University of Washington School of Public Health

Student Announcements

Postings from Student Services newsletter on opportunities for students.

To sign up for SPH Insider, contact sphOSA@uw.edu.
Looking for fellowships, internships, funding, ra/ta or volunteer opportunities?

Check the opportunities listings (NET ID protected)

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Space available in 2 credit, summer A-term JSIS 535: Society, Technology, and the Future, taught by James Bernard. This course explores the intersection of policy, technology and society. Technology is rapidly changing the way that humans interact with one another, markets are formed, and information is stored, shared and utilized. While technology has held and does hold great promise for being a force for both economic and social change, it also has the potential to be used in ways that threaten civil liberties, national security and data sovereignty. Private sector and civil society actors, government and military leaders, and regulators must work together to understand how new and emerging technologies will drive change across a wide range of sectors, and they must develop policies to ensure that technology is used to help improve and enrich the lives of those across the socioeconomic spectrum.

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Summer full-term, 3 credits, T/Th, 10-11:50a


Open to all students
Instructor: Peter Dunn (ptdunn@uw.edu)


This class introduces students to the concept of public space, its role in the city’s social and political relations, and the tools for intervening in public spaces. How are public spaces democratic? How do people present themselves, view others, and interact in these spaces? What are the rules of behavior, and how are they enforced? Who belongs there? Is a mall or a coffee shop a public space? Does it matter if everyone is looking down at their screens? How can physical design or programmed activities change the character of public spaces? This class will explore these issues in two ways. First, we will use foundational readings and exemplary case studies as a basis for class discussions on how public spaces have been theorized, created, and studied. Second, we will use Seattle spaces as our own case studies for students to practice looking at, inhabiting, and intervening in public space for their own creative projects.

Career WEEK Announcements

Posted: April 23, 2018

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MARK YOUR CALENDARS!!!

 Hello students!

 Are you interested in pursuing a PhD?

  • Wondering about life after graduation? Curious about the career opportunities?
  • Interested in connecting with global health organizations?
  • Thinking about joining the Peace Corps?
  • Want to learn more about adding a Global Health Minor or majoring in Public Health?
  • Want to have fun and show off your trivia knowledge?

 Then join us for these exciting events during CAREER WEEK!

 Monday, April 30

Should I Get a PhD?  

9– 10 a.m., Health Sciences HST 498

Hear from four current PhD candidates from a diverse range of fields about their experiences.

          

Interested in Minoring in Global Health?

2- 3 p.m., Raitt Hall 229

Meet the advisor and learn about our interdisciplinary minor designed to complement any major!

 Tuesday, May 1 

Global Health Trivia Night: Students vs. Faculty

5 - 6:30 p.m., Foege Genome Sciences Building, Vista Café

Get your friends, form a team and join us for a fun night of trivia, food, beverages, and prizes!

 Wednesday, May 2

Stories from the Field – with Global Health Alumni

4:30 – 5:30 p.m., Allen Library, Allen Auditorium

Get all your post-graduate questions answered from recent Global Health Alums.

 Thursday, May 3

Global Health Career and Information Fair

10 - 2 p.m., Mary Gates Hall Commons (1st Floor)

Interact with 20 local-global organizations and get exposure to your fields of interest.

 Interested in Majoring in Public Health?

3 – 4 p.m., Raitt Hall 229

Come learn about the Public Health Major from the advisors!

 Friday, May 4

Applying to the Peace Corps?

3 - 4 p.m., Harris Hydraulics, Large Conference Room 322

Work with Sara Laurino, our campus Peace Corps representative to start the application process and/or get your Peace Corps questions answered.

 Have questions or want to know more? Contact ghrc@uw.edu. See you there!

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26th Annual
Principles of STD/HIV Research Course

 

The University of Washington Department of Global Health and the Center for AIDS and STD are accepting applications for the 26th Annual Principles of STD/HIV Research Course. The course will be held July 23 - August 2, 2018, at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, USA. 

Please join us for 2 weeks of intensive cross-disciplinary training in STD and HIV research fundamentals. In this course, you will gain a practically-oriented overview of the latest in behavioral, clinical, epidemiologic, statistical, operational, and pathogenesis research in STD and HIV. This is a unique opportunity for graduate students, trainees, and early career STD/HIV researchers to learn from and network with expert faculty and colleagues from around the world through lectures, interactive learning sessions, social events, and field trips.

For detailed course information, online application, and payment information, please visit the Principles of STD/HIV Research Course website

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Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be at the front of a FOODBORNE OUTBREAK?!

  • Do you think about what you would do, who you would talk to, what the process is to identify and report an outbreak?
  • What happens at the county level?
  • How does an outbreak affect your primary care practice as you field questions from patients and their families?
  • What infection control measures do you institute at the hospital?

 

COME! BE PART OF A FOODBORNE OUTBREAK SIMULATION!

FOOD will be provided and PRIZES will be awarded as teams successfully investigate the outbreak and protect the public!

 

Sponsored by IDIG:

WHAT: Participate in a live outbreak simulation as you work in groups to identify causative agent and possible route of infection

WHEN: Thursday, April 26th, 6-7:30 pm 

WHERE: T-550

WHO WILL BE THERE?  Dr. Paul Pottinger and other infectious disease wizards along with Dr. Jeff Duchin, chief epidemiologist of King County

 

Please sign up at the Wejoinin link below:

https://www.wejoinin.com/sheets/ahbul 

If there is any interest in ZOOM for this event, please note “via Zoom” on Wejoinin or contact Maresa at maresacw@uw.edu. We have material prepared to facilitate a Zoom team if there is enough interest.

 

more info...

Global Nuclear Citizen Series: The Medical View

The Scale of Nuclear Energy and How It Affects Us: From Disaster to the Everyday

When: Tuesday, April 17th,  2018, 6pm-7:30pm

Where: Thompson Hall 101 @ Seattle UW Campus

Event Partner: Diversity in Clean Energy Student Group, Institute Nuclear Materials Management Student Group

Event Type: Panel Discussion

Target Audience: Students, Faculty, General Public

Description: Join us for a lively panel discussion and learn how nuclear energy impacts your daily life, your future, and the global community.  Light refreshments will be provided.

Guest Speakers

Scott Davis Ph.D. Epidemiologist

Scott has a long and distinguished career in the field of Epidemiology.  He has held appointments with Fred Hutch, and Chairman at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Adjunct Faculty at the Henry Jackson School of international Studies.  He has authored numerous publications that has spanned his career in research covering both ionizing and non-ionizing forms of radiation to the etiology of leukemia and lymphoma and circadian disruption.  Scott led the partnership between Japan and the University of Washington School of Public Health Epidemiology Program Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) to study the effects on A-bomb survivors. Professor Amanda Phipps Ph.D. runs the current program

Tristan Hay Ph.D. Radiation Health Physicist

Tristan has worked on PNNL projects spanning radiation physics to environmental health. He currently works for the Washington Department of Health in the Radiation Protection Group. In his job he oversees the radioactive material use in medical, labs and industrial applications across the state of Washington.

