that addresses Latino health issues. Priority will be given to graduate students and primary authors, but others are encouraged to apply.

Application materials( and to reqeust material) should be emailed to latcntr@uw.edu by 5 pm PST on October 10th. .

This course examines the role of the U.S. Congress in shaping and driving U.S. foreign policy. Taught by a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives and a long-time House and Senate foreign affairs staffer, it explores both the statutory and political responsibilities through which elected representatives approach U.S. involvement abroad. Students will hone their skills in developing concise, compelling arguments on complex topics for both written and oral presentation. Course work will be largely driven by “mock Senate” floor debates, in which students will be required to confront notable foreign policy case studies from the perspective of their assigned roles as members of the U.S. Senate.

 JSIS 578 E (5cr)

Tu/Th 10:30a-12:20p

Instructors: Rep. Jim McDermott (retired) & Celes Eckerman

There are still some spaces available in JSIS 534 – Legal Foundations of World Order this autumn.

 This course examines the legal foundations of world security and stability in a time of dynamic change in international relations. Some believe that international law is a charade; governments comply with it only when convenient to do so, and disregard it whenever a contrary interest appears. But legal “norms” can still have a major impact on a wide range of economic, political and security matters. Topics will include the Just War Theory, International Humanitarian Law (the Law of Armed Conflict) and its application to modern warfare, humanitarian intervention, terrorism, nuclear weapons, suicide bombers and robotic warfare, international environmental law, climate change and the Law of the Sea.

 JSIS 534 B (5cr)

M/W 3:30-5:20p

Instructor: Rick Lorenz

CSTE is currently accepting applications for interested mentors and mentees for this program. The purpose of the program is to provide an opportunity to build relationships and foster shared learning among applied epidemiologists. The goal is to promote the exploration of career opportunities in state, local, territorial, and tribal agencies. A previous participant described their experience:

“The mentorship program was really valuable. I developed a great connection with my mentor and really felt that this was time well spent. I was able to think about my next career steps and reflect on my values and goals.”

CSTE membership is encouraged but not required to participate. The estimated time requirement for mentors and mentees is up to two hours per month.

Consider serving as a mentor: No previous mentorship experience is required, and it is an ideal opportunity for mid-level epidemiologists. Mentors are required to have at least five years of work experience. Click here to REGISTER for the Prospective Mentor Webinar on Wednesday, September 11, at 1:00 pm EDT. During this webinar, we will answer your questions and learn more about the Mentor’s role in our program.

Early career professionals can participate as mentees: Eligible mentees should be entry-level epidemiologists who have graduated within the last five years or current students.

Previous participants: Those who have previously participated in the program are eligible to apply again. If accepted, you will be matched with a new mentee or mentor; however, please note that there have been only minor changes to the program curriculum. 

Start your application today to participate in the 2019-2020 Mentorship Program. All applications are due by September 25, 2019. Please note that all applicants may not be accepted; space is limited based on the number of mentors that apply.

For specific questions about the Mentorship Program, please email Alyaa Altabbaa at aaltabbaa@cste.org.

Homelessness is a significant public health challenge in the Los Angeles region. 

To address this issue, we are asking graduate students to form teams of 2-4 people and craft their innovative policy recommendations for our Crisis Management Case Challenge. Finalists will be invited to present their solutions before a panel of subject matter experts on November 7th in Los Angeles for a chance to win $2,000!

 

This event is co-sponsored by the University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy's Global Engagement Office.

 

For more information on the Case Challenge, watch the video below and visit our website: https://www.hsacouncil.org/casechallenge

 

Key Dates

Register early to receive the case challenge five days early!

September 25: Early Registration Deadline

September 26: Early Registrants Receive Case

September 30: Registration Deadline

October 1: All Registrants Receive Case

October 13: Team Memos Due

October 16: Finalists Announced

November 7: Finalists Present Recommendations

 

Refreshments

Refreshments will be provided for registered attendees and audience members.

 

Audience Members

Would you like to attend the Case Challenge as an audience member? Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/crisis-management-case-challenge-audience-members-tickets-71685989725

 

This event is co-sponsored by the University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy's Global Engagement Office.

Course description below. Course website: https://chid.washington.edu/courses/2019/autumn/chid/496/d

 A Climate in Crisis: Staying Present and Active in the Time of Climate Change

 CHID 496D (SLN 23763):  As the climate crisis gains more and more attention from the media and the general public, feelings of eco-grief, anxiety, and helplessness abound. This focus group is formed in the hopes of inspiring and empowering its participants to take action on climate change, whether that be going to protests, calling politicians, reducing one’s personal carbon footprint, or one of the many other ways to get involved. We will brush up on the basic science of climate change and its solutions, discuss ways to control the stress associated with the crisis, and of course, the different ways individuals and communities can act to mitigate it. Several guest speakers, including climate scientists and activists, will provide facts and perspectives to improve students’ understanding. No prior knowledge of climate science or activism is required.   

 2 credit course open to all UW students.
Meets Tuesdays 1:30-3:20 pm at PDL C101.
To register for fall quarter, course SLN is 23763.

 

Contact: 

Liepa Braciulyte

liepab@uw.edu

 

Tribal community members work hard to protect and promote the health of their people. In the September session of Hot Topics in Practice, Tamara Fulwyler shares how non-tribal public health agencies can better collaborate with tribal entities to support these efforts.

