SPH Stories

Featured stories about SPH people, research and impact.

A farmer’s market incentive program may increase access to fruits and vegetables for residents of low-income communities, suggests a study led by the University of Washington School of Public Health.

Stefan Wiktor, acting professor of global health at the University of Washington Schools of Public Health and Medicine, has received funding through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) to promote HIV prevention and treatment and to help Zimbabwe’s efforts to reach HIV epidemic control. The five-year cooperative agreement, with an annual budget of about $15 million, is administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Anirban Basu, a professor in the schools of Pharmacy and Public Health at the University of Washington, has received more than $230,000 from the National Institutes of Health to measure the current and future costs of care for people with dementia. The research is part of a sub-grant from the University of Pennsylvania.

Dementia care has substantial economic costs, with consequences for health care systems as well as for the health and well-being of families who provide care for loved ones with dementia.

More than two million people in the United States in 2016 were addicted to opioids, according to the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. Despite the existence of effective medication and services, nearly 80 percent of them did not receive treatment.

Kelsey Grinde, a doctoral student in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington School of Public Health, is a recipient of the inaugural Dorothy L. Simpson Leadership Award, presented by the Seattle Chapter of Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) Foundation. The award recognizes exceptional qualities of leadership, intellectual curiosity, generosity of community commitment and dedication to the greater good.

Samantha Dolan, a doctoral student at the University of Washington School of Public Health, was awarded a $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations Grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to improve data collection and monitoring of childhood immunizations at Kenyan health facilities by optimizing workflows.

US experts say health care systems can lead America’s efforts to prevent further danger

Genes contributing to immune and metabolic processes may be linked to chronic inflammation, suggests a new study of genomic data from more than 200,000 individuals. Findings were published online Nov. 1 in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Adolescent males who identify as gay or bisexual, or are sexually active with other males, are at high risk for HIV infection. Researchers at the University of Washington (UW) say pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) programs can significantly reduce this risk, especially in communities with high HIV burden.

Monday, November 5, 2018

Dr. Jeff Duchin, health officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County, was elected to the Board of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Duchin is also a professor of medicine at the University of Washington, adjunct professor of epidemiology at the UW School of Public Health and member of the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice.

Monday, November 5, 2018

Two students from the University of Washington School of Public Health received Exceptional Student Awards from the Washington State Public Health Association during its annual conference last month in Wenatchee.

Friday, November 2, 2018

The UW School of Public Health will celebrate its next graduating class on Sunday, June 16, 2019, at the Alaska Airlines Arena. Graduation speaker nominations are now being accepted.

"We are looking for a dynamic speaker who can engage and inspire our public health graduates, their family and other attendees," said Juanita Ricks, director of program operations for Student and Academic Services.

Speakers will be selected based on their:

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Robert Malte, former chief executive officer (CEO) for EvergreenHealth in Kirkland, Washington, joined the University of Washington School of Public Health on Oct. 1 as the Master of Health Administration (MHA) program’s practitioner-in-residence and clinical associate professor of health services.

Michael Gale Jr. (PhD, Pathobiology, '94) will receive the UW School of Public Health's 2019 Distinguished Alumni Award -- the School’s highest honor, which recognizes distinguished service and achievement in public health.

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Antiretroviral therapy has helped HIV-positive youth in sub-Saharan Africa to live longer lives and to reach ages at which they are likely to become sexually active. The other side of the coin comes with increased risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and some cancers.

In a new study, researchers at the University of Washington tested the safety and efficacy of the HPV vaccine on HIV-positive African youth and found a robust immune response to the vaccine.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

The Grayston-Day Endowed Fellowship seeks to increase the number of health professionals from diverse communities by funding the education of underrepresented students in the public health field. Meet this year's winners:

Abisayo Ariwoola

Tuesday, October 16, 2018
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Area of study: Epidemiology
Hometown: St. Louis, Missouri

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Robert Malte, former chief executive officer for EvergreenHealth, is the new practitioner-in-residence for the Master of Health Administration program at the University of Washington School of Public Health, effective Oct. 1.

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

The School’s popular public health major has evolved into the Public Health – Global Health Major to better reflect its domestic and global competencies.

“The rebrand better reflects the emphasis on global health that exists within the major, as well as the multidisciplinary, collaborative approach to population health that the program has had since its inception,” said Sara Mackenzie (MPH ‘05), director of the undergraduate program and senior lecturer in Health Services.

Tuesday, October 16, 2018
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While visiting rural villages in Pakistan in 2015, Salima Alibhai (Executive MPH ’13) was stunned to see children, sometimes as young as 5 years, with red-stained teeth.