Phillip Taddei Ph.D., DABR Medical Physicist

Phil is a medical physicist at the Seattle Proton Therapy Center. He is also an assistant professor of medial physics at the University of Washington Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology. Before he came to the UW, he worked at the American University in Beirut Medical Center and at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas. His research can be found in Journals such as Physics in Medicine and Biology.  He is an advocate for children in developing countries to have access to safe, effective, proton therapy.

Moderator: Sason Hayashi B.S. CNMT

Sason is a current graduate student in the MAAIS program at the Jackson School of International Studies.

For more information contact Sason Hayashi at (globalnuclearcitizen@gmail.com).

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The Washington Patient Safety Coalition invites students and others from the medical academic community to attend our upcoming Northwest Patient Safety Conference on May 1 at the Hilton Seattle Airport, with a special discounted rate offered to students. For someone looking to build their medical career in the northwest, the conference offers the benefit of networking with the healthcare community who unites each year for this interactive one-day event, learning from industry thought leaders, and filling in common curriculum gaps in areas of patient safety. Topics covered this year include health IT, mindfulness, just culture, laughter as medicine, opioids and pain management, communication and resolution, health advocacy, care for the caregiver, burnout prevention, and more. Those in MHA and MPH programs, pre-med and medical students, and residents are encouraged to attend. Register and find more information at the event site. Students should be sure to select ‘student’ from the registration menu to receive the discounted rate of $35

Presenting this year’s theme: Propelling Patient Safety Into the Future. At a time when the healthcare landscape is rapidly changing, the value of the patient experience must not be lost. This unique event will unite medical professionals, patients, and students for a day of learning around this theme. All those concerned with embracing modern healthcare innovations while maintaining the sacredness of the patient experience are invited to join for a day of networking with a likeminded audience and engaging in sessions with industry thought leaders.

Featuring 
Morning Keynote | Michelle Mello, PhD, JD: Insights from Patients: The Future of Communication & Resolution
Afternoon Plenary | Room CircusLaughter as Medicine: The Benefit of Therapeutic Medical Clowning
Closing Session | Mindfulness NorthwestMindfulness & Patient Safety: Stress Resilience and Burnout Prevention for Healthcare Professionals
Engaging, interactive morning and afternoon sessions with industry thought leaders related to this year’s theme
Poster (and patient art!) gallery featuring patient safety efforts in local care settings and art by patients
Annual ceremony of Qualis Health Awards for Excellence in Healthcare Quality
+ Continental breakfast and plated lunch
+ Eligibility for 6 CNE/CPHQ credits
See the full agenda here

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Last chance to apply for the Design/Build  Study Abroad Programs in Sweden and Croatia! 

The Sweden program is from June 14th-August 14th, 2018 and will be in Dals Langden, where we will work with a local community, including recent Syrian refugees, to design and build a community food growing/consumption and sauna spaces. 

The project in Croatia is the Autumn Quarter, September 23rd - December 5th, 2018, and we will be designing and building a physical rehabilitation garden, in Rovijn Croatia, in a 19th century hospital on the Adriatic coast.

For info on Croatia see https://studyabroad.washington.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=11085

For info on Sweden see https://studyabroad.washington.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=11690

Contact Professor Daniel Winterbottom at nina@u.washington.edu , if you are interested to set up an application.

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Applications for the International Development and Nonprofit Management Certificate programs are due Sunday, April 15, 2018. All current UW graduate students from any campus are welcome to apply, to complete the program during the 2018-19 academic year. Please share this information with any interested students!

 

The International Development Policy and Management Certificate program (IDCP) offers students a foundation for addressing complex questions of poverty and development. The certificate requires that students complete 9 credits of core course material and two electives that cover areas or methods focused on international development. Each student creates a portfolio and short analytic paper reflecting upon the key learning experiences of the program. 

 

Contact: devcert@uw.edu

 

The Nonprofit Management Certificate program (NMCP) gives students the tools and framework needed to meet the increasing challenges facing the nonprofit sector today. The program provides students with fundamental knowledge of the nonprofit sector through one core course and four elective courses.  Each student creates a portfolio and short analytic paper reflecting upon the key learning experiences of the program. 

 

Contact: nmcp@uw.edu

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You’re Invited :: A Webinar for Military Students

12 noon PT on Tuesday, April 10

On Facebook Live: facebook.com/SCTLatUW

Learn more: facebook.com/events/931732306985355

 

Join us for a webinar about tuition benefits (Post-9/11 GI Bill) and UW resources available to military students. You'll also learn from alumni about transitioning from boots to books. Open to all; presented by the UW Supply Chain Transportation & Logistics Master’s degree program.

 

We'll hear from:

- Bill Keough (Managing Director, UW Supply Chain Transportation & Logistics Master’s degree)

- Sam Powers, PhD. (Director, UW Student Veteran Life)

- Samantha Whyte (Lead Financial Aid Counselor, UW Veterans Education Benefits Office)

- and a panel of UW alumni from the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Marine Corps

 

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Run to be the 2018-2019 GPSS Officer!

The elections that will decide the next year’s GPSS officers will happen on May 2nd (Wed), 5:30 pm in HUB 334. Please see the Elections Guide for more information. A GPSS officer position comes with the benefit equivalent to TA/RAship. If you have questions about the election procedure, please contact the Elections Committee chair, Elliott Okantey at eokantey@uw.edu. You are welcome to contact the current officers to learn more about each position.  

 

Apply to be the 2018-2019 Student Regent!     

The University of Washington Board of Regents is the University’s governing body whose broad responsibilities are to supervise, coordinate, manage and regulate the University, as provided by state statute. The Board of Regents consists of ten members, one of whom is a student who has a voice to vote on all major University decisions, such as tuition rates and approving new construction projects. The Student Regent represents the varying perspectives of students at the university – both undergraduate and graduate students, as well as students at the Bothell, Seattle, and Tacoma campuses. The Student Regent is appointed by the governor to serve for one year.

Application is due by April 16th (Mon),11:59 pm.

If you are interested in applying, please visit the application guide on the GPSS website for your information. To apply, you must submit your materials through the Google Forms. If you have any questions, please email gpsspres@uw.edu or asuwpres@uw.edu.

Career Explorations For You

Posted: April 3, 2018

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The UW Alumni Association supports your Husky experience — from day one and beyond. Get a glimpse at what life after graduation could really be like. Applications are due in April.