This one-hour webinar will provide a brief overview of tribes in Washington, encouraging participants to understand how historical events shape the health of these communities today. It will also discuss important concepts like sovereignty and the process of consultation as important components for successful collaborations with tribal governments. The presentation will close with a review of resources for government-to-government relationship building, including NWCPHP’s new online toolkit.

Register today to better understand the benefits of effective collaborations between state, local and tribal public health agencies.

Important Notes About Hot Topics

Speaker slides are posted on our website the morning of the webinar. Each session is recorded and made available by the next day. Audio is available through computer or by phone.

Hot Topics in Practice is a monthly webinar hosted by the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Guest speakers from local, state, tribal, and national organizations present on current issues affecting public health practice.

Please contact the Center for Global Health Nursing (cghn@uw.edu)  with any questions regarding this course listing. This course will explore global health from a health provider perspective and will give an overview of global health equity. All graduate health science students are encouraged to register. Undergraduates may be considered with instructor permission.

 

If you are getting your Graduate Certificate in International Humanitarian Response, Global Health or Global Health of Women, Adolescents, & Children, this course is listed as an elective.  

 

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GH 574A/ NURS 581: Selected Topics in Global Health / Global Health Nursing

FALL 2019, TUESDAYS 1:30-3:20PM (T498)

COURSE INSTRUCTOR: SARAH GIMBEL

3 CREDITS, COURSE LISTING : 15340 / 19413

 

Global Health Nursing examines the complex local and global conditions that affect the health and illness of individuals, communities and populations.

 

  • Global health measurement frameworks and global benchmarks
  • UN Sustainable Development Goals
  • Infectious and non-communicable diseases and injury
  • Maternal, adolescent, and child health
  • Workforce and human resources for health
  • Emergency preparedness and management

 

The course will provide graduate-level students in the health sciences with a comprehensive overview of the field of global health from a health provider perspective, and allows for an understanding of the main drivers of disparities globally and locally. Health science students from all disciplines encouraged to register. Open to all graduate health sciences students. BSN , ABSN, & UG public/global health majors and global health minors considered with instructor permission (sgimbel@uw.edu)

Workgroup on Social Determinants of Health

Welcome to the 2019 – 2020 school year! We invite you to join the Workgroup on Social Determinants of Health, a faculty-supported SPH student group.

Whether your interests are in research, practice or activism, students interested in learning more about health equity and the Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) are welcome to attend. This is an opportunity to learn more about specific SDoH topics, hear from community based organizations, present work in progress, read and discuss journal articles/books and meet students from different SPH departments who share your interests. Considering the breadth of SDoH, a wide variety of topics could be discussed, including: income, education, work, housing, neighborhood deprivation, crime, social support, racism/discrimination, inequality and social and economic policies. SPH faculty will be at each meeting to guide and discuss student chosen topics.

Stay informed about upcoming meetings by signing up on our listserv here (please use your UW email address): https://mailman12.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/sph_sdoh_workgroup

Our first meeting will be on Thursday October 10, 2019 at 12.30 to 1.20 PM in room T-498 in the Health Services Building. We will provide lunch. RSVP here: https://forms.gle/vrU96XE7EtjCDKxr5. We will meet approximately monthly during the academic year.

For more information contact Anjum Hajat (anjumh@uw.edu).

 

Registration Now Open


Please join OBSSR for a virtual presentation by Felicia Hill-Briggs, Ph.D., ABPP, Professor of Medicine and Core Faculty of the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, on Tuesday, September 24, from 2:00 to 3:00 pm ET. Please feel free to share this information with your colleagues and stakeholders.

Register: https://obssr.od.nih.gov/advancing-bssr-to-address-national-priorities-for-health-care-and-population-health-improvement/

Presentation Overview
In the era of transformation to value-based care, new accountability is placed on health care delivery systems to provide high quality care that improves the health of populations, improves the patient experience of care, and concurrently reduce costs. Many priority conditions for value-based care have associated lifestyle, behavioral, and/or mental health components that contribute to disease outcomes and costs. To address these factors, there is a growing demand for BSSR interventions that are reliable, effective in achieving desired prevention and management outcomes, acceptable to patients, and flexible for integration directly into health care and population health practice. Despite the volume of effective interventions resulting from BSSR funding, adoption of these interventions into care delivery remains rare.

Facilitators of BSSR intervention integration into practice are emerging. To illustrate, diabetes is presented as a priority disease example for value-based care. Diabetes, which affects over 30 million Americans and costs $327 billion annually in direct medical costs and reduced productivity, is a disease with concomitant lifestyle, behavioral, and mental health factors. Three diabetes-related BSSR interventions are used to demonstrate pathways to BSSR integration into health care and population health practice: the Collaborative Care Model; the National Diabetes Prevention Program; and DECIDE, a diabetes self-management program. Features of pathways to integration are discussed. Implications for the design and outcomes reporting of BSSR interventions to facilitate readiness for integration into practice in the current era are identified.

Presenter Biography
Felicia Hill-Briggs, PhD, ABPP is Professor of Medicine and Core Faculty of the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is Senior Director of Population Health Research and Development for Johns Hopkins HealthCare LLC and Co-Lead of the Behavioral, Social, and Systems Science Translational Research Community for the Johns Hopkins Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (an NIH CTSA). A clinical psychologist, neuropsychologist, and behavioral scientist, Dr. Hill-Briggs conducts clinical trials of individual- and systems-level interventions for the prevention and management of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and related conditions. A particular emphasis of her research is effective intervention design and adaptation for populations of health inequity. She is developer of the DECIDE program, a problem-solving training approach to chronic disease self-management in high-risk populations, developed through NIH-funded trials. Her dissemination and implementation work extends internationally to governmental and private sector partnerships for population health management and improvement in regions with high diabetes burden, including the Caribbean and Middle East.

