SPH Stories

Featured stories about SPH people, research and impact.

Findings suggest COVID-19 recession might impact birth outcomes, chronic disease later in life

An international group of researchers – including faculty from the University of Washington Schools of Public Health and Medicine and the UW Medicine's Institute of Protein Design – will work together to combat emerging pandemic viruses under the auspices of a newly formed United World Antiviral Research Network (UWARN).

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health are part of two interdisciplinary teams to win Innovation Grants this year from the UW's EarthLab. Each team, which is led by and with community partners, will receive up to $75,000 to research a complex environmental issue and develop science that can be acted upon to make a positive impact on people and communities. Learn more about the two winning projects below.

Older adults with dementia are often excluded from decisions about their transitions in care as their condition worsens. And little is known about how to best incorporate their voices and their preferences in such decisions.

Anne M. Turner from the University of Washington School of Public Health and her research team hope to change this thanks to a five-year, $3.3-million grant from the National Institute on Aging. Turner is a professor in the School's Department of Health Services and associate director of the Health Promotion Research Center, which sits in the department.

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health have surveyed business leaders in Washington state, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska to identify concerns about reopening and offer solutions.

The researchers hope the survey will reveal new strategies some workplaces are using that could help others—particularly small businesses running on thinner margins. They also plan to draw on the results to develop industry-specific guidance for this and future pandemics.

A study led by researchers from the University of Washington Schools of Medicine and Public Health found that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can severely affect pregnant women who were considered overweight or obese before they became pregnant.

Public health researchers around the world have an opportunity to learn from some of the leading infectious disease modelers in the United States who are now analyzing the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), projecting the future of the pandemic and informing policy responses.

In studies of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in homeless communities in Seattle, Boston, San Francisco and Atlanta, University of Washington researchers that the prevalence of positive COVID-19 tests was higher in shelters with clusters of confirmed positive cases than in shelters with fewer previously reported cases. 

A new study led by a researcher in the University of Washington Schools of Public Health and Pharmacy concludes that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is 13 times more deadly than the seasonal flu. Findings from the study, published May 7 in the journal Health Affairs, show a fatality rate of 1.3% among symptomatic cases in the U.S. The comparable rate of death for the flu is 0.1%. 

India Ornelas from the University of Washington School of Public Health has been analyzing and studying the effect United States legal status has on the mental health of undocumented Latinx immigrants and is now looking at how COVID-19 is impacting them.

Esther Nguyen, set to be one of the first-ever graduates of the Food Systems, Nutrition and Health Major from the University of Washington School of Public Health, was selected to represent the School as its gonfaloniere during this year's UW Commencement.

Screening for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) based solely on symptoms can be unreliable in older adults, suggests the findings of a University of Washington study led by Alison Roxby, an assistant professor of global health at the UW Schools of Public Health and Medicine.

A new project led by Judd Walson, a professor of global health at the University of Washington Schools of Public Health and Medicine, has received nearly $1.4 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to monitor the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Africa and how it effects vulnerable populations. 

A new training developed by the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice at the University of Washington School of Public Health will equip an army of contact tracers with the skills they need to help slow the spread of COVID-19.

For many public health professors, online teaching alone wasn’t enough.

When the University of Washington announced classes would move online in response to the novel coronavirus, Professor Amy Hagopian knew she would have to do more than just pivot to remote teaching. She had already organized 10 spring quarter projects for her students, which were designed for a world without a pandemic or the need for social distancing.

Juan Osorio-Valencia from the Department of Global Health at the University of Washington Schools of Public Health and Medicine is one of four graduate students from the UW awarded Social Entrepreneurship Fellowships by the Population Health Initiative.

Magali Blanco and Gabino Abarca from the University of Washington School of Public Health were selected to take part in the inaugural Latino Center for Health Student Scholars Fellowship program.

The program recognizes students who have demonstrated a strong commitment to promoting the health and well-being of Latinx communities in Washington state. Blanco and Abarca, both first-generation college students, will each receive $7,500 to support their education.

Dean Hilary Godwin has been named to a panel advising Seattle Mayor Jenny A. Durkan on strategies for short and long-term community-wide infection mitigation efforts.

The experts are meeting weekly with Mayor Durkan to provide advisory support as the City of Seattle works to achieve the rapid scaling of public health infrastructure required to meet its goal of sustainably mitigating the impacts of COVID-19.

What do communities most vulnerable to COVID-19 need to know about the disease, and what are the most effective methods for reaching them? These are questions a partnership between the University of Washington School of Public Health and the Washington State Department of Health seeks to answer.

Shortages in personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care workers and recommendations made by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to wear face masks during essential outings have left many wondering what safe alternatives can protect them from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

In response to a request made by the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries (L&I), researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health tested the performance of different materials to use for possible handmade face masks.