 

 

 

 

Huskies@Work

MONTH OF MAY Explore career options with our job shadowing program, taking place in May. Connect with an alum in person or outside the Puget Sound area through virtual meetings. Gain some real-world insight!
Apply by April 9

Go to:http://www.washington.edu/alumni/future-alumni/huskiesatwork/?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWldZNU5XVXlNalZpT1RJMCIsInQiOiJicjVBbWtUVjZVQ2dtRzhUcGE5VVFSMVwvckZcL2FxWnN6XC82elRua3U5M1JCYWg2UGFJUjEydU1YUjFQWE1UTlwvNVwveXdrYUxFd1d1SjRLb3UyeEtmb0o5NjZqQURuR1VSblVGd2FrdE9sbUJXOXdadGpiamNqeVNSeXQ3TlRcL3VhWCJ9 

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        Summer Quarter registration starts Monday, April 9th, 2018.  The first (10) students to register for URBDP 498C/URBDP 598C/L ARCH 495 Mexico Field Studies, will receive a $200 scholarship to go towards the trip.

        This Mexico Field Studies will visit Mexico City, San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato, June 12th - June 19th, 2018. Although it starts between Spring and Summer Quarter, it will be part of Summer Quarter tuition.  You can take 3-6 credits.  These credits could possibly count towards the Urban Design and Preservation Planning Certificates.  Please check with Neile Graham, at neile@uw.edu.  The Mexico Field Studies will be led by Professors Fritz Wagner and Regent Cabana.

         Please see the brochure and itinerary below.

         The Schedule Line Numbers # are:

URBDP 498C:  14154

URBDP 598C: 14162

L ARCH 495A: 11961

           If you have any questions, please contact Prof. Fritz Wagner, fwagner@uw.edu

more info...

Last chance to apply for the Design/Build  Study Abroad Programs in Sweden and Croatia! 

The Sweden program is from June 14th-August 14th, 2018 and will be in Dals Langden, where we will work with a local community, including recent Syrian refugees, to design and build a community food growing/consumption and sauna spaces. 

The project in Croatia is the Autumn Quarter, September 23rd - December 5th, 2018, and we will be designing and building a physical rehabilitation garden, in Rovijn Croatia, in a 19th century hospital on the Adriatic coast.

For info on Croatia see https://studyabroad.washington.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=11085

For info on Sweden see https://studyabroad.washington.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=11690

Contact Professor Daniel Winterbottom at nina@u.washington.edu , if you are interested to set up an application.

Student Technology Fee

Posted: March 30, 2018

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The STF has $4 million to spend for spring quarter 2018. If you have a project idea, equipment need, or technology iprovement idea, apply to the STF for funding. Contact techfee@uw.edu for assistance.

The Student Technology Fee Committee was created to ensure the best return on collected student dollars. By proposing to the committee, you agree to follow all requirements, current and future, set by the STFC. Included below are particularly relevant documents, along with brief summary and their full text.

 

Application: https://uwstf.org/create 

Compliance PolicyThe STFC retains control over items under $50,000 for 3 years, and items above for 7 years. The STFC is the owner of all purchased technology for that oversight period. The STFC may request transfer, return, or other actions for the items pruchased. The STFC may take punitive actions against non-complying organizations. All future policy changes apply retroactively to previously funded technologies.
Adobe No-Purchase DecisionThe STFC will not accept proposals for Adobe products unless a comprehensive campus agreement is crafted
Consumables PolicyConsumables, such as ink, resin, or paper may be charged for. Charges may only cover the cost of the materials. The STFC will not normally provide for consumables
Marketing PolicyFunded items, websites, created goods, and other resources are to feature the STF logo. The STF will provide stickers and vector images
Wireless Internet No-Purchase DecisionThe STFC considers wireless internet access a utility and will therefore not purchase any related infrastructure
Accessibility PolicyDepartments must keep access open to their funded resources as much as possible. All students paying the STF are expected access. Changes to resource access requires STFC approval
Supplemental PolicySometimes prices and plans change; the STFC will hear changes to previously funded proposals for one year after the original funds were allocated
Departmental Technology Obligation FindingThe STFC expects departments to provide technology that is required for their students' education. The STFC will not cover basic technological needs
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2017–18 Student Project Funding Still Available

Are you a public health graduate student in need of funding for a community project?

The Northwest Public Health Training Center at NWCPHP is still accepting graduate student applications for field placement and collaborative project opportunities in Washington, Alaska, Idaho, and Oregon. Approximately 20 proposals will be funded up to $1,500 each during the 2017–18 academic year.

Applications received during the first two weeks of the quarter will receive a priority review and notification of award decision during the third week of the quarter. After the priority period, applications are considered on a rolling basis. Act now, limited spots are available.

Visit the Northwest Public Health Training Center for more details on how to apply and to see examples of previously funded projects. Students with identified projects can request sample project plans and budgets; contact Gita Krishnaswamy with your request and a brief description of your project.

 

Go to:http://www.nwcphp.org/about/funding/phtc/student-projects 

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Your Steps to a Great Commencement Day

Husky Stadium – June 9, 2018

Visit www.graduation.uw.edu for complete ceremony information.

  1. Eligibility:

Bachelor Candidates:  Students who earned a degree in Summer 2017, Autumn 2017, or Winter 2018, or have applied to graduate with a departmental advisor for Spring 2018 or Summer 2018 are eligible. Once the application for graduation has been completed and received by the Office of Graduation and Academic Records (206-543-1803), the student will be eligible to complete the Commencement Registration/Order Form.

Master’s, Doctoral or Professional Candidates: Graduates who earned their degrees in Summer 2017, Autumn 2017, or Winter 2018 or candidates who have a reasonable expectation of graduating in Spring 2018 or Summer 2018 are eligible to participate. Graduate advisors are requested to ensure the SDB records of summer quarter graduates who have indicated they will be participating in a graduation event or ceremony are up to date in the following categories: degree title, relevant school or college, degree level, degree type and degree code.

Names Listed in Program:  The Commencement program lists the names of graduates from Summer 2017 through Spring 2018.  Note: Spring 2018 Bachelor's Degree candidates must have their Application to Graduate submitted and received by the Office of Graduation and Academic Records by the April 13th deadline in order to have their names listed. Master's and Doctoral degree candidates must have their Master’s Degree Request submitted or Doctoral Final Exam scheduled by April 13th in order to have their names listed.  Summer 2018 graduates’ names will be listed in the following year’s program.  Students who do not wish to have their names listed in the program must contact the Office of the Registrar (206-543-5378).  

Honors: If you qualify for College, Departmental, or Interdisciplinary Honors, please be sure the Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS) accurately reflects this status by April 13, 2018. If you have questions, see the Honors Program (211 Mary Gates Hall, uwhonors@uw.edu, 206-543-7444). 

  1. Come to Grad Fair

Pose for your official grad portrait (April 4th & 5th) and get your photo taken with “Dubs” (April 4th only, 12:00 – 1:00 pm).  View announcements*, diploma frames* and rings in person.  Ask the registrar about any final steps you need to complete.  Learn about the ceremony.  Win prizes. 