Dr. Hill-Briggs served as 2018 President of the American Diabetes Association, Health Care and Education. She has served on the NIH Interagency Committee on Diabetes Mellitus and several NIH Special Emphasis Panels. Dr. Hill-Briggs is the recipient of the Rachmiel Levine Medal from ADA, the Nelson Butters Award for Research Contributions to Clinical Neuropsychology from the National Academy of Neuropsychology, and the Tracey Orleans Award from the Society of Behavioral Medicine. In 2017, Dr. Hill-Briggs was elected to the National Academy of Medicine of the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM).

The recording of this webinar will be available with closed captioning on OBSSR’s website approximately one month after the event: https://obssr.od.nih.gov/advancing-bssr-to-address-national-priorities-for-health-care-and-population-health-improvement/

If you have questions about the webinar or require reasonable accommodations, please contact
Erica Moore at 301-594-4392 or erica.moore2@nih.gov, and/or the Federal Relay at 1-800-877-8339.

Register Now

 

There are still spaces available in our Russian for STEM fields class in AUT19!  If you have a student who has completed through 2nd year of Russian or is a Russian heritage speaker, please encourage them to enroll in RUSS 316.  This 5-credit class meets Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:00 – 5:50pm, and is a great way for your students to develop professional language skills in their area of study.  

 

Lani Phillips

Administrator / Graduate Program Advisor

Slavic Languages & Literatures

University of Washington

A-210C Padelford Hall, Box 354335

Seattle, WA 98195

+ 1 (206) 543-6848

There are still spaces available in our Russian for STEM fields class in AUT19!  If you have a student who has completed through 2nd year of Russian or is a Russian heritage speaker, please encourage them to enroll in RUSS 316.  This 5-credit class meets Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:00 – 5:50pm, and is a great way for your students to develop professional language skills in their area of study.  

 

Lani Phillips

Administrator / Graduate Program Advisor

Slavic Languages & Literatures

University of Washington

A-210C Padelford Hall, Box 354335

Seattle, WA 98195

+ 1 (206) 543-6848

Mind-Body Medicine Interprofessional Elective: UCONJ 531

 We are proud to have been offering this course at UW Health Sciences for almost 20 years!

 The UW course was one of the first in the United States and is based on the Mind-Body Skills groups designed by the Center for Mind-Body Medicine and found to be effective in promoting wellbeing and reducing burnout for healing professionals. 

 UCONJ 531 is a highly interactive course which uses small group discussion to debrief experiential exercises.  Participation and attendance are required at all 8 sessions.  Credit cannot be granted if a student is not consistently present for the full class time or misses a class, except in emergencies.  

 Each meeting begins with a quiet meditation, followed by check-in.  Students and faculty share their experience of the previous week, including their use of techniques they have previously learned and the benefits and challenges they have faced in practicing these techniques.  

 The majority of the class is spent on learning new mind-body techniques, including forms of self-expression.  Examples include diaphragmatic breathing, biofeedback, guided imagery, active and mindfulness meditation, exploration in writing and drawing, mindful eating.  Genograms (family trees) are constructed and shared to highlight physical, behavioral, and cultural influences from within the family

 The exact course content will vary somewhat based on the interests of the section guides and students. 

 Between sessions, students are asked to set mindfulness and self-care goals and to hold each other accountable for these goals.  A final reflection is required for credit in the course. 

 Health Science graduate students have first priority, but there are often spaces available for other graduate students and pre-health undergraduate students.  We hope you will consider joining us!

 If you would like an add code for the course, please contact Dr. Lisa Erlanger erlanger@uw.edu with your section preferences, in order. (Tuesd AM, Wed AM, Wed Eve, Thur AM).  Not all sections may be offered based on instructor and student availability.  Please also include your program of study or major, and a brief statement of the nature of your interest in the course, if you are not a health science graduate student.

 UCONJ 531 Autumn Sections:

A: Tuesday 8:30-11:20 10/1-12/3

B Wed 8:30-11:20 9/25-11/20

C Wed 6-8:50 9/25-11/20

D Thurs 8:40-11:20 9/26-11/21

Lisa Erlanger, MD, and the UCONJ531 Faculty 

 

Lisa Erlanger, MD

(she/her)

 

Clinical Professor of Family Medicine

University of Washington School of Medicine

Hall Health Primary Care Clinic

 CITIES on SCREEN: Film, Design, and the Built Environment "Black and White"

Fall 2019 College of the Built Environment

1-credit film seminar, 6 sessions, alternate Fridays 3:30-5:50 PM beginning September 27, Gould 322

BE 498 F | BE 598 F, SLN#s 10991, 10997

 

Film offers insights into how we represent, document and navigate our built environments. At the same time, the virtual space of cinema influences our thinking,

and by extension, our experience and design of both complex ideas and real places. Fall quarter we explore the theme of “Black and White,” which denotes a film process and an aesthetic, as well as connoting confident assertions of certainty and more fraught attributions of difference. “Black and White” conjures binaries and blurring, of truth and deception, documentary and drama, identity and indignity, good and evil, and conformity and resistance; and imparts meaning and metaphor in the cinematic city around issues of race, gender and the so-called Other.

 

This film seminar features discussion and full-length viewing of selected films and is open to undergraduates and graduates in all majors and departments

The application for the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) is now open, and the Graduate Fellowships Office is here to help applicants.  Please forward this message to graduate students in science, technology, engineering and math fields.

 We can help by reading statements (for organization, grammar and style—applicants should ask faculty adviser(s) to read statements for feedback on the content) and by offering application tips in individual appointments and information sessions.  All applicants should carefully read the GRFP Program Solicitation available with the application at:

 https://www.research.gov/grfp/Login.do

 The UW Graduate and Undergraduate Fellowships Offices are offering the following online sessions for applicants:

UPCOMING SESSIONS FOR CURRENT UW APPLICANTS TO NSF GRFP:

Wednesday, August 28, 1-2 PM

Thursday, Sep 12, 3:30-4:30 PM

Wednesday, Oct 2, 4:30-5:30 PM

 Access the sessions at:

https://washington.zoom.us/j/978501298

Or iPhone one-tap :

    US: +16699006833, 978501298# or +16468769923, 978501298#

Or Telephone:

            US: +1 669 900 6833  or +1 646 876 9923

    Webinar ID: 978 501 298

    International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/abmVr1uGBy

 

Quetions? Contact Robyn Davis at rldavis@uw.edu or using the phone number or scheduler below.

ROBYN DAVIS

Assistant Director, Office of Fellowships & Awards

The Graduate School, University of Washington

Communications 035A

Box 353770

Seattle, WA  98195-3770

206-685-4248

Schedule  an appointment

Dissertation Grants are available for advanced doctoral students and are intended to support the student while analyzing data and writing the doctoral dissertation. Proposals are encouraged from the full range of education research fields and other fields and disciplines engaged in education-related research, including economics, political science, psychology, sociology, demography, statistics, public policy, and psychometrics.

Applicants for this one-year, non-renewable award should be advanced doctoral students at the dissertation writing stage, usually the last year of study. Applicants may be U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents enrolled in a doctoral program. Non-U.S. citizens enrolled in a doctoral program at an U.S. institution are also eligible to apply. Underrepresented racial and ethnic minority researchers as well as women, individuals with disabilities, and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

 

http://www.aera.net/Professional-Opportunities-Funding/AERA-Funding-Opportunities/Grants-Program/Dissertation-Grants

WWAMI AHEC Scholars is an inter-professional and nationally recognized certificate program that emphasizes a team-based approach to addressing health disparities.  This two-year program can be completed at no cost, complements your existing public health graduate coursework and provides you with an agile skill set needed to lead health care transformation in rural and urban underserved environments.    

 Who We Are: 

Faculty from the UW School of Medicine teamed up with the WWAMI Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program Office to develop a program, which emphasizes interprofessional and experiential learning.  AHEC is a large federal health care training organization with specific expertise in underserved and rural health care.    

 The Program: 

In this two-year program, students can expect to participate in the following experiences: 

  1. Participate in two free Inter-professional courses (6 sessions per academic year; online modules option is also available) topics cover: 
  • Practice transformation in team-based underserved settings 
  • Behavioral health integration
  • Rural health  
  • Health Equity
  • Other emerging topics in underserved care 

 Take a field trip to an urban underserved or rural health care setting

 Take part in a networking event with potential employers

 To Join:

The WWAMI AHEC Scholars program is currently taking applications for the 2019 school year.  To learn more about WWAMI AHEC Program and to apply Visit our website at: http://depts.washington.edu/ahec/wwami-ahec-scholars-program/

 

 

There are still some spaces available in JSIS 578 – Special Topics: Congress and U.S. Foreign Policy this autumn.

 This course examines the role of the U.S. Congress in shaping and driving U.S. foreign policy. Taught by a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives and a long-time House and Senate foreign affairs staffer, it explores both the statutory and political responsibilities through which elected representatives approach U.S. involvement abroad. Students will hone their skills in developing concise, compelling arguments on complex topics for both written and oral presentation. Course work will be largely driven by “mock Senate” floor debates, in which students will be required to confront notable foreign policy case studies from the perspective of their assigned roles as members of the U.S. Senate.

 JSIS 578 E (5cr)

Tu/Th 10:30a-12:20p

Instructors: Jim McDermott & Celes Eckerman

There are still some spaces available in JSIS 534 – Legal Foundations of World Order this autumn.

 This course examines the legal foundations of world security and stability in a time of dynamic change in international relations. Some believe that international law is a charade; governments comply with it only when convenient to do so, and disregard it whenever a contrary interest appears. But legal “norms” can still have a major impact on a wide range of economic, political and security matters. Topics will include the Just War Theory, International Humanitarian Law (the Law of Armed Conflict) and its application to modern warfare, humanitarian intervention, terrorism, nuclear weapons, suicide bombers and robotic warfare, international environmental law, climate change and the Law of the Sea.

 JSIS 534 B (5cr)

M/W 3:30-5:20p

Instructor: Rick Lorenz

 Deepak Chopra is coming to town, Monday, October 7th, 2019, 7:00-8:30 pm (Meet & Greet 6:00-6:30), The Exhibition Hall at Seattle Center, 301 Mercer St., Seattle, WA 98109, $59 General Seating with new book (Meta Human: Unleashing Your Infinite Potential).  Hosted by East West Bookshop, 206-523-3726, eastwestbookshop.com.