April 4 and April 5

10:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Mary Gates Hall Commons

*These items are available online through CB Grad Announcements, Jostens, Signature, and University Frames.  To place your order, visit www.cbgrad.com, www.jostens.com/college, www.signatureA.com, or http://uwcom.universityframes.com

  1. Signing Up and Ordering Apparel, Parking Permits, and Guest Tickets online

Register/Place your order online:  May 2 – May 20 at www.graduation.uw.edu

Husky Stadium Ceremony: Participants must register and order tickets, pre-paid parking permits, and apparel no later than May 20 via the above website.  Payment will be taken online when finalizing your order.  Visa, MasterCard, debit card, or valid checking account number will be accepted.

Apparel prices: Bachelor apparel (purchase only) - $54.00, Master’s apparel (purchase only) - $81.00, Professional apparel (rental) - $96.00, Ph.D. (rental) - $96.00. Purchase Ph.D. hood and rent the Ph.D. gown and cap - $215. Purchase professional hood and rent professional gown and cap - $175.

Parking Permits: Purchase campus parking online during registration at www.graduation.uw.edu.

  1. Individual School/College or Departmental Ceremony participants must order via the above website by May 20, 2018, if your ceremony requires apparel or parking permits.  Permits ($14) are required to park on campus for any graduation-related event, including Saturdays and Sundays.  Payment will be taken online.
  1. Pick Up Your Order: May 29 – June 2 at Husky Stadium (students will select specific dates online).
  1. Come to Husky Stadium, June 9th, at 12:30.  CONGRATULATIONS!
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Thank you for your interest in the Alene Moris National Education for Women’s Leadership Institute!

We are now accepting applications for the 2018 Alene Moris NEW Leadership Institute.  

 June 18th-23rd, 2018 UW-Seattle Campus

Application Checklist

The essay prompts in the application are also provided below. We highly recommend you write your responses to the essay questions in another document first and then copy and paste them into the online application.

1. What motivated you to apply for the NEW Leadership Institute? (900-1,000 characters)
2a. Briefly describe your involvement and/or leadership in any of the following categories: community or campus organizations, clubs, paid employment, volunteer service, internships, and/or other groups. ( max. 500 characters)
2b. Please pick one of your activities listed above and discuss how it has positively influenced or changed you. (max. 500 characters)
3. What do you see as the most crucial public policy issue affecting women today? Why is this important to you? (900-1,000 characters)
4. Please list two areas (for example, public speaking, situational confidence, etc.) in which you wish to gain personal improvement through your participation in the Institute and describe why. (max. 500 characters)

The 2018 Application is available here:

2018 NEW Leadership Application

The recommendation form is available here:

Recommendation Form

Any questions or concerns? Please contact us at newlead@uw.edu or 206-685-1090

Where is the Institute located?

On the University of Washington, Seattle campus. The Women’s Center works with participants who live outside of the Seattle area to provide housing during the Institute.

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Who is eligible?

Any undergraduate or graduate who attends a two-year college or a four-year university in Washington State (or has a permanent address here) and was enrolled for the 2017-2018 academic school year is eligible to apply.
You don’t need to be a political science major or be involved in formal political roles to be considered. In fact,  we’re looking for students with all kinds of interests and backgrounds:  we’ve had students with majors as diverse as Music, Engineering, Journalism, Neuroscience, Spanish,  Business, Anthropology, Nursing and more.

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How much does it cost?

The only cost to students who are accepted for admission is a $150.00 non-refundable registration fee.  The fee covers food, parking, and all program materials for the 6 days of the Institute.  Students are encouraged to seek funding through their school’s programs and departments. A limited number of scholarships are available for students who are unable to obtain funding from their schools.  To apply for a scholarship or housing, please submit the supplemental Scholarship and Housing Application* along with the general application. Those who are accepted to the program will be notified of their scholarship or housing award.

*Available in early spring

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Can I nominate someone to apply?

If you know a young woman who you feel would enjoy the NEW Leadership program, please complete our nomination form. We will send information to nominated candidates on how they can apply for the program.

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What can participants expect to gain?

Participating in the Alene Morris National Education for Women’s Leadership Institute is a time to:

  • Further your professional development
  • Enhance existing skills and develop new ones
  • Join a network of emergent and established leaders
  • Work and have fun with real-world women leaders and students from across Puget Sound

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What are the expectations for students who participate in the Institute?

The Alene Moris National Education for Women’s Leadership Institute participants are expected to attend all scheduled events and meals during the program. Our typical day of scheduled events begins at 8:00 am and end at 8:00 pm. Students are expected to remain on site at the UW Women’s Center for the duration of each day’s activities. Students with responsibilities for pets,  children and households are advised to arrange for assistance during the Institute so that they can devote full attention to the Institute experience. Participants are responsible for their own transportation to and from the Institute. Bus and Light Rail passes are provided.

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Application period

Applications are available now until April 8, 2018 at 11:59 pm. Click here to apply!

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2018 New Investigator Awards

The UW/Fred Hutch Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) is pleased to announce this year's New Investigator Awards (NIAs). The purpose is to encourage junior investigators to conduct independent research, publish papers, receive mentorship, and apply for grants to continue their HIV/AIDS research careers.

Applications are due Friday, May 25, 2018

For more information, download the RFA and visit our website.

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NMETH 584 Methods: Physiologic Measures
4 credits
SLN 17737
Fridays 1:30-3:50pm
Instructor: Dr. Margaret Heitkemper

This course is an exploration of the measurement of physiologic functioning in human and animal models. Examples include biochemical and biophysical measure. Students develop beginning skills with one physiologic measure. Prerequisite: physiology and chemistry and permission of instructor.

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there is a great 8-day course being offered June 12th - June 19th, 2018.  It would be part of Summer Quarter registration, which opens April 9th, 2018. The course is called URBDP 498C/URBDP 598C/L ARCH 495A Mexico Field Studies.  The students will travel to Mexico City, San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato, with Professors Fritz Wagner and Regent Cabana, who are Urban Planners. 

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING INTERESTING, FUN AND EDUCATIONAL?

How about an 7 day trip to MEXICO

                                                                        SUMMER 2018                                                     

LArc 495A and URBDP 498 C for juniors/seniors, and URBDP 598 C for grad students. Both 3-6 variable credit.  

The course is open to juniors and seniors as well as graduate students.  Professor Fritz Wagner and Dr. Regent Cabana will lead it.  We will visit three Mexican cities-Mexico City, San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato - where a number of professors, government officials and other urban experts will give lectures and tours. 

The course will examine similarities and differences between U.S. and Mexican cities.  We will look more particularly at current urban issues confronting communities in Mexico.  We will study the physical layout of cities, urban design, urban growth, problems related to the environment, governmental institutions as well as historical, social and cultural factors specific to Mexico and Mexican cities.  Students will write a paper on a topic related to an issue encountered in Mexico. 