 

Metahuman: Unleashing Your Infinite Potential

Hardcover – October 1, 2019by Chopra M.D., Deepak (Author)

Is it possible to venture beyond daily living and experience heightened states of awareness? In his latest book, Deepak Chopra says that higher consciousness is available here and now. 

Metahuman helps us harvest peak experiences so we can see our truth and mold the universe’s chaos into a form that brings light to the world.”—Dr. Mehmet Oz, Attending Physician, New York–Presbyterian, Columbia University 

New York Times bestselling author Deepak Chopra unlocks the secrets to moving beyond our present limitations to access a field of infinite possibilities. How does one do this? By becoming metahuman. 

To be metahuman, however, isn’t science fiction and is certainly not about being a superhero. To be metahuman means to move past the limitation constructed by the mind and enter a new state of awareness where we have deliberate and concrete access to peak experiences that can transform people’s lives from the inside out. 

Humans do this naturally—to a point. For centuries the great artists, scientists, writers, and many so-called ordinary people have gone beyond the everyday physical world. But if we could channel these often bewildering experiences, what would happen? Chopra argues we would wake up to experiences that would blow open your body, mind, and soul. 

Metahuman invites the reader to walk the path here and now. Waking up, we learn, isn’t just about mindfulness or meditation. Waking up, to become metahuman, is to expand our consciousness in all that we think, say, and do. 

By going beyond, we liberate ourselves from old conditioning and all the mental constructs that underlie anxiety, tension, and ego-driven demands. Waking up allows life to make sense as never before. To make this as practical as possible, Chopra ends the book with a 31-day guide to becoming metahuman. Once you wake up, he writes, life becomes transformed, because pure consciousness—which is the field of all possibilities—dawns in your life. Only then does your infinite potential become your personal reality.

Advance praise for Metahuman

“Our world is preoccupied with material progress, yet too often we overlook the miracle of our very existence. In this remarkable book, Deepak Chopra reminds us not to be distracted by the idols of our age but to marvel at the deep truths of being. Metahuman is a handbook to becoming fully alive.”—Arthur C. Brooks, PhD, Professor, Harvard Kennedy School; author of Love Your Enemies

Biography

DEEPAK CHOPRA MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing and Jiyo.com is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation. He is the author of over 86 books translated into over forty-three languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. TIME magazine has described Dr. Chopra as "one of the top 100 heroes and icons of the century." 

Dr. Chopra is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism, a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. He serves as a Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, and hosts the podcast Deepak Chopra's Infinite Potential (March 18, 2019). The World Post and The Huffington Post global internet survey ranked “Chopra #17 influential thinker in the world and #1 in Medicine.”

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Multigenerational Families, Aging and Inequalities: A Policy/service Platform (Multigen Policy)

SOC W   526A    SLN:  21289      Autumn 2019     3 credits       Fridays  11:30-2:20     Location: SWS  038

Instructor: Clara Berridge, PhD, MSW

 

Applies a multigenerational, social justice framework to analyze how historical and current policies, service structures, and regulations support or undermine families across the lifespan, with a focus on marginalized populations. Builds skills to analyze, critique, and advocate for policies and services that support growing numbers of multigenerational families.

 

The dramatic growth of the older population has resulted in a corresponding increase in the number and diversity of multigenerational (three to five generation) families. Social workers and others working with older adults often confront structural inequities and health disparities that are exacerbated across the life course for groups that have experienced historical disadvantage. Given these structural inequities and the wide range of practice and organizational settings involving diverse multigenerational families, social workers need the competencies and practice behaviors (knowledge, skills, and values) to analyze, critique, develop, and advocate for policies and programs to support them. Current social, health, and long-term care policies are typically designed as categorical, age-based approaches that may inadvertently foster competition between young and old rather than meet common needs across generations. This course is distinctive for addressing issues of older adults, aging, and service delivery within a multigenerational paradigm rather than an age-based policy context. Students will gain an understanding of the history, impact and current debates surrounding Social Security, Medicaid, Medicare, kinship care, the Older Americans Act, and the Aging Network. The course includes a workshop on digital storytelling for students to develop new skills for creative, impactful communication about policy issues they care about.

 

Interested students from other departments should request an add code through the waitlist page at:

https://socialwork.uw.edu/registration-information-graduate-students-other-departments

Slade Gorton International Policy Center Global Leaders Program:

The GLP is a nine-month leadership development program for a select cohort of students. It is geared toward students who wish to build their professional networks and receive personal career mentorship. GLP gives students the opportunity to learn firsthand from former Washington Senator Slade Gorton, a lifelong public servant; make connections with a number of high-profile guests including Governor Christine Gregoire, Attorney General Bob Ferguson, Premera CEO Jeff Roe, and Secretary of State Kim Wyman; and have access to the GLP network of young professionals. Students will learn the tenets of great leadership and how to apply those skills in public policy, law, politics, business, and similar fields. As the lessons of the GLP are applicable across many disciplines, students from any academic background are encouraged to apply.

 Classes are held once a month (the day of the week will vary) from 3:30-5:30 p.m., beginning in October 2019 and continuing through June 2020. Each class will consist of a private roundtable session to discuss a leadership or public policy issue with Senator Gorton and a guest speaker, followed by a networking reception. Certificates of completion are contingent on participation, submission of a final essay, and completion of a group public policy presentation. All program costs are covered for participating students.

   The Slade Gorton International Policy Center is a policy research center established in honor of former U.S. Senator Slade Gorton’s public service to Washington State and the nation. The Center sponsors world-class policy research and works to inspire the next generation of leaders. It is a core, permanent program of the National Bureau of Asian Research with three focus areas: policy research, fellowship and internship programs, and the Gorton History Program (archives). Learn more and application link

Please direct students to contact Meagan Araki at 206-632-7370 or maraki@nbr.org for questions.

Dear Students,

 Are you considering a public health graduate degree? The Department of Health Services trains students for influential careers in public health practice and research, health administration, health promotion, and health policy. Would you like to learn more about the types of graduate degrees we offer and what makes them unique?

 The Department of Health Services invites you to attend one of our “Which Public Health Degree is Right For Me?” sessions –

 Which Public Health Degree Is Right for Me?

Date/Time: October 10, 2019; 5:30-7:30pm

Location: UW Seattle campus, SOCC 303

Event Description: Join us for a panel led by graduate students in our COPHP, MPH, and MS programs, followed by small group break-out sessions. Pizza and beverages will be served!

RSVP link: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/hservask/375334

 Which Public Health Degree Is Right for Me?

Date/Time: November 21, 2019; 5:30-7:30pm

Location: UW Bothell campus, UW1-280

Event Description: Join us for a panel led by graduate students in our COPHP, MPH, and MS programs, followed by small group break-out sessions. Pizza and beverages will be served!

RSVP link: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/hservask/358394

Spaces available…

B H 562

Credits: 3

Title: Ethical Issues in Pediatrics

Day: TTh Time: 

8:30-9:50

Instructor: Douglas S. Diekema, MD, MPH

This course provides a survey of contemporary ethical issues that arise in the clinical and research environment when children are involved, including the role of children and adolescents in decision-making, the limits of parental decision-making authority, and issues related to genetic testing, transplantation, research, and public health. Offered jointly with PEDS 562.

Send your add code request to bhadds@uw.edu

Autumn 2019

ANTH 479 "The Patient's World"

23414 B  5       MW     600-750P   DEN  112      Messinger,Seth

This survey course focuses on 4 topics - how hospitals and researchers evaluate patient satisfaction (and how anthropologists might interpret that data or approach); how patient "experience" can be leveraged to contribute to the evidence base; the phenomenological experience of the patient in care; and design solutions to improve patient experiences. 

This course is article, and lecture / discussion, based. 

 

Contact Catherine M. Zeigler at czeigler@uw.edu  

In AUT19 we are offering a 1-credit course focusing on Russian for STEM fields.  This is a great opportunity for  students who have completed through 2nd year of Russian or are Russian heritage speakers to hone their professional language skills and learn terms specific to math and science.  

 Interested students can e-mail me at lanip@uw.edu for an add code.

Here is an opportunity to get involved with some really cool work connecting art, design and health that’s being spearheaded by folks from the College of the Built Environment.

 They’re looking to collaborate with health sciences students on a proposal for PARK(ing) Day. which takes place in the fall, which allows people to "turn parking spaces into people spaces”. Janie Bube, who is part of the Think Outside of the Park team would be thrilled to work with health sciences students on a thought-provoking and visually pleasing exhibition. No previous experience with design necessary. Applications will open in August, so initial meetings for the the concept should be happen in the next few months.

 Feel free to be in touch if you’re interested in more information or contact Janie directly at _bubej@uw.edu.

There is also a team working on a piece for the Design in Public Festival, which is about death, burial and human composting. That proposal is already submitted, but the festival takes place August 16th-25th, so go check it out this summer if you’re interested! 

 

A new section of JSIS 535: Technology, Society and the Future has recently opened up more spaces for this summer a-term course. 

 

This course explores the intersection of policy, technology and society. Technology is rapidly changing the way that humans interact with one another, markets are formed, and information is stored, shared and utilized. While technology has held and does hold great promise for being a force for both economic and social change, it also has the potential to be used in ways that threaten civil liberties, national security and data sovereignty. Private sector and civil society actors, government and military leaders, and regulators must work together to understand how new and emerging technologies will drive change across a wide range of sectors, and they must develop policies to ensure that technology is used to help improve and enrich the lives of those across the socioeconomic spectrum. 

 

Summer A-term

JSIS 535: Technology, Society and the Future (2cr)

Taught by James Bernard

SLN 14628

 

We are now accepting applications for the 2019-2020 Science Teaching for Postdocs (STEP) program. Applications are due September 6, 2019 at 5pm.

 STEP Description

Our mission is to engage a diverse pool of postdoctoral fellows at the University of Washington and affiliate institutions in a closely mentored apprenticeship to learn how to teach scientifically with inclusive, demonstrably effec tive, student-centered pedagogies.

 This apprenticeship provides teaching experiences for postdocs who have 100% research appointments. Postdocs attend short training sessions that efficiently introduce state-of-the-art teaching strategies that are effective for students and time-saving for instructors. The postdocs work in teams of three to co-design and co-teach their courses. Each team delivers a 10-week, special topics seminar course. The program directors observe class meetings and meet regularly with the postdocs to discuss the strengths of their teaching and to brainstorm on strategies to addressing areas that need improvement. Some of the seminars target biology majors, and are held at either UW Bothell or UW Seattle; other seminars are for nonmajors at UW Bothell. All of the postdocs come together at the end of the academic year to share experiences and improve their teaching philosophies and dossiers. These program features allow the postdocs to set and meet reasonable training and teaching goals without disrupting their research progress.