 A FANTASTIC TRIP AND LOTS TO LEARN-YOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED

Our estimated cost of the trip (airfare, meals, ground travel, and accommodation) is $1,200, not including tuition

 Students pay own travel to and from Mexico and pay for own lodging and meals and ground transport. Suggested flight times will be offered and accommodations will be organized by instructors.

 Syllabus

 Comparative research in urban studies has been a major development in the last decade but little has been done to provide US students with a comprehensive knowledge of Mexican cities and how they compare with US cities. The aim of the course is to introduce US students to theoretical and methodological aspects of comparative urban research by providing on-site case studies of Mexican cities. 

 The course will be open to juniors and seniors as well as graduate students for three or six hours credits. The 6 credit option requires a longer paper. We will visit three Mexican cities – Mexico City, San Miguel de Allende, and Guanajuato - where a number of professors, government officials and other urban experts will give lectures and tours. The course will examine similarities and differences between U.S. and Mexican cities. We will look more particularly at current urban issues confronting communities in Mexico. We will study the physical layout of cities, urban design, urban growth, problems related to the environment, governmental institutions as well as historical, social and cultural factors specific to Mexican cities. Students will write a comparative paper on a topic related to urban issues encountered in Mexico and keep a daily journal. 

 The course introduces the logic of comparative research in the social sciences and applies its theory and methodology to the study of Mexican cities as compared to US cities. Its multidisciplinary and comparative character develops the ability to interpret and understand urban changes, changing demographics, and to analyze appropriate and sustainable strategies and policies to address urban problems in Mexico and the US. Students will gain an understanding of economic, political, social, and cultural differences between Mexico and the US. It will also help them better understand the diversity of the contemporary urban world in Mexico and the US and the importance of the social-cultural factors specific to each region and city in finding solutions to common urban problems. By the end of the course, students are expected to be conversant in cross-border urban issues in Mexico and the US. 

For further info. contact  Prof. Wagner 206-351-6749  or fwagner @uw.edu

The Public Health Radio Hour

Posted: March 21, 2018

more info...



David Roston is a Tulane MPH student who hosts "The Public Health Radio Hour" radio show on the local New Orleans station, WHIV 102.3 FM. In his weekly show, he discusses trending public health topics with leaders in the field. This Friday, he will be interviewing Dr. Pierre Buekens, Dean of Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

 


5:00 pm Central Standard Time

Friday, March 23, 2018
 

TUNE IN


Listen to past episodes on a range of health topics, and the difference our faculty and students are making across the globe. Here are just a few.

  • Zac Salinger, MPH student, discusses environmental sustainability and his practicum surrounding a vertical farming project in the Lower 9th Ward. Listen Here.
     
  • Lina Moses discussing Tulane's Lassa Fever research in West Africa. Listen Here.
     
  • Dr. Mark VanLandingham discussing his research about resilience among the Vietnamese population in New Orleans. Listen Here.


Ian Shirt, MPH
Admissions Counselor
Tulane SPHTM
ishirt@tulane.edu
(504) 988-5388

more info...

URBDP 498A / 598F ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING Spring Quarter 2018

GLD 100 Tue-Thu 10:00-11:20

 

Complexity, Resilience, and Innovation in Urban Ecosystems

Marina Alberti

malberti@u.washington.edu

(206) 616-8667

 

DESCRIPTION

This course places cities and urban regions in the context of Earth’s eco-evolutionary dynamics.

The focus is on the integration of principles of ecosystem dynamics and resilience into planning

and decision-making. The course builds on complex systems theory and explore its application

to coupled human-ecological systems through 4 modules: 1) theories of environmental planning,

2) methods of environmental assessment, 3) integrated modeling, scenarios, and strategic

foresight, and 4) collaborative adaptive management and planning. Together these modules are

used to frame and address critical transitions and resilience in urban ecosystems in the Puget

Sound region. Students learn techniques for developing scenarios, building models, assessing

resilience and devising management strategies. The course builds on a broad range of approaches

including strategic environmental assessment, place-based analysis, life-cycle techniques, risk

assessment, and adaptive collaborative planning.

 

OBJECTIVES

  • Explore theories and approaches of coupled human natural systems and resilience
  • Learn concepts and principles of complexity theory and apply them to address emerging

environmental issues

  • Understand the implications of these concepts and principles for environmental planning

and management

  • Learn how strategic foresight and scenario planning methods help to integrate irreducible

uncertainty into decision making

  • Learn how to create an adaptive management portfolio that is effective and credible in the

short and long term.

 

PRACTICUM The practicum will focus on Complexity, Resilience, and Innovation in Urban

Ecosystems. We will explore dynamics of coupled human-natural systems in urbanizing regions

and examine the drivers, mechanisms, and functions that regulate urban ecosystem dynamic and

affect human and ecological wellbeing. Building on case studies linking urban patterns to human

and ecological functions, we will develop hypotheses about what system characteristics and

qualities make cities more resilient to change and capable to innovate. This year practicum will

focus on cities and climate change. We will select case examples across US Metro areas and test

these hypotheses by exploring system resilience and innovation under alternative future

scenarios. The practicum will reflect on our findings and develop principles and strategies for

environmental design and planning.

more info...

Are you considering a public health graduate degree? The University of Washington Department of Health Services trains students for influential careers in public health practice and research, health administration, health promotion, and health policy. Would you like to learn more about the types of graduate degrees we offer and what makes them unique?

 

Please join us for one of our upcoming information sessions:

 

“Online Executive MPH Prospective Student Open House”

Friday, April 13, 2018; 1:30-5:00pm

UW Medicine South Lake Union Administration Building C

Join our Online Executive MPH students, staff, and faculty to learn how you can earn your MPH degree from a top-ranked, innovative program, while continuing to work full-time. Students will share their capstone and thesis presentations, followed by a prospective student information session, and then a networking mixer. Refreshments will be served.

Please RSVP here by Friday April 6 to reserve your spot! Facebook event page here.

 

“COPHP Prospective Student Open House”

Thursday, April 26, 2018; 6:00-8:00pm

UW Seattle campus, South Campus Center, Room 303

Join faculty, students, and staff in the Community-Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) program to learn about earning your MPH from a student-centered program dedicated to social justice and community engagement. Refreshments will be served.

Please RSVP here by Monday April 23 to reserve your spot! Facebook event page here.

 

“Which Public Health Degree is Right For Me?”

Thursday, May 3, 2018; 5:30-7:30pm  

UW Seattle campus, South Campus Center, Room 303

Join us for a panel led by graduate students in our COPHP, MPH, MS, MHA, MHIHIM, and Online Executive MPH programs, followed by small group break-out sessions. Pizza and beverages will be served.

Please RSVP here by Sunday April 29 to reserve your spot! Facebook event page here.

 

“Health Services PhD Prospective Student Reception”

Sunday, June 24, 2018; 6:00-8:00pm

Long Provincial Vietnamese Restaurant

Please join our Health Services PhD faculty, students, and alumni for a complimentary reception, and learn why our doctoral program consistently ranks among the best. Refreshments will be served (additional food and drinks are available for purchase).