We are in need of a student member for the 50th Anniversary planning committee. This student will help represent student interests and generate ideas to engage students in the celebration of 50 years. If you are a student/s who are looking for a service opportunity, and who will be at the SPH for at least one more year (ideally two), please have them connect with me directly.

 They should include a short statement of interest and a resume; please send both to sphsas@uw.edu.

Thank you!

If you are attending Summer Quarter 2019, here is a great opportunity to take an eight day trip to Quebec City, Montreal and Ottawa, before Summer Quarter starts, and earn credits.  The Canada Field Studies course (L ARCH 495A or URBDP 498C/598C) is from June 16th to June 23rd, 2019.  Summer Quarter begins June 24th, 2019, but this course is considered part of Summer Quarter. Please see the attached itinerary, program description and poster.  This has been a popular course to earn I&S credits or apply towards an Urban Planning & Design Minor or an Urban Ecological Design Minor.  It can also count towards Landscape Architecture URBDP Directed Electives or any majors Thesis Electives.  It is a great course for anyone interested in understanding cities.

          If you have any questions, please contact Prof. Fritz Wagner, fwagner@uw.edu.   Please enroll soon, as plans need to be made and the month will go quickly.

We’re a couple of weeks away from the deadline to submit Spring Theses and Dissertations on the ProQuest ETD Administrator site, so I wanted to send out a reminder that we at the Libraries are here to help with students’ copyright, access, and publishing-related questions. (As always, questions about the submission process and graduation should be directed to the Graduate School.)

 We’ve been getting a lot of questions lately about formatting, so I’ve updated the ETD FAQ page with a new “Style and Formatting” section. Unfortunately, we’re not able to give students explicit guidelines on formatting choices – other than the Graduate School’s very specific requirements for the first three pages. Neither the Libraries nor the Graduate School have requirements for the rest of the document, so I usually tell students to try the following:

  • First, check with the department to see whether it has requirements. A few departments have created style guides, which are EXTREMELY helpful for students. (If you’re interested in working with us to help your department create its own style guide, we’d be delighted to do so.)
  • Second, ask the advisor if they have preferences.
  • Third, see if they can identify any disciplinary preferences by looking at previously-submitted ETDs in their field.
  • Finally, if all else fails, just pick something and be consistent. 

Again, we are here to answer students’ publishing- and access-related questions. Please don’t hesitate to contact us or forward our information! You can email me personally at ebedford@uw.edu, or our ETD team at uwlib-etd@uw.edu.

The Bioscience Careers Seminar Series Presents: 

"Unique Opportunities: My Experience at a National Laboratory."  

 

Brooke Kaiser, Ph.D.

Biomedical Scientist

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Richland, WA

 

Thursday, May 30, 2019, 5:00-6:00pm

Health Sciences Building, Room T-747

Refreshments Provided

 

Do you like having the flexibility to work on multiple projects and topics?  Do you enjoy working as a part of a multidisciplinary team?  Would you like to have some work-life balance?  Working at a National Laboratory might be right for you!  I will share my experience as both a Post-doc and Research Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, including some facts about the National Lab system, highlights of some of the research I’ve been a part of, opportunities I’ve had for professional development, and why I love my job.

 

A Washingtonian my entire life, I earned my B.S. in Microbiology from Washington State University and my Ph.D. in Microbiology from the University of Washington.  After grad school, I went on to do a post-doc at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), where I learned how to apply proteomics and other omics technologies in my research.  After my post-doc term, I was hired as a permanent employee and am currently a Biomedical Scientist in the Chemical and Biological Signatures Science group PNNL, located in Richland, Washington.  When I’m not at work, I like to spend time with my family and friends, try my hand at growing veggies in our garden, and take lots of pictures (mostly of my daughter).

 

Subscribe to our calendar!

 

Didn't make it to a previous talk? Check our website for a recap!

 

This seminar series is only possible because of generous support from the UW Departments of:

Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biomedical Informatics & Medical Education, Genome Sciences, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharmacology, Physiology and Biophysics, the Office of Research and Graduate Education, the Cell and Molecular Biology Training Grant, the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, the Graduate Program in Neurobiology & Behavior, and the Graduate School. Thank You!

 

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Bioscience Careers Seminar Series Committee Members:

Cindy Wei (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Lisa Voelker (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Erika Keim (Env. & Occupational Health), Ashley Hall (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Will Chen (Molecular Engineering), Danielle Faivre (Genome Sciences), Grace Hamilton (Biochemistry), Jacob O'Connor (Biological Physics, Structure, and Design), Amy Spens (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Taylor Wang (Molecular and Cellular Biology), Albert Yen (Bioengineering)


Administration:
Mary Downes (somevent@uw.edu)

 

Please send comments, suggestions, and listserv change requests to:
phd@u.washington.edu

 

Access our news, schedule, and past talks at:

A new section of JSIS 535: Technology, Society and the Future has recently opened up more spaces for this summer a-term course. This course explores the intersection of policy, technology and society. Technology is rapidly changing the way that humans interact with one another, markets are formed, and information is stored, shared and utilized. While technology has held and does hold great promise for being a force for both economic and social change, it also has the potential to be used in ways that threaten civil liberties, national security and data sovereignty. Private sector and civil society actors, government and military leaders, and regulators must work together to understand how new and emerging technologies will drive change across a wide range of sectors, and they must develop policies to ensure that technology is used to help improve and enrich the lives of those across the socioeconomic spectrum. 

 Summer A-term

JSIS 535: Technology, Society and the Future (2cr)

Taught by James Bernard

SLN 14628

 Volunteers Around the World (VAW) University of Washington Chapter is a chapter of a humanitarian organization that reaches out to poverty stricken communities within developing countries through medical outreach, nutritional security, clean water, and health education.  Our focus is to enhance community infrastructure both locally and internationally through improved education, access to more advanced medical treatment, and other community-based initiatives. 

 As a team member, you will have the opportunity to shadow medical professionals, work side by side with experienced doctors, perform triage, manage the pharmacy, and teach public health classes to children or teenagers. You will also have free time to travel in the host country, experience a new culture, and build amazing relationships! We are looking for committed participants who will go above and beyond to make this a memorable experience for everyone involved. 

 During Summer Break (August 27 - September 10th) we will be spending 2 weeks on a medical outreach trip to Peru!

 For more information on VAW, visit: http://www.volunteersaroundtheworld.org 

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE UW CHAPTER, VISIT: https://sites.google.com/view/vawuw/home or email vatw@uw.edu 

 

The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) in coordination with a number of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), are hosting this training institute to provide participants with a thorough grounding in conducting D&I research in health across all areas of health and health care. In 2019, the institute will utilize a combination of a 5-month online course (six modules with related assignments) between September 3, 2019 and January, 2020 culminating in a 2-day in-person training to be held January 23-24, 2020, in Bethesda, MD. Faculty and guest lecturers will consist of leading experts in theory, implementation, and evaluation approaches to D&I; creating partnerships and multilevel, transdisciplinary research teams; research design, methods, and analyses appropriate for D&I; and conducting research at different and multiple levels of intervention (e.g., clinical, community, policy).

Participants will be expected to return to their home institutions prepared to share what they have learned at the institute to help further the field of D&I research (e.g., giving talks, leading seminars, forming new collaborations, mentoring, submitting D&I grant proposals, etc.).

For a background on the training institute, please see this article published January 24, 2013: "The U.S. training institute for dissemination and implementation research in health." Implementation Science 2013 8:12.

For information on NIH funding in dissemination and implementation science, please visit the NCI Implementation Science Team Funding page.

For additional resources and information about D&I science at the NIH, please visit the Resources for Dissemination and Implementation Research page hosted by the NIH Office of Disease Prevention.

This training is designed for doctoral-level investigators at any career stage interested in conducting D&I research. We seek a balance of both junior and senior investigators, with the overall goal of bringing new people into the field of D&I research. While we anticipate most participants will be early- to mid-career individuals, we will enroll a limited number of senior researchers who are making the switch to D&I research.

In addition, to be eligible, participants must meet all of the following criteria:

  • Doctoral degree (Ph.D., Sc.D., M.D., Dr.P.H., D.O., D.V.M., D.N.Sc., etc.). Current doctoral students are not eligible to apply.
  • Demonstrated experience and expertise in health science (e.g., medicine, behavioral medicine, nursing, medical anthropology, health economics, public health, health policy).
  • NOT have matriculated through other NIH supported implementation science training programs (e.g. MT-DIRCIRITIDIRC).
  • NOT have current R18, R01, or R01-equivalent funding as a Principal Investigator for D&I research and not received such funding in the past 5 years. Note: Investigators who have received an R01 or equivalent are eligible, as long as the funding was not primarily for D&I research.
  • Feasible D&I research concept to work on throughout the course. This should be a project the applicant is seriously interested in conducting and/or submitting for funding.


Additional considerations:

Federal employees are NOT eligible to apply, with the exception of individuals whose positions allow them to receive grants and function as independent researchers (e.g., VA research investigators).

Applicants are NOT required to be citizens, permanent residents, or non-citizen nationals of the United States.

There is NO fee to apply or to attend the institute. However, all applicants are responsible for arranging and paying for their own travel expenses to attend the in-person meeting (round-trip airfare, ground transportation, hotel accommodations, and meals) TIDIRH is a significant time commitment over the entire length of the program with ongoing expectations for readings and written assignments. Attendance at the in-person training will NOT be permitted for those who have not actively participated and completed all of the required online course work. In addition, it is expected that trainees will attend the entire in-person two-day meeting.

For more information and to apply, visit the TIDIRH 2019 website

For questions about the training please contact OBSSR program staff at TIDIRH@nih.gov.

Apply to the take advantage of this fully funded conference hosted by the Elliott School of International Affairs and the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration. Be prepared for a weekend of engagement, inspiration, and networking opportunities in the heart of the nation’s capital. You will learn from and network with leading scholars and policy experts in the field of domestic and international service. You will also have the opportunity to explore Washington, DC through site visits and cultural activities.

This free, three day conference will highlight the practical skills necessary for success in a public service career at home and abroad, while also emphasizing ethical decision making.

Key Activities:

  • Hot topics in public service: Domestics and global policy, diversity and public affairs, ethical leadership
  • Explore careers in public service
  • Gain a better understanding of the graduate school application process
  • Social Events: Dinner reception and networking, social outing, and a tour of DC

When: Thursday, July 25 – Sunday, July 28, 2019

Where: Washington, DC

Who should apply?

  • Applicants must be a citizen of the United States, a legal permanent resident, or qualify for the DREAM Act.
  • Open to rising junior or senior undergraduates.
  • Traditionally underrepresented students are strongly encouraged to apply.
  • Transportation, housing, and meals will be provided.

Deadline: Thursday, June 20, 2019 at 11:59PM EST

Apply here: https://jsiawards.ppiaprogram.org/