Please RSVP here by Friday June 15 to reserve your spot! Facebook event page here.

more info...

Museum 588 Learning to Look: An Approach to Examining Material Culture

SLN: 17331      4 credits          WF 2:30 – 4:20             Alder 106

Instructor: Wilson O’Donnell

This course explores a methodology for identifying, describing and ascribing value to American material culture over three centuries utilizing the lens of one category of American decorative arts, furniture. American furniture is regularly an important component of collections within American art and history museums, as well as general museums, cultural centers, historic house museums and living history restorations and complexes. Participants in this course will develop a familiarity with the history, evolution, and significance of American furniture from 1620 to 1920. The methodology employed will consider the physical, historical, aesthetic and cultural importance of furniture. To a lesser degree, it will place furniture within the broader context of American decorative and folk arts, and the study of American material culture in general.

Contact Dylan High at highd@uw.edu for an add code.

more info...

There are 3 spaces available in a new spring course, Tools to End Conflict and Rebuild. This course will be taught by Mark Ward. The first half of this course will examine the current tools available to the international community to end armed conflicts – multilateral, formal, and informal. We will also seek to understand which tools work better and why. The focus will be on the ongoing conflicts in Afghanistan, Libya and Syria; conflicts in which the instructor has direct experience. The second half of the course will review the institutional tools most often used to rebuild conflict-torn countries, and to determine which are most effective and why, in both the short and long term.

JSIS 578 C, 5 credits, Mondays 2:30-5:20pm

more info...

B H548: Methods in Clinical Ethics (3 cr)             SLN#10938

Introduces the history, practice, and research methods in clinical ethics. Case-based examination of methods including principlism, casuistry, narrative methods, virtue ethics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.  

Campelia                                   M  5:00-7:20 pm                                                HSA  A204

more info...

Introduces students to research methods in bioethics, ranging from qualitative to quantitative: interviews, focus groups, surveys, and experimental and observational designs. Students write research questions, match research methods to research questions, and conclude with a proposal that uses a social sciences empirical approach to address their research question.

Bowen                                       T  11:30-2:20 pm                                                SOCC 303

Tax Classes: 3/23; 4/3, 4/5, 4/9

Posted: March 20, 2018

more info...

. Please note the time adjustment on the Thursday, April 5th Student Tax class  - it is from 12:30pm-1:30pm (I had the numbers switched earlier!) Thank you! Kyra

 Student Tax class for International Students:

Dates:

Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2pm – 3pm

Wednesday, April 4, 2018 12:30pm -1:30pm

All classes are held in Odegaard Library, room 220

  As an International student you may receive forms from the UW listing US source income that may need to be reported to the IRS (Internal Revenue Service). The information contained in these forms can be confusing. Student Fiscal Services sponsors tax classes with student tax information for UW International students who will be filing US taxes as Non-residents. The session focuses on helping students understand the 1042S forms sent out by the UW Payroll Office. This class is co-sponsored by International Student Services Office and the UW Payroll Office. The class is appropriate for undergraduate, graduate and professional International students and is offered free of charge. You do not have to register to attend.

 Student Tax class for Graduate and Professional Students:

Dates:

Friday, March 23, 2018 1:30pm -2:30pm

Thursday, April 5, 2018 12:30pm – 1:30pm

All classes are held in Odegaard Library, room 220

 Join us to learn about student taxes information on the 1098-T form. This workshop is jointly presented by the UW Law School Low Income Taxpayer Clinic and UW Student Fiscal Services. This class will go over the 1098T tax form and explain what is consider taxable scholarship income.  The class is free of charge and you do not have to register to attend.

  Student Tax class for US Citizen/Resident Students:

Dates:

Tuesday, April 3, 2018 2:30pm -3:30pm

Monday, April 9, 2018 1:30pm – 12:30pm

All classes are held in Odegaard Library, room 220

 You've received your 1098T tax form! Student Fiscal Services is presenting this workshop to help US Resident students understand the information on the 1098T tax form and how it relates to education tax credits and tax issues regarding scholarships and grants. This class is appropriate for undergraduate, graduate and professional students. The class is free of charge and you do not have to register to attend.

 

 

 

UW News writing workshops April 5-6

Posted: March 20, 2018

more info...

UW News and the Office for Faculty Advancement want to help UW faculty and researchers share their knowledge worldwide by helping them learn how to write for general audiences and how to approach nonacademic publishing venues. To that end, on April 5 and 6 we are hosting workshops on the Seattle campus for faculty, postdocs, graduate students and other UW-affiliated researchers interested in writing about their areas of expertise for mainstream audiences in the form of opinion and analysis pieces.

 

Already interested? Fill out this short form to let us know why and what you want to get out of the training.

 

The workshops will be led by an editor from The Conversation, a news analysis website that publishes articles on timely issues written by academics who draw upon their expertise and research. Assisting the editor will be our own UW News staff.

 

Last year, UW researchers across many academic disciplines published 44 analysis pieces and reached more than 1.3 million readers through The Conversation, which makes its published pieces available to other publishers for free, including The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Salon and many others. In the workshops, an editor from The Conversation will provide tips and strategies for translating academic research into articles and posts appropriate for newspapers, magazines, journals, online forums and so forth.

 

To help streamline the process of adding people to the workshops, UW News asks interested participants to fill out this short form (same link as above). Share why you're interested and what you hope to get out of the training. Note: If that link doesn’t work, copy and paste this URL into your browser to access the short form: http://bit.ly/2018workshopsUW

 

Email uwnews@uw.edu if you have any questions.

more info...
 

Only a Few Days Left to Apply to the Leadership Institute!

The application deadline for NWCPHP’s Northwest Public Health Leadership Institute is this Friday, March 23, 2018.

Leadership Institute scholars practice crucial collaborative leadership and change management skills through individual and team-based learning opportunities. Framed through a life-course lens, the program looks at health and leadership from a perspective that emphasizes equity and social justice.

The 2018 participants will:

·   Develop leadership skills and set individual leadership goals

·   Complete a leadership project, integrated with your current workplace

·   Analyze real-world public health leadership cases from a life-course perspective

·   Learn how the life-course perspective is connected to health equity and social justice

·   Connect with and learn from practice-based faculty, regional experts, public health leaders, mentors, Leadership Institute alumni, and a cohort of diverse peers

Program Dates: Late April–November 2018

Format: In-person, with Seattle onsite sessions in May, August, and November, as well as distance-based components, such as webinars, calls, and projects

Deadline: March 23, 2018

Cost: $3,000, with some partial scholarships available for professionals in maternal and child health (MCH)-related fields

Learn More >

more info...

Spring 2018: 5 credit hybrid course (meets Thurs, 8:30-10:50 AM)

Using an infant mental health framework, this course (SLN 17751) emphasizes

biological, psychological, & cultural factors that affect developmental trajectories

the role of early relationships in supporting competencies and mitigating risks

how your experience being a child impacts you as a professional and a parent

research-based principles and practices to support families, teachers, and professionals who work with young children & their families

 Instructor:

Miriam Hirschstein PhD is a psychologist and senior research scientist in Family and Child Nursing at the University of Washington. She directs an evaluation partnership with Educare, a model of center-based early childhood education implemented in Seattle and 22 other sites across the U.S.

more info...

Path 530 Spring 2018 Genomic and Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Diseases
This course presents state of the art approaches to the study of structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations, copy number changes, and genomic rearrangement in the human genome, as well as clinical reviews of associated disease phenotypes. This course includes two invited lectures each week, one weekly clinical case study and lab sessions.
SLN 18109: 4 credits, graded. SLN 18110 for 2 credit (lectures only).
Course Director Yajuan J. Liu, Ph.D. FACMG, Associate Professor, Department of Pathology, UW School of Medicine, yajuan@uw.edu Christine Disteche, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Pathology, UW School of Medicine, cdistech@uw.edu Guest Speakers Cate Paschal, Christine Disteche, Colin Pritchard, Edith Cheng, Fuki Hisama, Gala Filippova, Heather Mefford, Joe Berletch, Karen Tsuchiya, Raymond Monnat, Tina Lockwood, Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser, Xinxan Deng, Yajuan Liu, Zhijun Duan Lecture Topics

General introduction: genomic and chromosomal abnormalities

Genomic imbalance: mechanisms and impacts on disease

Genomics of neuropsychiatric disorders

Prenatal and preimplantation diagnosis

Sex chromosome: regulation, maleness, male fertility

Imprinting; Uniparental disomy

Trisomy and triploidy: mechanisms and models

Causes of chromosomal aberrations

Evolution of chromosomes: comparative cytogenetics

Chromosome breakage syndromes; fragile sites

Chromosomal aberrations detected by Next generation sequencing

Cell-free DNA diagnostics

Single-Cell Omics

3D architecture of genomes in the nucleus

Clinical cytogenetics and genomics I: autosomal and sex chromosome abnormalities

Clinical cytogenetics and genomics II: clinical applications of genomic microarray to constitutional chromosome disorders

Cancer Cytogenetics and genomics I: leukemia and lymphoma

Cancer Cytogenetics and genomics II: pediatric neoplasms

Cancer Cytogenetics and genomics III: solid tumors Class Schedule Monday: 12:00 – 1:20 PM Lecture, Health Sciences Building, Room H-562 Monday: 1:30 – 2:20 PM: Case Review, Health Sciences Building, Room H-562 Wednesday: 12:00 – 1:20 PM: Lecture, Health Sciences Building, Room H-562 Lab Schedule: The schedule of the lab sessions for students to perform chromosome preparation, chromosome identification, FISH, and array analysis will be arranged individually. Please contact Cytogenetics Supervisor Chris Donovan to schedule lab session. Email: chrisd19@uw.edu

more info...

REMINDER:
2018 EIS Poetry Contest closes March 23


The EIS Alumni Association invites all current EIS Officers and EIS Alumni to submit original poems for the 2018 EIS Poetry Contest.

For this year's contest, we offer a new opportunity for you to submit original haikus and now limericks* on topics relevant to EIS Officers and Alumni - including EIS training, work as a field officer, EPI-AIDs, influenza, epidemiology, current CDC work, other public health/preventive medicine topics, retirement, etc. The poems may be posted or read at the conference, and cash awards will be offered to the top three poems determined by popular vote.

We invite you to submit up to six original poems using the entry form (Word format or PDF format) and email to EISAAhaiku@gmail.com and eisalumni@cdcfoundation.org by midnight Friday, March 23, 2018.

Online voting (Round 1) will begin on about March 26. The top trending poems from Round 1 voting will be immortalized as fortunes in the 2018 EIS fortune cookies. The results of Round 2 voting (online and on-site voting at the EIS Conference) will then determine the final winners. First place winner will be offered a $50 award (courtesy of the Epidemiology Monitor).

Good luck and don't forget to vote in the two rounds!

*A limerick can be defined as a humorous verse of five lines, where the first, second, and fifth lines rhyme with each other, and the third and fourth lines, which are shorter, form a rhymed couplet (AABBA). Haiku is a form of poetry expressed in 3 lines with 17 total syllables (5/7/5).

more info...

Mondays, March 26th-June 4th, CMU 301

The process of transforming organizations– whether for-profit companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies– is often complex, even more so when digital information and communication technologies (ICTs) are involved. There are many reasons why organizational leaders or members initiate change, why technology adoption fails, why people resist the introduction of new tools, and why new tools often have unintended consequences and effects. Managing technology change within organizations or being a “change agent” is rewarding yet extremely challenging work. This course prepares students to take on such roles. Using a case study approach, students in this class will learn how to identify potential roadblocks to change and develop analytical lenses for assessing digitally-mediated changes in organizations. Together we will examine several aspects of such changes including innovation cycles, change leadership, technology breakdowns, resistance to ICTs and/or organizational change, and collaboration.

 

Course Prerequisites:

  • Basic word processing, Excel, and Power Point skills, and the ability to access Canvas regularly
  • Access to and understanding of how to use Canvas
  • Ability to spend an hour each week during the 10 weeks of the course at the headquarters of a Seattle-based organization that has the characteristics described above
  • A Memo of Understanding signed by the student and his/her organizational liaison is required to receive an add code for registration in the course.
more info...

COM 597 M: Digital Transformations of Organizations (Kirsten Foot)

Mondays, March 26th-June 4th, 6:00-8:50pm, CMU 302

**Please note that this class meets only 3 hours a week, but is a 5-credit course. The professor has designed the course to require weekly observation and interview sessions outside of class that are equivalent to an hour of class time each week. The course has a prerequisite: a Memo of Understanding signed by the student and his/her organizational liaison is required to receive an add code for registration in the course. Please read the full course description below for more details.

The process of transforming organizations– whether for-profit companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies– is often complex, even more so when digital information and communication technologies (ICTs) are involved. There are many reasons why organizational leaders or members initiate change, why technology adoption fails, why people resist the introduction of new tools, and why new tools often have unintended consequences and effects. Managing technology change within organizations or being a “change agent” is rewarding yet extremely challenging work. This course prepares students to take on such roles. Using a case study approach, students in this class will learn how to identify potential roadblocks to change and develop analytical lenses for assessing digitally-mediated changes in organizations. Together we will examine several aspects of such changes including innovation cycles, change leadership, technology breakdowns, resistance to ICTs and/or organizational change, and collaboration.

This course involves weekly assignments based on students’ fieldwork in a local organization, along with reading academic journal articles, organizational reports, case studies, and other types of documents, and writing weekly reports and other analyses. At the end of this course students will be able to identify key strategies for assessing and managing ICT-related organizational change, and analyze change processes in ways that support organizational development.

In order to obtain an add code to register for this course, students will first need to identify a local organization in which they can conduct fieldwork on a weekly basis during the course. The organization should be at least 5 years old, have at least 10 staff, and have undergone– or be undergoing– ICT-related change processes (tips for finding such an organization here). Each week the student will spend an hour at the organization’s headquarters, to interview a staff member and observe staff working with ICTs. The organization can be in any sector, and a UW department or office that meets the criteria above would be fine. Students should consider their schedules, organizations’ business hours, and transportation logistics when selecting an organization. Each student will print and sign this memo of understanding of the fieldwork for this course, and ask a staff member from the organization to confirm his/her consent by signing it. Heather Werckle will provide add codes upon receipt of MOUs signed by both a student and a staff member of an organization that meets the stated criteria.

Course Prerequisites:

  • Basic word processing, Excel, and Power Point skills, and the ability to access Canvas regularly
  • Access to and understanding of how to use Canvas
  • Ability to spend an hour each week during the 10 weeks of the course at the headquarters of a Seattle-based organization that has the characteristics described above
  • Memo of Understanding signed by the student and his/her organizational liaison is required to receive an add code for registration in the course.

For any questions about this course, please contact Dr. Kirsten Foot at kfoot@uw.edu.

Mesothelioma Scholarship

Posted: March 15, 2018

more info...

Danziger & De Llano, LLP. is now offering qualifying college students the chance to win a $2000 scholarship for detailing their personal experiences either living with cancer or watching a loved one battle cancer.  We hope to offer this financial assistance to help one deserving student meet his or her academic goals.

Who Should Apply?

Any student who has lived with and fought against any type of cancer, not limited to mesothelioma, is welcome to apply. We also encourage any students who have watched a family member or close friend go through the experience of fighting cancer.

We are now accepting applications for the 2018 fall semester with a deadline of August 15, 2018. We will award one scholarship in September 2018 (2017 fall semester deadline has passed).

Students applying for this scholarship must be enrolled at a two-year, four-year, community, or junior college, or in a graduate degree program on a full time basis. All college students in the United States are eligible, but must be in good academic standing at their institution with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Also qualifying are high school and gap-year students planning on attending any of the programs mentioned above.

What to Include in the Application

The main component of your application for this scholarship will be an essay, between 500 and 800 words, detailing your personal experiences with cancer. Tell us your story, how cancer has impacted your life, how you overcame adversity, how it shaped your future and goals, and how it has changed your outlook on life. Please also tell us why this scholarship is important for you.

Please include your name, email address, phone number, and university you attend or plan to attend.

Along with your thoughtful essay, we will also need:

     An official letter proving full time enrollment at an appropriate institution

     An academic transcript showing good academic standing

     Two letters of recommendation that explain why you deserve a scholarship  

     A brief summary of any honors, awards, or volunteer work

 

G   Go to: https://mesothelioma.net/scholarship/ 

Upcoming Student Tax Classes

Posted: March 15, 2018

more info...

Student Tax class for International Students:

Dates:

Friday, March 16, 2018 11:30am – 12:30pm

Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2pm – 3pm

Wednesday, April 4, 2018 12:30pm -1:30pm

All classes are held in Odegaard Library, room 220

As an International student you may receive forms from the UW listing US source income that may need to be reported to the IRS (Internal Revenue Service). The information contained in these forms can be confusing. Student Fiscal Services sponsors tax classes with student tax information for UW International students who will be filing US taxes as Non-residents. The session focuses on helping students understand the 1042S forms sent out by the UW Payroll Office. This class is co-sponsored by International Student Services Office and the UW Payroll Office. The class is appropriate for undergraduate, graduate and professional International students and is offered free of charge. You do not have to register to attend.

 Student Tax Student for Graduate and Professional Students:

Dates:

Friday, March 23, 2018 1:30pm -2:30pm

Thursday, April 5, 2018 1:30pm – 12:30pm

All classes are held in Odegaard Library, room 220

 Join us to learn about student taxes information on the 1098-T form. This workshop is jointly presented by the UW Law School Low Income Taxpayer Clinic and UW Student Fiscal Services. This class will go over the 1098T tax form and explain what is consider taxable scholarship income.  The class is free of charge and you do not have to register to attend.

  Student Tax class for US Citizen/Resident Students:

Dates:

Tuesday, April 3, 2018 2:30pm -3:30pm

Monday, April 9, 2018 1:30pm – 12:30pm

All classes are held in Odegaard Library, room 220

 You've received your 1098T tax form! Student Fiscal Services is presenting this workshop to help US Resident students understand the information on the 1098T tax form and how it relates to education tax credits and tax issues regarding scholarships and grants. This class is appropriate for undergraduate, graduate and professional students. The class is free of charge and you do not have to register to attend.

 

 

more info...

BIOST 532: Research Ethics in the Data Sciences (formerly “Ethical Issues for Biostatisticians”)

Quarter: Spring 2018

Time and Location: M 3:30-5:20pm, Health Sciences I132

Grading: 2 credits, CR/NC

Instructor: Lianne Sheppard (sheppard@uw.edu), Department of Biostatistics

SLN: 11509

 

A course for anyone interested in the responsible conduct of research (RCR), emphasizing the collection, analysis and interpretation of data in RCR.

  • Explore ethical issues encountered in the conduct of biomedical research, particularly the computation, interpretation, and communication of statistics.
  • Gain the knowledge and resources needed to formulate justified responses to ethical challenges.
  • Develop a sense of professional responsibility to take action.

 

more info...

BIOST/STAT 524: Design of Medical Studies

Quarter: Spring 2018

Time and Location: MW 8:30-9:50am, Health Sciences T473

Grading: 3 credits, graded

Instructor: Thomas Fleming (tfleming@uw.edu), Department of Biostatistics

Prerequisites: BIOST 511 or equivalent, and one of BIOST 513, BIOST 518, STAT 421, STAT 423, STAT 512, or EPI 512; or permission of instructor

SLN: 11505 (BIOST 524) or 19852 (STAT 524)

 

Design of medical studies, with emphasis on randomized controlled clinical trials. 

 

We will explore many challenging and often controversial issues:  eliminating bias, need for randomization, intention to treat principles, reducing variation, addressing missing data, phases of clinical research, role of Phase 2b screening trials, identifying and addressing safety signals, conducting confirmatory studies, when to use blinding, computing power and sample sizes, factorial designs, choosing proper endpoints, role of surrogate markers, designing non-inferiority trials, group sequential guidelines, the importance of confidentiality of interim results, role of data monitoring committees, adherence and retention requirements, interpreting confirmatory and exploratory analyses, and ethical issues in clinical research.

 

These issues will be carefully examined, with extensive reliance on examples from clinical areas such as HIV/AIDS, oncology and cardiovascular diseases.  Suitable for physicians, graduate students in biostatistics, epidemiology, medicine, and other related scientific fields.